• CAMPING THE JEJU OLLE TRAIL

    Everything You Need To Know

    A tent pitched in the grass behind Gwakji Beach on Jeju Island.
  • CAMPING THE JEJU OLLE TRAIL

    Everything You Need To Know

    A tent pitched in the grass behind Gwakji Beach on Jeju Island.

CAMPING THE JEJU OLLE TRAIL

Everything You Need To Know

The Jeju Olle Trail is a 425km network of walking trails circumnavigating Jeju Island in South Korea. The trail is divided into 26 routes. Some people take around a month to complete a thru-hike, while others tackle a few routes here and there. Accommodation is easy to come by, but for a unique experience we reckon camping the Jeju Olle Trail is by far the best way to see the island. 

Having walked the entire Olle Trail, we can safely say that many of our best Jeju memories are from our camp spots along the way. Fiery sunrises enjoyed in solitude. Waking to the sound of haenyeo diving right in front of our tent. Tranquil morning swims before the busloads of tourists arrived. Sipping peanut makgeolli under the stars. The list goes on.

Jeju is a hugely popular tourist destination, but we saw an altogether quieter side to it. That’s the beauty of camping, wild camping in particular. When the crowds have gone home, there’s nothing left but you and the island. 

  • A person watching the sea in the morning, sitting on the grass next to their tent on Sagye Beach while camping the Jeju Olle Trail
  • A person watching the sea in the morning, sitting on the grass next to their tent on Sagye Beach while camping the Jeju Olle Trail

On our first week long Olle camping adventure we were flying blind, having failed to source much useful information about Jeju camping at all. On our second month long thru-hike, we vowed to gather as much info as we could, determined to fill the Jeju camping advice void for future hikers. Essentially, we wanted to create the very post we would have been delighted to find when researching our own trip.  

So here you have it. Everything you need to know about camping the Jeju Olle Trail. 

The icing on the cake? A super useful map detailing 70 hand-picked camp spots along the trails. Access it online, or offline while hiking. Enjoy.

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Click the links below

Find the locations of 70 Jeju Olle Trail camp spots on the map below

To use an offline map with all the same Jeju Olle camp spots, first download Maps.Me (iOS/Android), then download our Jeju Camp Spots bookmarks.

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WHERE TO CAMP

There are a number of official campsites along the Olle Trail, mostly at beaches. Besides these, wild camping is your only option. 

Weather wise, the most pleasant times of the year to both hike and camp are Spring and Autumn. Summer is far too hot and humid, while Winter can get quite cold.

Official Campsites

A number of beaches along the Olle Trail have established campsites, although these are rarely found at the start or end of a route. Outside of peak summer season (July – late August) these can be pretty quiet, with just a few others using the space. Campsite shower and toilet blocks are only open during the summer, but you can expect to find a toilet open year-round, usually closer to the carpark. These campsites are basic and there is no fee to stay (although there may be a fee during peak summer season).

Camping Jeju Olle Trail at Gimnyeong Beach. A person packs away an orange tent on the grass behind the beach.

Packing up at the official Gimnyeong Beach Campsite in May


A tent sits on hard sand in front of tall palm trees with Geumneung Beach in the background.

Camping at the official campsite behind Geumneung Beach in June


Camping Jeju Olle Trail at Gimnyeong Beach. A person packs away an orange tent on the grass behind the beach.

Packing up at the official
Gimnyeong Beach Campsite in May


A tent sits on hard sand in front of tall palm trees with Geumneung Beach in the background.

Camping at the official campsite
behind Geumneung Beach in June


Beach campsites include those at Hamdeok (a little into Route 19), Gimnyeong (near the start of Route 20), Pyoseon (end Route 3/start Route 4), Hamo (near the end of Route 10), Geumneung/Hyeopjae (mid-way Route 14), Gwakji (mid-way Route 15-B) and Iho Taewoo (mid-way Route 17). There’s also an established campsite on tiny Biyangdo on Udo (mid-way Route 1-1).

Wild Camping

There are no hard and fast rules about wild camping on Jeju. There is no law, like in Scotland, allowing you the right to roam and pitch your tent on public land. Nor is there a law explicitly permitting you from such behaviour.  Ultimately, if you keep a low profile, follow the principles of Leave No Trace and remain respectful of private property, then you shouldn’t run into any problems. Locals are more likely to be curious and engage you in a quick chat than cause you any problems.

