• EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

  • EVEREST BASE CAMP

    TREK GUIDE

    Mobile header image for the Everest Base Camp trek guide, featuring a trekker walking on a rocky trail with mountain peaks in the distance

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE

In this guide we cover everything you need to know about the Everest Base Camp Trek in Nepal. This includes suggested itineraries and practical information about accommodation, costs, what to pack, independent vs. guided treks, transport, and more. We also offer a route map with GPX download for use on the trek. And along with this written guide, we also share ‘silent hiking’ films that work well as a visual guide to the trail.

A chance for an adventurous and exciting journey, the Everest Base Camp Trek serves up spectacular scenery and gets you close to the world’s highest mountains, and as one of Nepal’s best known treks, it attracts people of all ages and experience levels. The trek ascends to high altitude (5000 m +) and is challenging, but it is achievable with a sensible itinerary that includes proper acclimatisation. Read on to discover more and start planning your own EBC trek.

Use the drop down menu below to jump to each section of this guide

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EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK OVERVIEW

    • DISTANCE | 120 -143 km depending on route taken (incl. acclimatisation/day hikes)
    • DURATION | 12 – 15 days depending on route (incl. flying to/from Lukla)
    • START/END | Lukla
    • PERMITS REQUIRED | Khumbu Trek Card 2000 NPR; Sagarmatha National Park Fee 3000 NPR (SAARC nationals 1500 NPR / Nepali nationals 100 NPR)
    • TREKKING SEASON | Best Seasons: April to Mid-May, October to Mid-November; Shoulder Seasons: March, Late May, September, Mid-November to December; Avoid: June to August, January to February
    • TREK DIFFICULTY | Moderate (challenging if including Kongma La or Gokyo Lakes)
    • ELEVATION GAIN/LOSS | +/- approx 7600 metres (Classic EBC Trek incl. acclimatisation/day hikes)
    • MAX ALTITUDE | 5611 m (Kala Patthar) 
    • GUIDE MANDATORY? | Khumbu Pasanglhamu Rural Municipality has stated that it is NOT mandatory to trek with a guide in the Khumbu region
    • ACCOMMODATION | Teahouses/Guesthouses in villages along the trail
    • TREK COST | $35 – $144 USD per person, per day (budget independent trekker to fully inclusive package)
    • RECOMMENDED TREKKING AGENCY | Himalayan Masters, Quote HOGG5 for 5% discount

EVEREST THREE PASSES TREK OVERVIEW

DISTANCE
120 -143 km
depending on route taken
(incl. acclimatisation/day hikes)

DURATION
12 – 15 days
depending on route taken
(incl. flying to/from Lukla)

START/END
Lukla

PERMITS REQUIRED
Khumbu Trek Card 2000 NPR
Sagarmatha National Park Fee 3000 NPR (SAARC nationals 1500 NPR, Nepali nationals 100 NPR)

TREKKING SEASON
Best
Season
April to Mid-May
October to Mid-November
Shoulder Seasons
March, Late May, September
Mid-November to December
Months To Avoid
June, July, August
January and February

TREK DIFFICULTY
Moderate
(challenging if including
Kongma La or Gokyo Lakes)

ELEVATION GAIN/LOSS
+/- approx 7600 metres
(Classic EBC Trek incl.
acclimatisation/day hikes)

MAX ALTITUDE
5611 m (Kala Patthar)

GUIDE MANDATORY?
Khumbu Pasanglhamu Rural Municipality has stated that it is NOT mandatory to trek with a guide in the Khumbu region

ACCOMMODATION
Teahouses/Guesthouses in villages along the trail

TREK COST
$35 – $145 USD
 per person, per day (budget independent trekker to fully inclusive package)

OUR RECOMMENDED TREKKING AGENCY
Himalayan Masters, Quote HOGG5 for 5% discount


EVEREST BASE CAMP TREKKING FILMS

Get a sense of the Everest Base Camp trekking route in our ‘silent hiking’ style ambient films.





EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK MAP & GPX DOWNLOAD

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

MAP & GPX DOWNLOAD

We have created a detailed Everest Base Camp trekking map to accompany this guide. It shows the Classic Everest Base Camp trekking route along with the alternative routes outlined in this guide, going via Khumjung and Phorste, Kongma La, and Cho La and Gokyo Lakes. The main side/acclimatisation hike options are included too, and the overland route between Salleri and Lukla is also marked.

