• WHAT TO DO ON UIST

    A group of people taking a dip in the sea at a wide, flat beach on North Uist
  • WHAT TO DO ON UIST

    A group of people taking a dip in the sea at a wide, flat beach on North Uist

BEST THINGS TO DO ON UIST

THE OUTER HEBRIDES

In this guide we share the best things to do on Uist, along with extensive information on where to stay, the best places to eat and drink, how to get to the islands, and how to get around when you’re there. We also include a detailed map and practical travel tips to help your trip run smoothly.

A long string of islands, Uist lies at the centre of the group that makes up the Outer Hebrides, Scotland’s Western Isles. Linked by causeways, this island chain stretches from Eriskay in the south to Berneray in the north, via South Uist, Benbecula, Grimsay, and North Uist, with Uist serving as the collective name.

The western, Atlantic facing half of Uist is typically flat, with beautiful white sand beaches and extensive stretches of fertile machair. The eastern half is significantly hillier, with countless lochs, inlets, and skerries punctuating a jagged coastline.

With fantastic scenery, nature walks of varying lengths and difficulties, mouthwatering local food and drink, and exciting boat trips to uninhabited islands, there’s a lot to keep you busy. So whether you’re planning to visit Uist (pronounced yooist) as part of an Outer Hebrides island hopping adventure which includes Barra, Harris and Lewis, or as a trip all on its own, be sure to allow at least a few days to properly explore.

WATCH OUR UIST FILM

Watch our Instagram stories from the Outer Hebrides

Watch our Instagram stories
from the Outer Hebrides

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UIST MAP

Use the map below to help lead you to all the places mentioned in this Uist guide. You can also download an offline version to Maps.me (iOS/Android). Tap the menu button at the top left for more details, to toggle layers on and off, and switch between satellite and terrain view. See the drop down boxes below for more info on saving online and offline versions of this map.


To save this map to use online on desktop or mobile just tap the star symbol at the top. When you open Google Maps on your phone, navigate to ‘Saved’ at the bottom, then swipe along to ‘Maps’ at the top. You’ll find this map in your list of maps.

On desktop, click the three lines at the top left, select ‘Your Places’, then ‘Maps’. Click the map, then scroll down and select ‘Open in My Maps’ to access the interactive version.

Alternatively, just tap the rectangle symbol at the top right of the map in this blog post to view the My Maps version larger on desktop.

Unfortunately, it’s not possible to view this version of the map offline, but we’ve provided a download for a similar version for offline use.


To use an offline map with all the same pins and routes marked, first download Maps.Me (iOS/Android), then download our Uist Travel Guide bookmarks and select open with Maps.Me. 

You can easily navigate by tapping the bookmark for your start point and selecting ‘route from’, then tap your end point bookmark and select ‘route to’. If you want to plot a different route to the one suggested by Maps.me, just tap a third (or fourth, fifth, etc.) bookmark between the start and end points and select ‘add stop’.

You can use Maps.me offline or online, but note that the attached photos and links for each bookmark will only appear when you’re online.


BEST BEACHES ON UIST

There is no shortage of attractive beaches on Uist, but a few favourites stand out above all others. From north to south, these are our top picks for the best beaches on Uist. Note that these are all easily accessible from nearby car parks. Some other great beaches which require a bit more effort to get to are included in our Best Longer Walks section.

BERNERAY WEST BEACH // BERNERAY

BERNERAY WEST BEACH //

BERNERAY

Stretching along the entire west coast of Berneray, this beauty has been voted one of Europe’s top beaches for 2022 by Lonely Planet. With 5 km of brilliant white sand it’s ideal for a long windswept walk, or equally great for a secluded picnic in the tall, machair-covered dunes behind. There are wonderful views across to the small island of Pabbay and the hills of Harris beyond.

CLACHAN SANDS // NORTH UIST

CLACHAN SANDS //

NORTH UIST

Situated at the top of North Uist, Clachan Sands is a gorgeous white sand beach stretching 4km or so, with an informal grassy camping area dividing the beach in two. Traigh Hornais gently curves around to the southwest, with Traigh Lingeigh arcing northeast. Backed by extensive machair, it’s a spectacular setting with views across to the Udal Peninsula and small island of Boreray.

HOSTA BEACH // NORTH UIST

HOSTA BEACH //

NORTH UIST

This gem of a beach (Traigh Stir in Gaelic) is the top surf beach on Uist, but is also a beautiful spot for non-surfers too. Backed by machair-covered dunes and tucked between two small rocky headlands, Hosta feels both secluded and cosy. It also makes a great wild camp spot.

Hosta Beach, a curve of golden/white sand lying between two small rocky headlands on North Uist, popular with surfers but great too for a stroll or for camping in the grassy dunes behind the beach, making it one of the best beaches on Uist

Hosta Beach lies between two small headlands, popular with surfers but great too for a stroll or for camping in the dunes



Hosta Beach, a curve of golden/white sand lying between two small rocky headlands on North Uist, popular with surfers but great too for a stroll or for camping in the grassy dunes behind the beach, making it one of the best beaches on Uist

Hosta Beach lies between two small headlands,
popular
with surfers but great too for a quiet
stroll or for camping in the dunes



BALRANALD BEACH // NORTH UIST

BALRANALD BEACH

NORTH UIST //

The curve of white sand at Balranald is a beautiful spot for a stroll, dip, or picnic, where you can enjoy the fresh seafood delights on offer at the nearby Dunes Cabin. It’s an all-round favourite, attracting everyone from wildlife lovers (thanks to its location on an RSPB Nature Reserve) to families holidaying at the nearby campsite.

BALESHARE BEACH // NORTH UIST

BALESHARE BEACH //

NORTH UIST

Baleshare is a small island connected to North Uist by causeway, which makes for an especially scenic drive to the informal parking area on the edge of a field. The beach itself is a long stretch of flat sand sloping almost imperceptibly into the sea, and is another great spot for a dip. Rocky sections punctuate the beach, creating interesting features that change in appearance between low and high tide. Being a bit further from the road than some of the other best beaches on Uist, Baleshare is often quiet, and at nearly 6 km long it’s easy to find a private spot for yourself.