One of the best camping Jeju Olle Trail spots, a tent is pitched on the grass in front of the sea with Seongsan Ilchulbong in the background.

One of our favourite wild camp spots, with a view of Seongsan Ilchulbong near the end of Route 1


One of the best camping Jeju Olle Trail spots, a tent is pitched on the grass in front of the sea with Seongsan Ilchulbong in the background.

One of our favourite wild camp spots,
with a view of Seongsan Ilchulbong
near the end of Route 1


Resting Pagodas

A common feature on all of the Olle Trails is a wooden pagoda, or resting place. Often you’ll find these in picturesque locations, overlooking the sea or surrounded by greenery on top of an oreum. They make the perfect camp spot, assuming your tent is compatible with the required set up. As these pagodas are generally raised off the ground, with a flat wooden base, they are ideally suited to free-standing tents. Jeju is often windy though, so securing your tent further is advisable. We’ve seen locals wedging metal pegs in the gaps between the wooden planks, and tried this method successfully a few times ourselves. If your guy ropes are long enough you can also secure them to the beams around the pagoda, or peg them out all the way to the ground. We’ve also seen people using bungee cords to assist with securing the ropes. 

A resting pagoda is very useful when camping the Jeju Olle Trail. Here a tent is pitched in the centre of a pagoda, surrounded by grass and green trees witha lovely view.

One of the best Olle Trail pagoda camp spots, on Route 16. Private, spacious and one belter of  a view


A resting pagoda is very useful when camping the Jeju Olle Trail. Here a tent is pitched in the centre of a pagoda, surrounded by grass and green trees witha lovely view.

One of the best Olle Trail pagoda camp
spots, on Route 16. Private, spacious
and one belter of  a view


Regular Camp Spots

If your tent isn’t best suited to pitching up on a solid wooden platform, then camping on the ground is of course perfectly feasible. We opted for these kind of camp spots most nights, as we could peg the tent down more securely. As always, look for a flat patch of ground that’s not too hard, so you can get your pegs in easily. Ideally you’ll want a spot away from houses or buildings, and set back from any roads or paths to give you a bit of privacy.

  • A tent sits on flat grassy ground in front of the sea in the early morning light on Jeju Island
  • A tent sits on flat grassy ground in front of the sea in the early morning light on Jeju Island

CAMPING FACILITIES

When choosing your camp spot it’s important to consider ease of access to toilets, water and food. You’re unlikely to ever be too far from civilisation on Jeju, but a little pre-planning is often required.

Toilets

There are many public toilets along the Olle Trails, sometimes even playing you a wee tune while you tinkle. But while a number of the suggested camp spots we’ve marked on the map have toilets nearby, you can’t always rely on one. We certainly spent many nights camping without facilities close by. 

In these instances you’ll want to find somewhere that has a bit of cover (a bush, rock, ditch, etc.) where you can hide for a pee. Make sure you dispose of all of your toilet paper in a rubbish bag, and don’t leave any of it lying around. If you’re caught out needing a number 2, then of course this is a little trickier to deal with. You’ll need to hold on until you reach the next toilet, or dig a hole and bury it. We always carry a small camping trowel on our hikes for emergency hole digging situations. Again, be sure to carry out your toilet paper and bin it. A supply of biodegradable nappy bags are useful for this. 

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Water

Drinking water is widely available on Jeju and there is no need to buy bottled water. You’ll find drinking water fountains at a number of beaches, and water purifiers in almost every restaurant and cafe. Even if you’re not eating there, just pop in and ask/gesture to fill up your bottle. In our experience we were always welcome to do so. Tap water is also considered safe to drink. If you’re unsure, treat it with water purification tablets, a Steripen, or such like. You can get hot water from a dispenser at any convenience store (eg. 7 Eleven, GS25, CU). 

As you can’t always guarantee a nearby water source at your camp spot, be sure to plan ahead and fill up enough water in advance. It’s useful to walk with a 2-3L water bladder in your backpack, and have a water bottle or two spare for filling up easily on the move.