Detailed stats and an elevation profile are included for each route section. Guesthouse settlements and tea shops are also marked, as well as key sights and practical info such as checkpoints, hospitals, and transport hubs. Guesthouses as per our own trek itinerary are marked, including info about prices and services, phone numbers (where possible), and a copy of the menu. Photos are included with almost every pin. 

You can use the digital map online, or download it for offline use with a mapping app such as Organic Maps, Maps.me or Gaia GPS. This is very helpful for navigation assistance on the trail. It allows you to quickly pinpoint key places and services along the way and calculate distances and elevation differences between destinations.

Note that while we’ve tried to be as accurate as possible when recording and mapping the route, changes on the ground are inevitable (especially on routes crossing glaciers) and this map should not be solely relied upon for navigation.

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK ELEVATION PROFILE

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

ELEVATION PROFILE

The image below shows the elevation profile of the Classic Everest Base Camp trek, starting and ending in Lukla. The route shown here includes the various acclimatisation and side hikes as outlined in the suggested itinerary below. Elevation is displayed in metres and distance in kilometres.

Elevation profile for the Everest Base Camp Trek in Nepal, including the standard acclimatisation and side hikes

3D ROUTE MAP

Watch our 3D relief map video to visualise the landscape and get a sense of the Everest Base Camp trek.


EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK ITINERARY

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

ITINERARY OPTIONS

There is more than one trekking route to Everest Base Camp. In this section we outline the Classic EBC trek itinerary, but also include three alternative itineraries which enable you to vary your route on the way to and from Base Camp and see much more of the Khumbu region.  

We have created an overview table for each of the Everest Base Camp trek itinerary options. These include trekking distances and approximate trekking times for each day (excluding lunch stops, breaks, etc), as well as stats on elevation gain/loss and sleeping altitude. For each itinerary the assumption is that you will fly into Lukla on the morning of Day 1 and start trekking. You will need to add 3 – 5 days if you plan to travel overland from Kathmandu to Lukla or vice versa. 

It is also possible to combine the following itineraries to create your own alternative EBC trek. For example, you could trek via Khumjung, Phortse and Kongma La on the way to EBC, or you could include both Kongma La and Gokyo Lakes. A few minor possible alternatives along the way are noted below each itinerary, such as alternate overnight stops.

If viewing the itinerary tables on a mobile device or tablet, scroll to the right to see the full table or flip your screen to landscape mode

CLASSIC EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK ITINERARY

A classic Everest Base Camp trek itinerary is 11 nights/12 days, following the exact same route on the way to and from EBC. If you have limited time, this is the shortest itinerary you can follow while sticking to safe altitude ascent rates.

DAYROUTEDISTANCE & TIME

ELEVATION GAINELEVATION LOSSSLEEP ALTITUDE
DAY 1*LUKLA →
PHAKDING
7.5 km
2.5 hours
472 m687 m2640 m
DAY 2
PHAKDING →
NAMCHE BAZAAR
10.2 km
5 hours
1628 m
851 m3425 m
DAY 3NAMCHE BAZAAR
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5.6 km – 9.1 km
3 – 6 hours
550 – 740 m550 – 740 m3425 m
DAY 4**NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ TENGBOCHE
9.5 km
4.5 hours
1197 m753 m3860 m
DAY 5TENGBOCHE
→ DINGBOCHE
9.9 km
4 hours
944 m513 m4300 m
DAY 6NANGKARTSHANG
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5 km
4 hours
766 m766 m4300 m
DAY 7DINGBOCHE
→ LOBUCHE
7.8 km
4.5 hours
773 m151 m4920 m
DAY 8
(Part 1)
LOBUCHE →
GORAK SHEP
4.5 km
2.5 hours
316 m70 m5160 m
DAY 8
(Part 2)
***
KALA PATTHAR
(Return Hike)
3.8 km
3.5 hours
495 m495 m5160 m
DAY 9
(Part 1)
***
GORAK SHEP →
EVEREST BASE CAMP
(Return Hike)
6.3 km
2.5 hours
255 m255 m
DAY 9
(Part 2)
GORAK SHEP
→ PHERICHE
11.6 km
4.5 hours
110 m1022 m4250 m
DAY 10PHERICHE
→ NAMCHE BAZAAR
19.2 km
7 hours
1298 m2130 m3425 m
DAY 11NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ LUKLA
17.8 km
6 hours
1571 m2133 m2865 m
DAY 12FLY LUKLA →
KATHMANDU/
MANTHALI
20 – 30 mins1400 m

*Alternatively, continue to Monjo (2830 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 5.1 km, approx 2 hours trekking time). Doing this means the trail will be less busy for both your Phakding to Monjo section, and the Monjo to Namche section the following morning.