Two swimmers walk across flat sand after emerging from the shallow aqua sea in the evening at Baleshare Beach, one of the best beaches on Uist

The water at Baleshare Beach stays shallow for some distance, making it a great spot for a calm and relaxing dip



Two swimmers walk across flat sand after emerging from the shallow aqua sea in the evening at Baleshare Beach, one of the best beaches on Uist

The water at Baleshare Beach stays shallow
for some distance, making it a great spot
for a calm and relaxing dip



PRINCE’S BEACH // ERISKAY

PRINCE’S BEACH //

ERISKAY

Situated on the west coast of Eriskay, Prince’s Beach (so called after Bonnie Prince Charlie who landed here in 1745) is a picturesque stretch of white sand backed by grass and sea bindweed. It’s generally a sheltered spot and is great for swimming, although as with every beach on Uist, the water is cold! The ferry terminal for Barra is just south of the beach, making this a great spot to stop off on your way to or from the southernmost islands of the Outer Hebrides.

Prince's Beach on Eriskay and one of the best beaches on Uist, a curve of white sand in a sheltered bay with grass and sea bindweed covering the low hills behind

Prince’s Beach, close to the ferry terminal on Eriskay, is generally a sheltered spot that’s good for a swim



Prince's Beach on Eriskay and one of the best beaches on Uist, a curve of white sand in a sheltered bay with grass and sea bindweed covering the low hills behind

Prince’s Beach, close to the ferry terminal on Eriskay,
is generally a sheltered spot that’s good for a swim 



BEST SHORT WALKS ON UIST

SHORT WALKS ON UIST

Often the best way to get out and explore a place is on foot, and Uist has endless opportunities to do just that. These are a few of our favourite short walks, all 1.5 hours or less.

LOCH EYNORT ARINABAN WOODLAND // SOUTH UIST

LOCH EYNORT ARINABAN WOODLAND WALK //

SOUTH UIST

Heading east off the main road running south to north through Uist leads you through a beautiful landscape of hills and lochs. The Arinaban Woodland walk lies at the end of the North Locheynort road, a fantastic out-and-back trail along the lochside, or a loop around the hillside. The walk starts from a small parking area at the end of the road. Nearby, a hand painted map of the route shows the various trails through Croft No.8, as well as the location of numerous benches and tables (perfect for a picnic!).

Whichever trail you decide to take, the initial section follows a narrow footpath through trees. It then emerges on an open hillside with wonderful views over the sea loch. You can turn right for a side trip down to a small bay, keep straight to carry on along the lochside, or turn left to loop around the eastern slopes of Beinn Bheag Dheas. We’ve marked a possible 5 km route on our map above, and the trails are also marked on OSM mapping apps such as Maps.me or Gaia GPS. It can be a bit muddy in places, so proper footwear is recommended.

A view of Loch Eynort from the west, with the trail running along the hillside above the loch, one of the best short walks on Uist

A view of Loch Eynort from the west, with the trail running along the hillside above the loch



A view of Loch Eynort from the west, with the trail running along the hillside above the loch, one of the best short walks on Uist

A view of Loch Eynort from the west, with the
trail running along the hillside above the loch



LOCH DRUIDIBEG AND LOCH SKIPPORT // SOUTH UIST

LOCH DRUIDIBEG AND LOCH SKIPPORT WALKS //

SOUTH UIST

Another scenic side trip off the main north-south road on Uist, the road to Loch Skipport (Loch Sgioport) leads to a couple of great short walks with the opportunity to spot birds of prey and wild ponies.

LOCH DRUIDIBEG

The first recommended walk is around Loch Druidibeg, a beautiful inland loch surrounded by heather moorland and some of the highest hills on Uist. Park at the designated car park about 2 km along the road, location number 10 of the Outer Hebrides Bird of Prey Trail.

Loch Druidibeg on a sunny afternoon on South Uist, with Beinn na Laire and Hecla risng immediately behind, Beinn Choradail just visible, and Beinn Mhór on the far right

Loch Druidibeg, with Beinn na Laire and Hecla risng immediately behind, Beinn Choradail just visible, and Beinn Mhór on the far right



Loch Druidibeg on South Uist, with Beinn na Laire and Hecla the two peaks on the ridge behind

Loch Druidibeg, with Beinn na Laire and
Hecla the two peaks on the ridge behind



A series of footpaths, boardwalks, and bridges lead southwest across moorland and strips of land with the loch either side. This area is a breeding ground for short-eared owl, hen harrier, and merlin, with possible sightings of golden eagles and white-tailed eagles too.

The trail, which is part of the much longer Hebridean Way, continues for about 3 km before reaching the main road, with some boggy sections. Head out and back the same way, or if you fancy a longer walk you can carry on to the machair on the western side of the island and loop back to the car park via the road (follow the trail description and route map outlined here).

LOCH SKIPPORT

Continuing down the road and taking the right fork as you near the end will lead you to a small parking area by Loch Skipport, another good eagle-spotting location. There’s also a very high chance of bumping into some shetland ponies that roam wild around here, a 50+ strong herd belonging to the nearby crofting family at Long Island Retreats.

Carrying on down the potholed track beyond the parking area on foot, you’ll come to an old wooden jetty, with lovely views across the sea loch. The Bird of Prey Trail follows a track through the hills to the south of the parking area, up to some old shielings and along the coast for about 1 km.

A person in a long mustard coloured coat and black hat looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport on South Uist, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon

Looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon



A person in a long mustard coloured coat and black hat looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport on South Uist, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon

Looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint
above Loch Skipport, with the Isle of Skye seen
faintly on the horizon



SCOLPAIG PLUNGE POOL AND COASTLINE // NORTH UIST

SCOLPAIG PLUNGE POOL AND ROCKY COASTLINE //

NORTH UIST

On the west coast of North Uist, there is a dramatic rocky coastline to the south of Scolpaig which includes a natural plunge pool overlooking the sea. To reach it, park on the grassy verge beside the main road, just beyond a cross on the hillside to the left (if approaching from the south) and before the track on the left leading to a large house with sculpted edges (see our map for the exact location).

A natural plunge pool (bottom left third in picture) formed in the rocky coastline near Scolpaig on North Uist

The plunge pool (bottom left third in picture) and the rocky coastline near Scolpaig



A natural plunge pool (bottom left third in picture) formed in the rocky coastline near Scolpaig on North Uist

The plunge pool on the coast near Scolpaig,
accessed
from above via the rocky chute



Go through the gate, then head west across the open hillside. When you reach the coast, turn left and head south just a little, looking out for a rocky chute with the plunge pool at the bottom. You can climb down the rocks to get close to the pool, although swimming in it isn’t always possible due to the buildup of algae. The location is spectacular, well worth the 10 minute walk from the road!