Food

It’s perfectly possible to camp every night on the Olle Trail and never once have to cook your own camp food. You’ll pass restaurants and convenience stores every day, and can plan your meals accordingly. Many of the camp spots we stayed at were within walking distance of a restaurant or store, otherwise we stopped to eat before walking on to our camp for the night. 

If you want true flexibility though, it’s best to carry enough food with you to cover dinner and breakfast. This way you can stop wherever and whenever you choose. There are some amazing places to camp, on top of an oreum, or by a particular stretch of beautiful coastline, where you’ll need to have enough to keep you going till you reach the next store.

  • A tent sits on top of the wooden viewing platform on Jeoji Oreum, one of the best places to stay when camping the Jeju Olle Trail
  • A tent sits on top of the wooden viewing platform on Jeoji Oreum, one of the best places to stay when camping the Jeju Olle Trail

We had to have enough food with us when we camped on Jeoji Oreum, before reaching a store the next morning

We had to have enough food with us when
we camped on Jeoji Oreum, before
reaching a store the next morning

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HOW TO FIND CAMP SPOTS

Luckily for you, we’ve pretty much done all the hard work for you on this front!

Use Our Maps

Walking the Olle Trail we marked every camp spot we stayed at, as well as potential camp spots we spied along the way. The Google map in this post contains a photo of most of these camp spots, the GPS coordinates and a little added info. You can view this online and use it to plan out your Jeju camping spots in advance.

We’re also sharing our Maps.me Jeju Camp Spots bookmarks. You can download this in the Maps.me app and view offline. This has all the same info, minus the photos. 

Of course, our camp spot recommendations are not an exhaustive list. But with 70 locations marked, you could easily plan your entire Olle Trail camping trip based solely on these.

Use Satellite View

If you want to look for alternative camping options, the best way to scout out camp spots in advance is to use satellite view. This is what we did every day in order to find our next Olle camp spot. Korean mapping apps Kakao (iOS/Android) and Naver (iOS/Android) are the best maps to consult. You can bring up the Olle route by searching ‘Jeju Olle ___’ to quickly find it, then zoom in on satellite view to look for potential camping locations. You can also use street view and air view to get a clearer picture of the area. We found Naver to be especially useful for this. You’ll soon start to recognise resting pagodas from above, grassy parks and other ideal camping spots. 

Of course, the photos may be old and the conditions may have changed (overgrown grass, a broken pagoda, etc.) but 95% of the time this method served us well.

We found a site across the road from this one on satellite view, a pagoda in a grassy spot by the road. But when we arrived, we found this lovely spot instead! It had looked rocky and unsuitable on the satellite map, but turned out to be much better and more private.



We found a site across the road from this
one on satelite view, but when we arrived
it was overgrown. Luckily
this spot, which
had looked only rocky on the map,
turned out to be much better

WHAT TO PACK

Besides the usual hiking gear, you’ll need to carry extra equipment if you plan on camping the Jeju Olle Trail. Here we outline exactly what you’ll need, plus recommendations for gear which we personally use and love. As you’ll be carrying everything with you on your hike, every gram counts. Ultralight gear will help you keep the weight down, which will in turn keep you happy on the trails.

You’ll need a comfortable backpack which holds at least 60L, possibly up to 80L depending on how light you can pack! We highly recommend Osprey backpacks with their Anti-Gravity (AG) back system. They are incredibly comfortable and do a great job of making a heavy load feel surprisingly light.

A person stands in front of a wall made of black volcanic rock, facing the sea and wearing a huge bag with a tent strapped to the bag for camping the Jeju Olle Trail

The latest version of the Osprey Aether 70L getting its maiden outing on the Olle Trail


A person stands in front of a wall made of black volcanic rock, facing the sea and wearing a huge bag with a tent strapped to the bag for camping the Jeju Olle Trail

The latest version of the Osprey Aether 70L
getting its maiden outing on the Olle Trail


CAMPING EQUIPMENT

Tent

You’ll want a lightweight, yet sturdy tent for handling that windy Jeju weather. As previously mentioned, it can be helpful to have a tent that can free stand, but it’s not essential. Make sure you have a groundsheet/footprint to go with the tent. This will protect it and keep it dry. We have the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL which we love, but can also recommend MSR’s Hubba Hubba. Thin circular pegs are best if you want to wedge them into wooden platforms when camping the Jeju Olle Trail. If you’re camping on rockier, tougher ground, then the 6 inch version of these pegs work best. It’s a good idea to have a supply of both.