**Alternatively, continue to Pangboche (3950 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 4.2 km, approx 1.5 hours trekking time). Pangboche is a lovely village with fantastic views of Ama Dablam, and there are many guesthouses. Tengboche, on the other hand, only has two guesthouses and it can be difficult to get a room here in peak season. Continuing to Pangboche also means the trail will be less busy for both your Tengboche to Pangboche section, and the Pangboche to Dingboche section the following morning.


***On days 8 and 9 the classic itinerary that most people follow is to visit EBC after lunch at Gorak Shep, then hike up Kala Patthar in the dark for sunrise the next morning (when it is bitterly cold). If you swap these two around as per the above suggested itinerary, you are guaranteed to have a less busy experience at both EBC and on the trail up Kala Patthar. As the skies are usually clearer in the morning you are also likely to have better views at EBC, however it is possible that the views from Kala Patthar will be obscured by afternoon clouds. If you’re lucky and have clear afternoon skies, then you will be treated to a fiery sunset glow on Everest and the surrounding mountains. If you hike up Kala Patthar in the morning, your mountain views will be brief as the sun rises directly behind Everest and you’ll soon be looking directly into the sun.


ALTERNATIVE EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK ITINERARY VIA KHUMJUNG AND PHORTSE

Our first alternative Everest Base Camp trek itinerary is 12 nights/13 days. This itinerary follows a different route between Namche Bazaar and Pangboche on the way to EBC, by trekking via Khumjung and Phortse. The overall difficulty of this route remains moderate, and the additional day allows you to explore more of the region and gives more time for acclimatisation. It’s also a great option for avoiding crowds during the peak trekking seasons, as far fewer people trek this alternative route.

DAYROUTEDISTANCE & TIME

ELEVATION GAINELEVATION LOSSSLEEP ALTITUDE
DAY 1*LUKLA →
PHAKDING
7.5 km
2.5 hours
472 m687 m2640 m
DAY 2
PHAKDING →
NAMCHE BAZAAR
10.2 km
5 hours
1628 m
851 m3425 m
DAY 3NAMCHE BAZAAR
(Acclimatisation Day)
Flexible
(see ‘Trek Summary’)
3425 m
DAY 4NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ KHUMJUNG
4 km
2 hours
547 m175 m3790 m
DAY 5KHUMJUNG
→ PHORTSE
7 km
5 hours
772 m754 m3800 m
DAY 6PHORTSE → DINGBOCHE 11.6 km
5.5 hours
1413 m925 m4300 m
DAY 7NANGKARTSHANG
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5 km
4 hours
766 m766 m4300 m
DAY 8DINGBOCHE
→ LOBUCHE
7.8 km
4.5 hours
773 m151 m4920 m
DAY 9
(Part 1)
LOBUCHE →
GORAK SHEP
4.5 km
2.5 hours
316 m70 m5160 m
DAY 9
(Part 2)
**
KALA PATTHAR
(Return Hike)
3.8 km
3.5 hours
495 m495 m5160 m
DAY 10
(Part 1)
**
GORAK SHEP →
EVEREST BASE CAMP
(Return Hike)
6.3 km
2.5 hours
255 m255 m
DAY 10
(Part 2)
GORAK SHEP
→ PHERICHE
11.6 km
4.5 hours
110 m1022 m4250 m
DAY 11PHERICHE
→ NAMCHE BAZAAR
19.2 km
7 hours
1298 m2130 m3425 m
DAY 12NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ LUKLA
17.8 km
6 hours
1571 m2133 m2865 m
DAY 13FLY LUKLA →
KATHMANDU/
MANTHALI
20 – 30 mins1400 m

*Alternatively, continue to Monjo (2830 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 5.1 km, approx 2 hours trekking time). Doing this means the trail will be less busy for both your Phakding to Monjo section, and the Monjo to Namche section the following morning.