BEST LONGER WALKS ON UIST

LONGER WALKS ON UIST

There are plenty of beautiful beaches and interesting sights on Uist which require a longer journey on foot to best explore. These are a few of our recommended longer walks, between about 1.5 and 3 hours in length.

VALLAY TIDAL ISLAND // NORTH UIST

VALLAY TIDAL ISLAND //

NORTH UIST

The uninhabited tidal island of Vallay (Bhalaigh) is home to the enigmatic ruins of an enormous house built by Erskine Beveridge, a wealthy linen industrialist from Fife, and has a number of beautiful beaches on its northern shores. It takes about 30 minutes to reach the island, walking across an open expanse of sand and mud flats exposed at low tide.

A person walks across an open expanse of wet sand at low tide to reach the formerly inhabited Vallay Island on Uist

It takes about 30 minutes to walk across an open expanse of sand at low tide to reach Vallay Island



A person walks across an open expanse of wet sand at low tide to reach the formerly inhabited Vallay Island on Uist

It takes about 30 minutes to walk across an open
expanse of sand at low tide to reach Vallay Island



Approaching the island, the big house looms on the left, with the ruins of smaller farmhouse buildings on the right. The house is unlike any other on Uist, a baronial style mansion with dozens of rooms spread over two floors. The prominent crow-stepped gables are perhaps a nod to Beveridge’s Fife roots, where this style of architecture is common in historic buildings. Built around 1902, the house has been uninhabited since 1944 when Erskine’s son, George, drowned while crossing between North Uist and Vallay by boat. The harsh Atlantic weather has since taken its toll, and with the roof and much of the interior having collapsed, only the shell remains.

The ruined shell of a two storey mansion, once belonging to Erskine Beveridge, on the tidal island of Vallay which is reachable on foot from North Uist at low tide

Only the shell remains of Erskine Beveridge’s grand house



The ruined shell of a two storey mansion, once belonging to Erskine Beveridge, on the tidal island of Vallay which is reachable on foot from North Uist at low tide

Only the shell remains of Beveridge’s grand house



Passing by the house and continuing to the northern side of the island will lead you to some beautiful beaches. Curves of white sand framed by dark coloured rocks spread out to the west and east, peaceful spots although with some very vocal oystercatchers. The hills of Harris rise to the northeast and the vast expanse of the Atlantic stretches off to the west.

Unless you plan on camping overnight, be sure to head back before the tide starts coming in, which can happen quite fast. It’s best to allow around 2 – 2.5 hours for the return trip, aiming to cross about two hours before low tide. There is space for a few cars to park at the start of the walk, in the small township of Cladach Vallay (see our map for the exact location and walking route).

Beautiful and quiet white sand beaches curving round the northern side of Vallay, a tidal island adjacent to North Uist

Beautiful and quiet beaches on the northern side of Vallay



Beautiful and quiet white sand beaches curving round the northern side of Vallay, a tidal island adjacent to North Uist

Beautiful beaches on the northern side of Vallay



UDAL PENINSULA // NORTH UIST

UDAL PENINSULA //

NORTH UIST

A loop around the Udal Peninsula takes in gorgeous beaches as well as archaeological sites dating back to Neolithic times. There is a fantastic audio walking tour you can follow which tells you all about the history and wildlife of the peninsula, narrated by members of the local community. The tour is available on the izi.travel app (iOS/Android). Download the app and search for North Uist to find it.

Park at the end of the road at Grenitote, where a track leads along the wide sandy bay of Traigh Ear towards the headland. Here you’ll find the 18th century cemetery of the MacLeans of Boreray, with the island itself lying just across the water. Crossing to the western side of the peninsula you’ll find Traigh Udal, a scenic curve of white sand beach. Heading south you’ll reach the impressive remains of a 1500 – 2000 year old roundhouse, excavated in the late 20th century. Beyond here lies the beautiful expanse of Traigh Iar, sweeping southwest towards Vallay. Take a walk along the beach, before looping back to the start.

Allow around 3 hours for the walk, which is 10 km or so. You can view and download the route on our map, and read about and/or listen to the history and significance of the peninsula on the izi website.

BALRANALD NATURE RESERVE // NORTH UIST

BALRANALD RESERVE //

NORTH UIST

Balranald, as mentioned in our best beaches on Uist section, is an RSPB Nature Reserve. For those with an interest in birds and wildlife it’s well worth exploring beyond the beach itself. There is a waymarked trail leading around the rocky headland south of the beach, a 6 km loop starting from the parking area by the visitor centre.

The curving white sand beach at Balranald on North Uist, behind which lie grassy dunes and the RSPB Nature Trail

The trail at the Balranald RSPB Nature Reserve leads around the southern end of the beach to a rocky headland



The curving white sand beach at Balranald on North Uist, behind which lie grassy dunes and the RSPB Nature Trail

The Balranald RSPB Nature Reserve trail
leads around the southern end of the beach
to a rocky headland



Balranald is a haven for wildlife, including birds of prey, otters, and the rare corncrake. The walk, which takes around 1.5 hours, takes in a variety of landscapes and terrain, including fertile machair, sand dunes, rocky coastline, marshes, lochs, and ocean habitats. The highlights change throughout the seasons, and before setting off it’s well worth popping into the visitor centre, housed in a small whitewashed cottage. Here you’ll find a wealth of information as well as a list of recent wildlife sightings.

There is a map of the route inside the visitor centre, and you can view and download it on our map above too. Public toilets are also available at the visitor centre.

HILLWALKING ON UIST

While the hills on the eastern half of Uist may not be overly high in comparison to those on mainland Scotland, they are an impressive sight looming over this otherwise low-lying landscape. If you’re looking for a somewhat challenging day hike on pathless terrain, tackling one of the island’s tallest peaks could be for you.

Eaval (Eabhal) is the highest in North Uist at 347 m, its prominent peak visible from all over the island. Count on the 11 km return hike taking about 5.5 hours. Note that the stepping stones over the outflow of water from Loch Obasaraigh (less than 1 km from the start of the walk) can be covered at high tide, so it’s best to plan your walk accordingly. You can read a full trail description on WalkHighlands.