A tent sits on the grass and sand with the sea in the background at a campsite you can stay at while camping the Jeju Olle Trail

Camping at Gwakji Beach on Route 15, tent
pegs snugly secure in the soft but firm sand


While camping the Jeju Olle Trail, two people sit on a bench next to their tent on Udo Island, watching birds on a rock at sea with the Jeju Island coastline in the distance

Camping on the west side of Udo, where the pegs needed
some encouragement on tougher, rockier ground


While camping the Jeju Olle Trail, two people sit on a bench next to their tent on Udo Island, watching birds on a rock at sea with the Jeju Island coastline in the distance

Camping on the west side of Udo, where
the pegs needed
some encouragement on
tougher, rockier ground


A tent sits on the grass and sand with the sea in the background at a campsite you can stay at while camping the Jeju Olle Trail

Camping at Gwakji Beach on Route 15, tent
pegs snugly secure in the soft but firm sand


Sleeping Mat

A bit of necessary padding between you and the ground will make for a warmer and more comfortable sleep while camping the Jeju Olle Trail. Personally we use Thermarest NeoAir XLite mats and would never consider any other mat these days. They pack down to the size of a water bottle, are very lightweight and extremely comfortable. Traditional roll mats are much bulkier and less comfortable (but cheaper!).

Sleeping Bag

Unless you’re hiking in the middle of summer (which is humid, hot and rainy) a sleeping bag is definitely advisable. Down sleeping bags give you the best weight to warmth ratio. They can pack down super small but tend to be expensive. Synthetic sleeping bags are much cheaper, but weigh more. We use Rab down sleeping bags because we often camp in much colder conditions than you’re likely to experience on Jeju (assuming you are camping in Spring or Autumn). To save space, we use these Sea To Summit compression dry sacks to make our sleeping bags as small as possible.

Two identical down sleeping bags sit side by side in different compression sacks for comparison, alongside a Nalgene Wide Mouth Tritan water bottle for scale

One of our Rab down sleeping bags in its standard stuff sack (left), and the same bag made smaller with the aid of a Sea To Summit compression dry sack (right). Plus a Nalgene for scale!


Two identical down sleeping bags sit side by side in different compression sacks for comparison, alongside a Nalgene Wide Mouth Tritan water bottle for scale

A Rab down sleeping bag made smaller with the
aid of a Sea To Summit compression dry sack


Silk Liner

This is very useful as temperatures can vary a lot, especially if you are hiking over the duration of a month. A silk sleeping bag liner can be used on its own when it’s hot, or inside your sleeping bag when it’s cold. Silk is a great material for keeping you cool when it’s hot, and warm when it’s cold. A liner is easy to wash and it helps keep your sleeping bag fresher too.

Pillow

You may be comfortable enough just rolling up some clothes, stuffing them in a bag and using this as a pillow. I, for one, am not! We love our inflatable camping pillows. They are super comfy, weigh next to nothing, and fit in the palm of our hands when packed away. 

COOKING EQUIPMENT

If you plan to cook for yourself while camping, you’ll need a few specific items.

Stove & Gas

A lightweight pocket stove is ideal. We use this one. It’s easy to come by the type of gas canister required for such a pocket stove in convenience stores and supermarkets on Jeju. You can pick one up when you arrive (you can’t fly with one).

Pot, Bowl, Cup & Cutlery

You’ll need some basic cooking equipment and cutlery. A set like this is ideal, including a pot, spoon, spork and bowl. Personally, we use a collapsible set (which includes cups) to save space. We also love our collapsible coffee dripper.

Washing Up

Don’t forget dish soap and something to scrub your dishes with!

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AROUND CAMP

There’s a few extra things we can recommend packing to make your camping experience as smooth as possible.

Headtorch

For seeing in the dark and keeping both hands free in the process. We use rechargeable models which work great.

Camping Mat

If it’s wet, dewy, sandy or dirty then you’ll appreciate having a mat to lay out all your stuff on while setting up/packing up camp. Also great for sitting on and relaxing at the end of the day!