**On days 8 and 9 the classic itinerary that most people follow is to visit EBC after lunch at Gorak Shep, then hike up Kala Patthar in the dark for sunrise the next morning (when it is bitterly cold). If you swap these two around as per the above suggested itinerary, you are guaranteed to have a less busy experience at both EBC and on the trail up Kala Patthar. As the skies are usually clearer in the morning you are also likely to have better views at EBC, however it is possible that the views from Kala Patthar will be obscured by afternoon clouds. If you’re lucky and have clear afternoon skies, then you will be treated to a fiery sunset glow on Everest and the surrounding mountains. If you hike up Kala Patthar in the morning, your mountain views will be brief as the sun rises directly behind Everest and you’ll soon be looking directly into the sun.


EVEREST BASE CAMP VIA KONGMA LA TREK ITINERARY

Our second alternative Everest Base Camp trek itinerary is 13 nights/14 days. This changes the route taken between Dingboche and Lobuche on the way to EBC by crossing a high pass called Kongma La (5514 m). This section is more challenging than the rest of the route, but it offers incredible scenery and the chance to explore much quieter sections of trail than you’ll experience on the classic EBC route.

DAYROUTEDISTANCE & TIME

ELEVATION GAINELEVATION LOSSSLEEP ALTITUDE
DAY 1* LUKLA →
PHAKDING
7.5 km
2.5 hours
472 m687 m2640 m
DAY 2
PHAKDING →
NAMCHE BAZAAR
10.2 km
5 hours
1628 m
851 m3425 m
DAY 3NAMCHE BAZAAR
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5.6 km – 9.1 km
3 – 6 hours
550 – 740 m550 – 740 m3425 m
DAY 4**NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ TENGBOCHE
9.5 km
4.5 hours
1197 m753 m3860 m
DAY 5TENGBOCHE
→ DINGBOCHE
9.9 km
4 hours
944 m513 m4300 m
DAY 6NANGKARTSHANG
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5 km
4 hours
766 m766 m4300 m
DAY 7DINGBOCHE
→ CHUKHUNG
5 km
2.5 hours
451 m19 m4730 m
DAY 8
***
CHUKHUNG RI
(Acclimatisation Hike)
4.9 km – 5.9 km
3 – 5 hours
645 – 810 m645 – 810 m4730 m
DAY 9CHUKHUNG
→ KONGMA LA
→ LOBUCHE
9.8 km
8 hours
973 m792 m4920 m
DAY 10
(Part 1)
LOBUCHE →
GORAK SHEP
4.5 km
2.5 hours
316 m70 m5160 m
DAY 10
(Part 2)
****
KALA PATTHAR
(Return Hike)
3.8 km
3.5 hours
495 m495 m5160 m
DAY 11
(Part 1)
****
GORAK SHEP →
EVEREST BASE CAMP
(Return Hike)
6.3 km
2.5 hours
255 m255 m
DAY 11
(Part 2)
GORAK SHEP
→ PHERICHE
11.6 km
4.5 hours
110 m1022 m4250 m
DAY 12PHERICHE
→ NAMCHE BAZAAR
19.2 km
7 hours
1298 m2130 m3425 m
DAY 13NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ LUKLA
17.8 km
6 hours
1571 m2133 m2865 m
DAY 14FLY LUKLA →
KATHMANDU/
MANTHALI
20 – 30 mins1400 m

*Alternatively, continue to Monjo (2830 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 5.1 km, approx 2 hours trekking time). Doing this means the trail will be less busy for both your Phakding to Monjo section, and the Monjo to Namche section the following morning.


**Alternatively, continue to Pangboche (3950 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 4.2 km, approx 1.5 hours trekking time). Pangboche is a lovely village with fantastic views of Ama Dablam, and there are many guesthouses. Tengboche, on the other hand, only has two guesthouses and it can be difficult to get a room here in peak season. Continuing to Pangboche also means the trail will be less busy for both your Tengboche to Pangboche section, and the Pangboche to Dingboche section the following morning.


***There are two viewpoints on the Chukhung Ri acclimatisation hike, the lower one (5380 m) which most people visit and the higher one (5516 m) which involves a tough and steep climb towards the end.


****On days 8 and 9 the classic itinerary that most people follow is to visit EBC after lunch at Gorak Shep, then hike up Kala Patthar in the dark for sunrise the next morning (when it is bitterly cold). If you swap these two around as per the above suggested itinerary, you are guaranteed to have a less busy experience at both EBC and on the trail up Kala Patthar. As the skies are usually clearer in the morning you are also likely to have better views at EBC, however it is possible that the views from Kala Patthar will be obscured by afternoon clouds. If you’re lucky and have clear afternoon skies, then you will be treated to a fiery sunset glow on Everest and the surrounding mountains. If you hike up Kala Patthar in the morning, your mountain views will be brief as the sun rises directly behind Everest and you’ll soon be looking directly into the sun.