Eaval (Eabhal), the highest peak on North Uist, rising above the surrounding low-lying landscape dotted with a few white houses

Eaval (Eabhal), the highest peak on North Uist, rising above the surrounding low-lying landscape to a height of 347 m



Eaval (Eabhal), the highest peak on North Uist, rising above the surrounding low-lying landscape dotted with a few white houses

Eaval, the highest peak on North Uist,
rising above the surrounding low-lying
landscape to a height of 347 m



Beinn Mhór is South Uist’s highest peak at 620 m, offering fantastic views over the islands from the summit (weather permitting of course!). You can start the hike from Loch Eynort (the same spot as the Arinaban Woodland walk), approaching from the south, however approaching from the north is considered easier. This is the route outlined on WalkHighlands, and the one we would suggest following. Allow around 7 hours for the 12.5 km return hike, and longer if you plan to take in Hecla too, as per the WH route description.

SEE MORE FROM SCOTLAND

A person walks across golden glowing sand towards the water's edge at Luskentyre Beach (Traigh Rosamol) on Harris, with the shadows long as sunset approaches
A person in a long mustard coloured coat and black hat looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport on South Uist, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon
A yacht in the bay at Vatersay with pastel sunset skies and the silhouette of the Isle of Rum in the background
One of the two famous stacks of St Kilda, Stac Lee rises from the sea as birds swarm around and the tourist boat MV Cuma offloads kayakers below
A walker on the old military road among the dramatic mountain scenery of the Lairigmor, a real highlight of the West Highland Way
A view of Buachaille Etive Mor on the West Highland Way
A tent set up with expansive views of the surrounding hills near Ba Bridge on Rannoch Moor, this hiker found the perfect spot while camping the West Highland Way
A person stands on the wide expanse of Tresness Beach on Sanday
An impressive view of the Old Man of Hoy from the south, showing the towering stack detatched from the rugged red cliffs of the island's west coast
Standing stones set in a large circle, known as the Ring of Brodgar, one of Orkney's most iconic sites and Scotland's largest stone circle
A person walks along the unspoiled beach of the Tresness Peninsula on Sanday
Two surfers walk across the sand in the afternoon sun at Ceannabeinne Beach, not far from Durness on the North Coast 500 route.
An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.
Peanmeanach Bothy on the Ardnish Peninsula in February
Culross: Scotland's Best Preserved 17th century town
A person walks across golden glowing sand towards the water's edge at Luskentyre Beach (Traigh Rosamol) on Harris, with the shadows long as sunset approaches
A person in a long mustard coloured coat and black hat looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport on South Uist, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon
A yacht in the bay at Vatersay with pastel sunset skies and the silhouette of the Isle of Rum in the background
One of the two famous stacks of St Kilda, Stac Lee rises from the sea as birds swarm around and the tourist boat MV Cuma offloads kayakers below
A walker on the old military road among the dramatic mountain scenery of the Lairigmor, a real highlight of the West Highland Way
A view of Buachaille Etive Mor on the West Highland Way
A tent set up with expansive views of the surrounding hills near Ba Bridge on Rannoch Moor, this hiker found the perfect spot while camping the West Highland Way
A person stands on the wide expanse of Tresness Beach on Sanday
An impressive view of the Old Man of Hoy from the south, showing the towering stack detatched from the rugged red cliffs of the island's west coast
Standing stones set in a large circle, known as the Ring of Brodgar, one of Orkney's most iconic sites and Scotland's largest stone circle
A person walks along the unspoiled beach of the Tresness Peninsula on Sanday
Two surfers walk across the sand in the afternoon sun at Ceannabeinne Beach, not far from Durness on the North Coast 500 route.
An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.
Peanmeanach Bothy on the Ardnish Peninsula in February
Culross: Scotland's Best Preserved 17th century town

UIST CULTURE AND CRAFTS

For an insight into Uist culture and the chance to pick up some quality local craftware and products, don’t miss the following interesting spots and experiences.

NORTH UIST DISTILLERY // NUNTON STEADINGS, BENBECULA

NORTH UIST DISTILLERY //

NUNTON STEADINGS, BENBECULA

North Uist Distillery is one of the most exciting startups on Uist, the island’s first (legal) distillery currently producing excellent craft gin, with whisky coming in the future. Operating out of the 18th century Nunton Steadings, the chance to see inside this historic building is reason enough to pop by, but of course we’d highly recommend a gin tasting too.

The 18th century Nunton Steadings, long and low whitewashed buildings with traditional slate roofs, home to North Uist Distillery

The 18th century Nunton Steadings, home to North Uist Distillery



The 18th century Nunton Steadings, long and low whitewashed buildings with traditional slate roofs, home to North Uist Distillery

The 18th century Nunton Steadings,
home to North Uist Distillery



Having grown up on North Uist and, like many of the island’s younger population, moved to the mainland and beyond after school, co-founders Kate and Jonny returned to their island home in 2017 to set up the distillery and carve out a new life for themselves. Since then their small business has continued to grow, employing a dozen or so people locally and becoming an integral part of the community, not to mention winning a few gin awards along the way! In a region that is experiencing higher-than-average rates of population decline it’s great to see a vibrant new business like this opening up, providing job opportunities locally as well as being a fantastic addition to the Eat Drink Hebrides Trail.

The current North Uist Distillery line up includes their classic Downpour Scottish Dry Gin, along with a Pink Grapefruit Gin, Sloe & Bramble Gin, and a ready-to-drink Oak Aged Negroni. You can sample them all during a tasting session (£17.50 per person, book here) which also includes a tour of the historic Nunton Steadings building. Or, grab a gin of your choice from the on-site bar and while away the afternoon in a courtyard deckchair. For gifts and take-home bottles, the shop is well stocked with T-shirts, totes, miniatures, and more.

A stylishly wrapped botlle of Downpour Oak-Aged Negroni sat in the sand and ready to be enjoyed on a UIst beach

A stylishly wrapped bottle of Downpour Oak-Aged Negroni ready to be enjoyed on a beach in the Outer Hebrides



A botlle of Downpour Oak-Aged Negroni sat in the sand and ready to be enjoyed on a UIst beach

A bottle of Downpour Oak-Aged Negroni ready
to be enjoyed on a beach in the
Outer Hebrides



HOWMORE // SOUTH UIST

HOWMORE //

SOUTH UIST

Howmore is home to a number of traditional thatched cottages, as well as the ruins of various chapels dating from around 1200 AD. It’s a great spot for a quick wander, but if you fancy spending longer it’s also possible to stay at the atmospheric Howmore Hostel.