Pen Knife

Multi-functional and useful day-in-day-out.

Power Bank

You can charge up your electronics at cafes and restaurants along the way, but when camping the Jeju Olle Trail, having a power bank is a good idea to keep your batteries charged at all times. Anker are our preferred.

Solar Panel

This is a great solution for keeping your electronics charged up on the move (assuming it’s a sunny day!). We’ve been using the Anker 21W PowerPort Solar for a couple of years now and love it.

Water Bottle

As mentioned before, having a reusable water bottle at hand is ideal for filling up on the go and using around camp. We love our Nalgene Tritan Wide Mouth bottles.

Scrubba For Laundry

If you’re planning on walking for more than just a few days, you’re going to have to think about how and where to wash your clothes. Introducing The Scrubba!



We love this thing. It’s a portable washing machine that makes doing laundry on the go super easy, quick, and mess-free. You pop your dirty clothes in the bag, add suds and water, then roll and clip it shut. Open the valve to release excess air, then rub your hands back and forth, scrubbing the clothes against the internal knobbly washboard. Empty out the dirty water, rinse with clean water, and hang up your clothes to dry. Or dangle them off your backpack while you walk. It’s genius.

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Travel Towel

You can’t do without a travel towel while camping the Jeju Olle Trail. A lightweight microfibre towel is ideal for drying off after a swim or wash.

Rubbish Bags, Toilet Paper, Pocket Trowel & Hand Sanitiser

Make sure to have a supply of small disposable bags so you can carry your rubbish with you to the nearest bin.

Public toilets are usually stocked up with toilet paper, but can run out. Also, you may need it on those odd occasions when there’s no toilet around.

A pocket trowel is needed for digging a toilet hole if necessary. We always carry this lightweight one with us.

Hand sanitiser is the easiest way to keep your hands clean and healthy on the trail.

First Aid Kit

An all purpose kit is ideal. You can pick up general medical supplies at stores or pharmacies along the way but it’s a good idea to have Compeed blister pads or similar, antihistamines, ibuprofen, rehydration salts, etc., on you. There won’t always be a pharmacy close by.

Bug Spray

Mosquitos and other bugs can be a nuisance. Don’t forget your bug spray!

TOP TIP

Ticks can be a problem, especially in Spring, so be sure to use insect repellent and check yourself for ticks daily. There are a number of insect repellent stations dotted around the island at trailheads and some Jeju Olle stamp spots. These are free to use – just pick up the spray gun, press the button on the front of the machine, and spray yourself. 


HIKING GEAR

Packing and wearing the right hiking gear will also help you keep your weight to a minimum. We’ve included a checklist below, just expand the box for the full list and our personal recommendations. 

The most important bit of advice we can give you is to opt for merino wool T-Shirts. It keeps you cool when it’s hot and warm when it’s cool, and amazingly, won’t stink even after days of wear. It will dry relatively fast too. Also, break in your hiking boots before your walk! Blisters and hot spots can really ruin your trip.

 Hiking In Spring Or Autumn

PACKING LIST

Merino T-Shirts x 2
His/Hers

Merino Underwear
His/Hers

Sports Bra x 2

Fleece
His/Hers

Rain Jacket/Shell
His/Hers

Waterproof Trousers
His/Hers

Quick Drying Hiking Trousers (preferably with zip-off shorts)
His/Hers

Trousers to wear around camp
(Lightweight, similar to above)

Trekking Socks x 2
His/Hers

Warm Socks to wear at night x 1

Buff

Sun Hat

Sunglasses

Hiking Boots
His/Hers

Flipflops/waterproof sandals for evening or the beach

Bandana
Soak it and tie it round your neck or wrists to keep you cool

Belt
You might lose weight on the trail!

 Hiking In Winter Or Early Spring? Pack These Items Too

PACKING LIST

Merino Thermal Baselayer

His/Hers

Merino Thermal Leggings

His/Hers

Down Jacket

His/Hers

Gloves

Liner & Waterproof Outer

Warm Hat


PROS & CONS OF CAMPING THE JEJU OLLE TRAIL

Camping on the Jeju Olle Trail is by no means a necessity. It is, rather, a deliberate choice made by some (but not most!) Olle walkers. There are benefits and drawbacks to camping along the way, so if you’re weighing up the options, let us share our thoughts on the matter.