EVEREST BASE CAMP AND GOKYO LAKES TREK ITINERARY

Our third alternative Everest Base Camp trek itinerary is 14 nights/15 days. This varies the route taken between Lobuche and Namche Bazaar on the way back from EBC, by crossing a high pass called Cho La (5368 m) and descending via the spectacular Gokyo Lakes. Again, this route is more challenging than the classic or first alternative EBC itineraries we suggest, due to the extra distance and overall elevation gain. However, it is a highly rewarding trek which includes some of the most spectacular locations in the Khumbu region. The sections of trail that you must repeat on the way to and from EBC are kept to an absolute minimum on this itinerary.

DAYROUTEDISTANCE & TIME

ELEVATION GAINELEVATION LOSSSLEEP ALTITUDE
DAY 1*LUKLA →
PHAKDING
7.5 km
2.5 hours
472 m687 m2640 m
DAY 2
PHAKDING →
NAMCHE BAZAAR
10.2 km
5 hours
1628 m
851 m3425 m
DAY 3NAMCHE BAZAAR
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5.6 km – 9.1 km
3 – 6 hours
550 – 740 m550 – 740 m3425 m
DAY 4**NAMCHE BAZAAR
→ TENGBOCHE
9.5 km
4.5 hours
1197 m753 m3860 m
DAY 5TENGBOCHE
→ DINGBOCHE
9.9 km
4 hours
944 m513 m4300 m
DAY 6NANGKARTSHANG
(Acclimatisation Hike)
5 km
4 hours
766 m766 m4300 m
DAY 7DINGBOCHE
→ LOBUCHE
7.8 km
4.5 hours
773 m151 m4920 m
DAY 8
(Part 1)
LOBUCHE →
GORAK SHEP
4.5 km
2.5 hours
316 m70 m5160 m
DAY 8
(Part 2)
***
KALA PATTHAR
(Return Hike)
3.8 km
3.5 hours
495 m495 m5160 m
DAY 9
(Part 1)
***
GORAK SHEP →
EVEREST BASE CAMP
(Return Hike)
6.3 km
2.5 hours
255 m255 m
DAY 9
(Part 2)
GORAK SHEP
→ DZONGLHA
11.1 km
4 hours
298 m633 m4825 m
DAY 10DZONGLHA
→ CHO LA
→ DRAGNAG
8.6 km
6 hours
653 m803 m4680 m
DAY 11DRAGNAG
→ GOKYO
3.8 km
3 hours
184 m112 m4750 m
DAY 12
(Part 1)
GOKYO RI
(Return Hike)
3.6 km
3 hours
605 m605 m4020 m
DAY 12
(Part 2)
GOKYO
→ DOLE
12.5 km
4 hours
295 m1008 m4020 m
DAY 13 DOLE
→ MONJO
17 km
7 hours
1360 m2579 m3800 m
DAY 14MONJO
→ LUKLA
12.6 km
4 hours
1155 m1123 m2865 m
DAY 15FLY LUKLA →
KATHMANDU/
MANTHALI
20 – 30 mins

*Alternatively, continue to Monjo (2830 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 5.1 km, approx 2 hours trekking time). Doing this means the trail will be less busy for both your Phakding to Monjo section, and the Monjo to Namche section the following morning.


**Alternatively, continue to Pangboche (3950 m) where fewer people stay overnight (a further 4.2 km, approx 1.5 hours trekking time). Pangboche is a lovely village with fantastic views of Ama Dablam, and there are many guesthouses. Tengboche, on the other hand, only has two guesthouses and it can be difficult to get a room here in peak season. Continuing to Pangboche also means the trail will be less busy for both your Tengboche to Pangboche section, and the Pangboche to Dingboche section the following morning.