This whitewashed, thatched-roofed beauty is popular with those walking or cycling The Hebridean Way, providing basic accommodation in a beautiful setting. You can explore the historic ruins of the Teampull Mor Complex, a stone’s throw from the hostel, then head to the beach just a few hundred metres away, which stretches along the coast for miles.

The whitewashed, thatch-roofed traditional cottage that is the Howmore Hostel on South Uist

The whitewashed, thatch-roofed Howmore Hostel



The whitewashed, thatch-roofed traditional cottage that is the Howmore Hostel on South Uist

The whitewashed, thatch-roofed Howmore Hostel



TAIGH CHEARSABHAGH MUSEUM & ARTS CENTRE // LOCHMADDY, NORTH UIST

TAIGH CHEARSABHAGH MUSEUM & ARTS CENTRE //

LOCHMADDY, NORTH UIST

This arts and Gaelic culture centre hosts rotating exhibitions, as well as being home to a gift shop, a cafe, and the local post office. It’s a great place to retreat to on a rainy day, and the outdoor cafe deck is equally as inviting when the sun is shining. Entrance to the galleries are free, and there is a £3 charge for the heritage exhibition. Check what’s currently on via the Taigh Chearsabhagh website.

LONG ISLAND RETREATS // LOCH SKIPPORT, SOUTH UIST

LONG ISLAND RETREATS //

LOCH SKIPPORT, SOUTH UIST

For an insight into crofting heritage and day-to-day life on a working croft, join DJ and Lindsay for a tour from their home at Loch Skipport. Long Island Retreats offer a variety of experiences, from sheep shearing in July, to machair, croft, and island tours. They can even introduce you to a few of their Shetland ponies, a 50+ herd each with a name and character all of their own.

A windswept shetland pony with hair golden in the afternoon sun, on the road to Loch Skipport on South Uist

A windswept shetland pony on the road to Loch Skipport



A windswept shetland pony with hair golden in the afternoon sun, on the road to Loch Skipport on South Uist

A windswept shetland pony near Loch Skipport



SHORELINE STONEWARE // NORTH UIST

SHORELINE STONEWARE //

NORTH UIST

Shoreline Stoneware gallery and pottery showcases work from Uist-based artists and those with strong ties to the islands. It’s a great place to pick up a special piece of the Hebrides to take home.

UIST WOOL // GRIMSAY

UIST WOOL //

GRIMSAY

Wool production has been an important part of island life for centuries, and the tradition continues in style at Uist Wool on Grimsay. Using lovingly restored machinery dating back to the 19th century, Uist Wool produces high quality undyed yarns from native wool. Pop into their mill and wool centre to see the process in action, and to pick up beautifully crafted woollen goods.

BEST DAY TRIPS FROM UIST

DAY TRIPS FROM UIST

Although there is plenty to do on Uist, there are a few day trips we would highly recommend while visiting the islands.

DAY TRIP TO MINGULAY

Mingulay is an uninhabited island at the southern end of the Outer Hebrides. It is home to a large puffin colony, numerous other seabirds, a spectacular golden sand beach, the atmospheric ruins of an abandoned village, and some of the tallest sea cliffs in the British Isles. You can visit on a boat trip with Uist Sea Tours, departing from Eriskay Ferry Terminal. It takes around 1 hour to get to Mingulay, with the chance to spot dolphins and basking sharks on the way.

Aquamarine water meets golden sand on the shores of Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides, with two day trip boats anchored in the bay and the hills rising above the beach

The bay on Mingulay where you’ll arrive and go ashore



Aquamarine water meets golden sand on the shores of Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides, with two day trip boats anchored in the bay and the hills rising above the beach

Mingulay Bay, where you’ll arrive and go ashore



With no jetty or tourist infrastructure whatsoever on Mingulay, your island adventure starts with a scramble up the rocks, or perhaps a beach landing, whichever is considered safest on the day. You’ll have about 3 hours to explore Mingulay on foot, before returning to the boat for a spectacular trip around the sea cliffs and (weather permitting) through a huge natural sea arch.

A group of guillemots perch on a stone ledge on the sea cliffs of Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides

Guillemots hanging out on the sea cliffs of Mingulay



A group of guillemots perch on a stone ledge on the sea cliffs of Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides

Guillemots hanging out on the Mingulay sea cliffs



Between late April and early August, the puffin colony can be found on the grassy slopes to the northern side of the beach. The views from this spot are fantastic, looking out over turquoise water to the huge expanse of beach at Mingulay bay, backed by the ruined buildings of the village, abandoned in 1912. Sit quietly, wait patiently, and you’ll be rewarded with the incredible sight of puffins zooming around, popping in and out of their burrows to survey the land.

Two puffins in long grass on Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides

Outside their burrows



A puffin on a rocky ledge on Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides

A puffin on the rocky ledge above the bay



Two puffins in long grass on Mingulay in the Outer Hebrides

Puffins outside their burrows



Besides puffin encounters, Mingulay is also a great place to spot seals. They sometimes haul out in huge numbers on the beach, but you are most likely to see them frolicking around in the bay. You can wander around the remains of the village and the restored former school building, or head off on a longer hike up Cnoc Mhic-a-Phi (MacPhee’s Hill) (224 m), to the sheer cliffs of Biulacraig (Eagle Cliff), or up Carnan (273 m) or Hecla (219 m).

There are no toilets or other facilities on Mingulay. There is a natural water source, which should be boiled or treated before drinking. The terrain is uneven, and sturdy walking shoes are recommended. The weather can be very changeable, so you should pack waterproofs and warm clothing, as well as a hat, sunglasses, etc. Don’t forget to pack enough food and water for the 6 hour trip. There is no phone reception or data connection on the island. Tours cost £70 per person and run in good weather between approximately April and September.

See what a day trip to Mingulay is like in our Barra, Vatersay and Mingulay film below.

DAY TRIP TO ST KILDA

St Kilda is a small archipelago of rugged volcanic islands, sitting in the North Atlantic more than 40 miles west of Uist. These isolated isles are one of the few dual UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world, inscribed for both cultural and natural criteria.

A journey here is not for the faint hearted, with a 3 hour trip in each direction across often rough seas. But the reward for such an undertaking is the chance to witness tens of thousands of gannets circling above you, dive bombing the sea for their next catch. It’s the chance to imagine life 100 years ago for those who lived here, surviving largely off seabirds hunted by skilled cragsmen with heads for heights. And it’s the chance to feast your eyes upon the tallest sea cliffs and sea stacks in the British Isles, towering above you impressively as you bob around in the boat below. It’s a truly special place, and having made it as far as Uist, it’s well worth considering a day trip to St Kilda as well.