THE PROS

Experience More Of Jeju

Perhaps the biggest draw of camping our way along the Olle was the opportunity to experience an authentic side of Jeju. Those precious moments when we felt connected to the island and the environment around us. No tourists. No selfie sticks. No noise. Just us and the sound of the ocean, or the chirping of birds. Our daily rhythm fell in sync with nature, going to bed when it got dark and rising with the sun. We glimpsed aspects of island life that we otherwise would have missed. Those haenyeo diving at daybreak. Locals setting about their dawn exercise routine. Sri Lankan fishery workers collecting wild herbs at dusk. Countless conversations were had with passersby, each one offering us an insight into that little corner of the island.

  • A haenyeo diving in the sea at daybreak, a scene you can see when camping the Jeju Olle Trail
  • A haenyeo diving in the sea at daybreak, a scene you can see when camping the Jeju Olle Trail

A Continuous Journey

Camping also allowed us to experience Jeju Olle Trail as one continuous journey. Every day we started where we’d stopped, having watched the world around us change from day to night and back again. On the few occasions we didn’t camp (due to adverse weather), the act of taking a bus, staying in a hotel, and bussing back to the trail again, left us feeling disconnected and out of sorts. It made us appreciate camping all the more.

Camping Is Free

The other big advantage of camping, is that it’s free. If you’re on a tight budget, camping will save you between ₩15,000 – ₩30,000 per day. That’s on a per person basis. Add that money up over a month long thru-hike and it’s quite the saving!

THE CONS

Extra Weight To Carry

The most obvious drawback of camping on the Olle Trail is the extra weight you’ll need to carry. If you opt for staying in accommodation, you can hike with a lightweight daypack each day. If you’re camping, you’ll likely have between 15-20kg on your back. This will make you slower, add extra strain on your body and make those oreum ascents feel even tougher! But who said slower was worse? And there’s a certain satisfaction that comes with knowing you’ve completed the trail with your home on your back. 

  • A person with a heavy backpack stands on top of an oreum while hiking and camping the Jeju Olle Trail
  • A person with a heavy backpack stands on top of an oreum while hiking and camping the Jeju Olle Trail

Keeping Clean

The lack of showers is also a challenge to be reckoned with. Walking for days on end and working up a sweat can leave you feeling pretty grotty. While the sea is a constant temptation, it can be rather chilly outside of mid-July to mid-September, making a dip in the ocean extra…hmmm…refreshing. Planned stops at a local jjimjilbang (traditional Korean bathhouse and sauna) are a great way to overcome the dirt though.

The Weather

Changeable weather is also a factor to consider when planning a camping trip on Jeju. Strong wind and rain will certainly dampen your spirits and make camping a pretty miserable experience. The good news though is that the extensive local bus network and plentiful accommodation options make it easy to change plans last minute. We had three spells of bad weather during our month on Jeju, each time jumping on Booking.com and sorting out a hotel or pension last minute. We then used Kakao Maps to locate the nearest bus stop and navigate to our home for the night.

OUR OPINION?

With all that said, I think you might have guessed that we favour the benefits of camping over the inconveniences. It offers a unique experience of the island, one we’re sure will leave you with wonderful memories.

CAMPING THE JEJU OLLE TRAIL

Well, that’s the lot. If there’s anything we haven’t covered, or if you have any questions at all, leave a comment below and we’ll be happy to get back to you. Hiking and camping the Jeju Olle Trail was a special and memorable experience for us. We hope it’ll be the same for you.

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A person with a heavy backpack stands on top of an oreum while hiking and camping the Jeju Olle Trail

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Camp & hike 425KM around beautiful Jeju Island, South Korea! Find out everything you need to know for planning your camping Olle Trail adventure. Includes online & offline maps with 70 camp spots, packing advice & tips for the trail. Thru-hike the whole Olle Trail over a month, or walk & camp a shorter section. Experience the very best of Jeju Island with our recommended wild camp spots & favourite beach camp sites. #Camping #Hiking #Korea #Jeju
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