***On days 8 and 9 the classic itinerary that most people follow is to visit EBC after lunch at Gorak Shep, then hike up Kala Patthar in the dark for sunrise the next morning (when it is bitterly cold). If you swap these two around as per the above suggested itinerary, you are guaranteed to have a less busy experience at both EBC and on the trail up Kala Patthar. As the skies are usually clearer in the morning you are also likely to have better views at EBC, however it is possible that the views from Kala Patthar will be obscured by afternoon clouds. If you’re lucky and have clear afternoon skies, then you will be treated to a fiery sunset glow on Everest and the surrounding mountains. If you hike up Kala Patthar in the morning, your mountain views will be brief as the sun rises directly behind Everest and you’ll soon be looking directly into the sun.


IMPORTANCE OF BUFFER DAYS

Building in buffer days to your Everest Base Camp itinerary is highly recommended, especially if you plan on flying to/from Lukla. Flights are regularly cancelled due to poor weather conditions, sometimes for a number of days. If everything runs smoothly, it takes half a day or less to get to/from Lukla at the start/end of your trek. However, if flights are not operating, it can take up to 3 days to travel overland from Kathmandu to Lukla, using a mixture of buses and jeeps, and by trekking too. Therefore, it’s wise to have at least 3 or 4 days between the end of your planned trek itinerary and any international flight. This would allow you time to get from Lukla to Kathmandu overland if necessary.

Of course, a delay could also happen at the start of your trek while trying to get to Lukla, and this might leave you struggling to catch up with your original itinerary. Having a couple of buffer days built in will mean you don’t have to drastically alter your itinerary, avoiding the need to walk extra long distances to save a day or skipping places because you don’t have time.

Buffer days also allow you to alter your itinerary on the go more easily. For example, if you get sick and need to spend an extra night somewhere,  or the weather is bad and you want to wait it out before continuing your trek, then you have the extra days on hand.

It’s worth knowing that should everything go to plan and you don’t need to use any buffer days during your trek, it’s straightforward for a trekking agency to change the date of your flight, bringing it forward a few days for example. However, this is not so easy if you have booked your flight online, independently.

OUR RECOMMENDED TREKKING AGENCY

We partnered with Himalayan Masters for our Langtang Valley, Gosainkunda, EBC and Everest Three Passes treks, and found them to be professional and committed to a high level of service

To enquire about booking your own trek, get in touch via email at info@himalayan-masters.com and mention the code HOGG5 to get a 5% discount off the cost of your trip


EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK SUMMARY

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

ROUTE SUMMARY

LUKLA TO NAMCHE BAZAAR

The first two days of the Everest Base Camp trek are repeated in reverse on the final day of the trek. With only one route connecting Lukla and Namche Bazaar, unfortunately there’s no avoiding this. 

This section of the trek passes through numerous villages and teahouse settlements, the last of which is Jorsale, shortly beyond the entrance to Sagarmatha National Park. There are five suspension bridges to cross, including the 125 metre high Hillary Bridge, and numerous smaller fixed metal bridges. The Khumbu Trek Card Registration desk (where you get your Khumbu Trek Card and pay your Sagarmatha NP entrance fee) is shortly beyond Lukla, and there are further checkpoints at Toc Toc, Monjo, and just before Namche Bazaar.

The route follows a mixture of wide stone paths, riverside paths, and forest trail, with plenty of up and down along the way. There is one notable ascent, a 700 metre climb immediately after crossing the Hillary Suspension Bridge, on the last stretch before Namche. This section is a pleasant couple of days and a good introduction to the trek, with greenery and the chance to see colourful rhododendrons and blossoms in spring, plenty of scenic river views, and a definite buzz thanks to all the people coming and going and the numerous villages dotting the trail.

With only one route up and down to Namche, traffic jams are common along this section, with trekkers, porters, and pack mules, yaks and their handlers all sharing the same trail. Bottlenecks are particularly common at suspension bridges and on the steep climb up to Namche. Be sure to wait on the side of the trail without a drop-off when letting pack animals pass, and don’t start crossing a bridge if you can see them coming in the opposite direction – let them cross first. Finally, stick to the left side when walking by any mani stones, mani walls and prayer wheels, as it’s both common practice and culturally appropriate.

For more detail about this section of the route, see Days 1 and 2 of our Everest Three Passes Route Guide.