An amazing view of Boreray, Stac an Armin, and Stac Lee, rising from the water, seen from Hirta, the largest of the St Kilda islands

The view of Boreray, Stac Lee, and Stac an Armin from Hirta, the main island of St Kilda



An amazing view of Boreray, Stac an Armin, and Stac Lee, rising from the water, seen from Hirta, the largest of the St Kilda islands

A view of Boreray, Stac Lee, and Stac an Armin
from Hirta, the main island of St Kilda



You can visit St Kilda once a week on Mondays between April and September with Hebridean Sea Tours, departing from Eriskay Ferry Terminal (weather permitting). Note that the Eriskay pick up/drop off option is not mentioned on their main booking page, but you can select this option at the confirmation stage. It’s a full day trip, typically lasting more than 12 hours, and costs £205. Booking well in advance is highly recommended.

You can read more about the history and significance of St Kilda and get practical tips for a visit to the islands in our dedicated St Kilda Travel Guide, and see more from St Kilda in our film below.

LADY ANNE WILDLIFE WATCHING BOAT TRIP

Departing from Kallin Harbour on Grimsay and skippered by Nick, the Lady Anne departs a few times a week between approximately May and September for a 2 hour wildlife viewing trip around neighbouring Ronay island. You’ll have the chance to see otters, red deer, dolphins, seals, and a variety of seabirds, plus an almost guaranteed sighting of a white tailed sea eagle! More details are available via their website and Facebook page, and you can call Nick on +44(0)7305163700 to book a trip (£40 per person).

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UIST TRAVEL TIPS & PRACTICALITIES

In order to make your visit run smoothly, there are a few things to be aware of when planning a trip to Uist. We go into more detail below, but in general it’s good to know that services such shops, banks, and petrol stations are only available in larger community hubs, and that many places close or have reduced opening hours on Sundays. Check the ‘Uist Practicalities’ markers on our map above for the location of everywhere mentioned in this guide.

SHOPS

The largest supermarkets on Uist are MacLennan’s in Balivanich (Benbecula), and the two Co-ops at Creagorry (Benbecula) and Daliburgh (South Uist), both of which are the only supermarkets open between 6pm – 10pm on Sundays. There are also smaller shops at Sollas, Bayhead, and Lochmaddy on North Uist, at Carnan on South Uist, and on Berneray and Eriskay too.

FUEL STATIONS

You can fill up fuel at Lochmaddy and Bayhead on North Uist, at Balivanich and Creagorry on Benbecula, and at Daliburgh and Lochboisdale on South Uist. The Seaview Filling Station at Balivanich and the Crossroads Filling Station at Creagorry are both pay-at-the-pump and accessible 24/7.

ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING

There are a number of electric vehicle charging points throughout North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist, and Eriskay. We’ve marked the locations on our map.

ATMs

There are a limited number of ATMs on Uist, found in Lochmaddy, Balivanich, Daliburgh, and Lochboisdale. Many places will accept card payments but it’s best to have cash too, so ideally withdraw enough cash for the duration of your trip.

UIST PUBLIC TOILETS AND SHOWERS

There are public toilets available at each of the CalMac ferry terminals: Berneray (24/7), Lochmaddy, Lochboisdale, and Eriskay (24/7). There are also toilets at Bernerary Harbour and the visitor centre at Balranald RSPB Reserve.

PHONE SIGNAL AND WIFI

Phone signal and data connection is generally good throughout Uist, and free public WiFi is available at each of the CalMac Ferry Terminals. Many cafes and other establishments also offer WiFi.

DRIVING ON SINGLE TRACK ROADS

You will come across single track roads often while driving around Uist. These have regular passing places, allowing you to pass oncoming traffic or let cars behind you safely overtake. Be sure to read up on how to drive on single track roads in advance, and watch this short animation video for a great visual overview.


WHERE TO EAT ON UIST

There are a range of options when it comes to eating out on Uist, including community cafes, food trucks, hotel restaurants, and more. Fresh local seafood is particularly good. The below is not an exhaustive list of food options on the islands, rather our top suggestions for where to eat on Uist.

BERNERAY

Berneray Shop and Bistro | Classic cafe options for lunch, with a separate seafood-centred menu for dinner. Open May – September. Mon – Sat, 10am – 4pm (last orders 3pm for lunch), Dinner 6pm – 8.30pm (dinner reservations highly recommended – call +44 (0)1876 540288)

NORTH UIST

The Wee Cottage Kitchen | Food truck serving morning rolls, local seafood, sandwiches, hot drinks, baked goodies, etc. Open Mon – Sat, 10am – 3.30pm

The Dunes Cabin | Food truck operating out of the Balranald Hebridean Holidays campsite, next to RSPB Balranald. Hot rolls, local seafood, cakes, hot drinks, soup, etc. Open April – September: Tues – Fri, 11am – 3pm; Sat – Sun, 11am – 4pm

Kirkibost Cafe | Community cafe serving lunch, hot drinks, cakes, etc. Locally made preserves, chutneys, etc. sold via the onsite Hebridean Kitchen. Usually open Tues – Thurs, 11.30am – 2.30pm (check their Facebook page for updates)

Langass Lodge | Fine dining, including local seafood. Lunch Mon – Fri (& Sun), Brunch Sat, 10.30am – 2pm, Dinner from 6pm. Reservations essential – call +44(0)1876 580 285

The Wilder Kitchen | Unique dining experiences on the beach, prepared on open fires by Langass Lodge chef, William Hamer. Booking essential, limited dates. Check Instagram and Facebook for updates

Taigh Chearsabhagh Cafe | Cafe at the museum and arts centre in Lochmaddy, serving soup, toasties, cakes, hot drinks, etc. Outdoor deck and indoor seating. Mon – Sat, 10am – 4pm (last orders 3.30pm)

GRIMSAY

Namara | Fresh seafood including scallops, lobster, langoustine, and crab in a no-frills cafe environment. Good value for money. Open Tues – Thurs, 9am – 4pm; Fri, 9am – 7pm; Sat 10am – 7pm

BENBECULA

Charlie’s Bistro | Small restaurant focusing on local seafood and bistro classics. Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Mon – Thurs, 9am – 11pm; Fri, 9am – 1am; Sat, 10am – 1am. Advanced reservations for dinner recommended – call +44(0)1870 603242 

SOUTH UIST

Borrodale Hotel | Restaurant open to non-residents. Open 7 days, 11am – late. Reservations recommended. Call +44(0)1878 700444

Burnside Chip Shop | A petrol station that doubles up as a chippy! Decent fish suppers for takeaway only. Open Thurs – Sun, 8am – 7.30pm. Call +44(0)1878700184

Croft and Cuan | Takeaway food and good coffee at Lochboisdale pier, plus a mobile food truck attending events across Uist. Open Tues – Fri, 8am – 3pm; Sat, 10am – 3pm; Mon, 12pm – 3pm. Call +44(0)1878 700117

Polochar Inn | Hotel bar and restaurant open to non-residents, brunch and dinner menu. Reservations recommended. Call +44(0)1878 700215

Kilbride Cafe | Cafe with indoor and outdoor seating overlooking the southern coast, part of the Kilbride Campsite. Morning rolls, all-day breakfast, soup, sandwiches, etc. Open Mon – Sat, 8.30 – 3.30pm; Sun, 11am – 3pm. Call +44(0)1878 700008

ERISKAY

Am Politician | Bar and restaurant named after the ship of Whisky Galore fame. Food served 7 days, 12pm – 8pm. Advance reservations highly recommended. Call +44(0)1878 720246


VISIT MORE ISLANDS IN THE OUTER HEBRIDES

WHERE TO STAY ON UIST

There is a wide variety of accommodation options on Uist, from traditional inns and B&Bs, to glamping pods, hostels, and self-catering holiday homes. There are also a number of campsites, and wild camping is permitted in line with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code.

If you are travelling to Uist in a campervan, be sure to check this very handy pdf produced by Visit Outer Hebrides, listing chemical toilet disposal points, recycling points, and other places of relevance for campervanners. They have also created a map with similar info marked, which you can save to your own Google Maps account by tapping the star.

UIST HOSTELS AND BUNKHOUSES

BERNERAY

Berneray Hostel | Traditional white-washed and thatched roof houses on the coast. No advanced bookings taken. Cash/cheque only

John’s Bunkhouse | Modern bunkhouse built in a traditional style

NORTH UIST

The Tractor Shed Pods and Bunkhouse | Turf-roofed camping pods and bunkhouse, campervan pitches too

Moorcroft Holidays Hostel | Small hostel overlooking a tidal bay, with campsite and glamping pods too

BENBECULA

Nunton House Hostel | Large, historic building with four small en-suite dorm rooms

SOUTH UIST

Howmore Hostel | Traditional thatched-roof white-washed cottage next to historic church ruins. Run by the same organisation as Berneray Hostel. No advance bookings taken, cash/cheque only

Kilbride Hostel | Located next to Kilbride Campsite and Kilbride Cafe. Six en-suite rooms of various sizes

UIST GLAMPING PODS

NORTH UIST

Air a’ Chroit Luxury Pods | Two stylish pods with well appointed kitchenettes, bathrooms, and outdoor seating areas

Baleshare Bothies | Two cosy pods close to Baleshare Beach

Moorcroft Holidays Glamping | Three pods overlooking a tidal bay, sharing the grounds with the hostel and campsite

BENBECULA

The Wee Haven | A cosy pod with an outdoor decking area

SOUTH UIST

Uist Storm Pods | Two pods tucked into a hillside and overlooking a loch, close to Lochboisdale

ERISKAY

Beag Na Haun Pod | Attractive pod with outdoor deck overlooking a tidal bay

UIST B&Bs

NORTH UIST

The Fisherman’s Snug B&B | Cosy snug in a family home with separate entrance, kitchenette, and bathroom

Benview B&B | Two rooms in a luxury B&B plus a separate lodge (with hot tub!)

SOUTH UIST

Grianaig Guest House B&B | Modern, stylish B&B with four en-suite rooms

ERISKAY

An Taigh Mor B&B | Three en-suite rooms in a modern home set in a beautiful location overlooking the Sound of Barra

UIST HOTELS

NORTH UIST

Hamersay House | Small hotel and brasserie in Lochmaddy

Langass Lodge | Former shooting lodge with acclaimed restaurant

Temple View Hotel | Convenient location on main road at the southern end of North Uist

BENBECULA

Dark Island Hotel | Country-style hotel, bar, and restaurant

Isle of Benbecula House Hotel | Old-fashioned hotel on main road by Benbecula/South Uist causeway

SOUTH UIST

Borrodale Hotel | Traditional hotel and restaurant on main road leading through South Uist

Lochboisdale Hotel | Historic building overlooking Lochboisdale harbour

Polochar Inn | Beautiful location at southern end of South Uist, original inn dates from 1750. Lively bar, good restaurant, and great views

UIST SELF-CATERING ACCOMMODATION

NORTH UIST

Uist Forest Retreat | Unique accommodation in cabins hidden in the forest looking out towards Vallay tidal island

Seas The Day Lodge | Modern, stylish, self-contained lodge

BENBECULA

An Taigh Dubh | Restored blackhouse with thatched roof and modern interior

SOUTH UIST

Smiddy Cottage | Beautiful stone and thatched-roof cottage holiday home at the southern end of South Uist

UIST CAMPSITES

NORTH UIST

Clachan Sands Informal Campsite | Informal camping area on grass overlooking Clachan Sands (Traigh Hornais and Traigh Lingeigh). £10 per night, no facilities besides a bin and water tap. Popular with campervans

Balranald Campsite | Great location next to the beach and RSPB nature reserve, with The Dunes Cabin onsite

Moorcroft Holidays | Small campsite overlooking a tidal bay, also a hostel and glamping pods

BENBECULA

Otters Edge Campsite | Convenient and central location on Uist

SOUTH UIST

Kilbride Campsite |  Attractive location at southern end of South Uist, overlooking the Sound of Barra. Good cafe onsite, plus a hostel


UIST HOSTELS AND BUNKHOUSES

BERNERAY

Berneray Hostel | Traditional white-washed and thatched roof houses on the coast. No advanced bookings taken. Cash/cheque only

John’s Bunkhouse | Modern bunkhouse built in a traditional style

NORTH UIST

The Tractor Shed Pods and Bunkhouse | Turf-roofed camping pods and bunkhouse, campervan pitches too

Moorcroft Holidays Hostel | Small hostel overlooking a tidal bay, with campsite and glamping pods too

BENBECULA

Nunton House Hostel | Large, historic building with four small en-suite dorm rooms

SOUTH UIST

Howmore Hostel | Traditional thatched-roof white-washed cottage next to historic church ruins. Run by the same organisation as Berneray Hostel. No advance bookings taken, cash/cheque only

Kilbride Hostel | Located next to Kilbride Campsite and Kilbride Cafe. Six en-suite rooms of various sizes

UIST GLAMPING PODS

NORTH UIST

Air a’ Chroit Luxury Pods | Two stylish pods with well appointed kitchenettes, bathrooms, and outdoor seating areas

Baleshare Bothies | Two cosy pods close to Baleshare Beach

Moorcroft Holidays Glamping | Three pods overlooking a tidal bay, sharing the grounds with the hostel and campsite

BENBECULA

The Wee Haven | A cosy pod with an outdoor decking area

SOUTH UIST

Uist Storm Pods | Two pods tucked into a hillside and overlooking a loch, close to Lochboisdale

ERISKAY

Beag Na Haun Pod | Attractive pod with outdoor deck overlooking a tidal bay

UIST B&Bs

NORTH UIST

The Fisherman’s Snug B&B | Cosy snug in a family home with separate entrance, kitchenette, and bathroom

Benview B&B | Two rooms in a luxury B&B plus a separate lodge (with hot tub!)

SOUTH UIST

Grianaig Guest House B&B | Modern, stylish B&B with four en-suite rooms

ERISKAY

An Taigh Mor B&B | Three en-suite rooms in a modern home set in a beautiful location overlooking the Sound of Barra

UIST HOTELS

NORTH UIST

Hamersay House | Small hotel and brasserie in Lochmaddy

Langass Lodge | Former shooting lodge with acclaimed restaurant

Temple View Hotel | Convenient location on main road at the southern end of North Uist

BENBECULA

Dark Island Hotel | Country-style hotel, bar, and restaurant

Isle of Benbecula House Hotel | Old-fashioned hotel on main road by Benbecula/South Uist causeway

SOUTH UIST

Borrodale Hotel | Traditional hotel and restaurant on main road leading through South Uist

Lochboisdale Hotel | Historic building overlooking Lochboisdale harbour

Polochar Inn | Beautiful location at southern end of South Uist, original inn dates from 1750. Lively bar, good restaurant, and great views

UIST SELF-CATERING ACCOMMODATION

NORTH UIST

Uist Forest Retreat | Unique accommodation in cabins hidden in the forest looking out towards Vallay tidal island

Seas The Day Lodge | Modern, stylish, self-contained lodge

BENBECULA

An Taigh Dubh | Restored blackhouse with thatched roof and modern interior

SOUTH UIST

Smiddy Cottage | Beautiful stone and thatched-roof cottage holiday home at the southern end of South Uist

UIST CAMPSITES

NORTH UIST

Clachan Sands Informal Campsite | Informal camping area on grass overlooking Clachan Sands (Traigh Hornais and Traigh Lingeigh). £10 per night, no facilities besides a bin and water tap. Popular with campervans

Balranald Campsite | Great location next to the beach and RSPB nature reserve, with The Dunes Cabin onsite

Moorcroft Holidays | Small campsite overlooking a tidal bay, also a hostel and glamping pods

BENBECULA

Otters Edge Campsite | Convenient and central location on Uist

SOUTH UIST

Kilbride Campsite |  Attractive location at southern end of South Uist, overlooking the Sound of Barra. Good cafe onsite, plus a hostel


HOW TO GET TO UIST

You can get to Uist by sea (CalMac ferry) or by air (Loganair prop plane), with the ferry being by far the most common method of travel. Advance ferry reservations are recommended if you are travelling with a vehicle, especially during the peak summer season. Changes can be made free of charge online or by calling CalMac customer services.

FERRY FROM UIG TO LOCHMADDY (NORTH UIST)

The car ferry from Uig (pronounced oo-ig) on the Isle of Skye to Lochmaddy on North Uist takes around 1 hour 45 minutes, and makes the journey once or twice a day. There is a bridge connecting Skye to mainland Scotland.

Check the ferry schedule and make a reservation on the CalMac website.

FERRY FROM MALLAIG TO LOCHBOISDALE (SOUTH UIST)

The car ferry from Mallaig on mainland Scotland to Lochboisdale in South Uist takes 3 hours 30 minutes, departing once or twice a day.

Check the ferry schedule and make a reservation on the CalMac website.

FERRY FROM ARDMHOR (BARRA) TO ERISKAY

A car ferry connects Barra and Eriskay 5 times a day. It takes about 40 minutes to cross the Sound of Barra.

Check the ferry schedule and make a reservation on the CalMac website.

The Loch Alain, a CalMac car ferry, in port at Eriskay having just crossed the Sound of Barra from Ardmhor

The ferry at Eriskay, having just crossed the Sound of Barra from Ardmhor



The Loch Alain, a CalMac car ferry, in port at Eriskay having just crossed the Sound of Barra from Ardmhor

The ferry at Eriskay, having just crossed
the Sound of Barra from Ardmhor



FERRY FROM LEVERBURGH (HARRIS) TO BERNERAY

The car ferry between Harris and Berneray operates between three and five times a day. It takes about 1 hour to cross the Sound of Harris.

Check the ferry schedule and make a reservation on the CalMac website.

FLIGHTS TO BENBECULA

Loganair operates direct flights a few times a week from Glasgow to Benbecula (approx 1 hour journey time), and from Inverness with a touchdown in Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis (approx 3 hours 30 minutes total journey time). There is a max luggage allowance of 15 kg. You can compare flight options and prices via Skyscanner.

PLAN A TRIP ON THE NORTH COAST 500

HOW TO GET AROUND UIST

GET AROUND UIST

The most convenient way to get around Uist is by car, which you can hire on the island or bring on the ferry. Local hire companies include Car Hire Hebrides, Laing Motors, and Ask Car Hire.

There is a public bus service operating throughout the islands from Monday – Saturday (no Sunday service). You can check the bus timetables here.

Cycling is also a great way to get around. You can hire bikes (including electric bikes) from Heb E-Bike Hire on Grimsay, Bike Uist on North Uist, and Lasgair Bike Hire on South Uist. Or, bring your own on the ferry.

BEST THINGS TO DO ON UIST

We hope you enjoyed our guide to the best things to do on Uist. If you have any questions, drop them in the comments below, and if you’ve been before, we’d love to hear about your own experience on the islands.

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