A view of the Hillary Suspension bridge from the riverside trail 125 metres below, on the Monjo to Namche Bazaar section of the Everest Three Passes trek

The Hillary Suspension Bridge as seen from the valley floor, with the old bridge still in place below



A view of the Hillary Suspension bridge from the riverside trail 125 metres below, on the Monjo to Namche Bazaar section of the Everest Three Passes trek

The Hillary Suspension Bridge as seen from the
valley floor, with the old bridge still in place below



NAMCHE BAZAAR ACCLIMATISATION DAY

It’s important to acclimatise properly throughout your Everest Base Camp trek. This allows your body time to get used to the ever-increasing altitude as you ascend to 5000 metres and above. Building in rest days, staying well hydrated, and going on acclimatisation hikes (where you climb higher during the day but sleep lower at night) are all good ways of helping your body acclimatise.

Unless you are already acclimatised (for example you have been at altitudes of 4000 metres and higher within the previous week), spending a second night at Namche Bazaar is highly recommended and this is standard on virtually all Everest Base Camp trek itineraries. You should do this even if it seems like you feel physically fine. 

The most common destination for an acclimatisation hike from Namche Bazaar is the Hotel Everest View (3880 m), where you can get lunch or a drink and enjoy fantastic views from the terrace. It takes around 3 hours to hike up to the hotel and back down again. A must-visit on the way is Sagarmatha Next, a learning / experience / visitor centre and gallery championing waste management solutions for the Khumbu region. 

A morning view of Namche Bazaar on the Everest Base Camp and Three Passes treks, the buildings bright in the morning sun and snow capped peaks rising behind

Morning view over Namche Bazaar from the northeast



A morning view of Namche Bazaar on the Everest Base Camp and Three Passes treks, the buildings bright in the morning sun and snow capped peaks rising behind

Morning view of Namche Bazaar from the northeast



For a longer hike and the chance to see more of the local area, doing a loop via Khumjung is a great option. Khumjung is the largest Sherpa village in the region, with an impressive monastery and a school founded by Edmund Hillary in 1960. The original classroom is now the Sir Edmund Hillary Visitor Centre, another great place to visit and learn about the Khumbu region. The loop hike (including Hotel Everest View) is around 7.5 km, and you should allow up to 5 hours for the hike. It’s also possible to include a visit to Khunde village, home to another monastery. This would extend the loop route to around 9.1 km and you should allow up to 6 hours.  

If you plan to overnight at Khumjung on day 4 of your trek, following the ‘Alternative Everest Base Camp Itinerary’ outlined above, you might want to opt for a shorter Namche acclimatisation hike. Hiking 100 metres up to the helipad on the western side of the village is a good choice. There is an excellent view over Namche from here, where you can see it curving around the sloping hillside in amphitheatre-like fashion.

Various Namche acclimatisation hiking routes are marked on our EBC Trek map.

NAMCHE BAZAAR TO DINGBOCHE

CLASSIC ROUTE VIA TENGBOCHE

This two-day section of the Everest Base Camp trek offers fantastic mountain scenery and a beautiful trekking trail, passing through forest and open hillside. There is one notable big climb between Phunki Thanga and Tengboche but otherwise the trail is mostly straightforward, with just a few short steep sections, and plenty of flat, undulating, or gentle climbs. There are a handful of small villages along the route, two suspension bridges, a checkpoint at Phunki Thanga, and an impressive monastery at Tengboche which is well worth visiting (daily 7am – 8am, 9am – 11am, and 1pm – 5:30pm, monks chanting at 3pm). After Pangboche you are more or less above the treeline, surrounded by imposing mountains and expansive views.

For more detail about this section of the route, see Days 4 and 5 of our Everest Three Passes Route Guide.

Trekkers pass by guesthouses in the village of Shomare on the Everest Base Camp Trek, with the twin peaks of Ama Dablam rising behind and marking the hazy morning skyline

Trekkers pass through Shomare on the way to Dingboche, with the twin peaks of Ama Dablam rising behind



Trekkers pass by guesthouses in the village of Shomare on the Everest Base Camp Trek, with the twin peaks of Ama Dablam rising behind and marking the hazy morning skyline

Trekkers pass through the village of Shomare on
the way to Dingboche, with the twin peaks of
Ama Dablam rising behind



ALTERNATIVE ROUTE VIA KHUMJUNG AND PHORTSE

This three-day route section follows an alternative trail between Namche and Pangboche before joining the classic Everest Base Camp trail for the final stretch to Dingboche. Opting for this itinerary allows you to vary your route on the way to and from EBC and take advantage of much quieter trails. Plus, the extra day allows for a slower ascent pace, which is a good option for anyone who knows they are slow to acclimatise or prefers to follow a more cautious itinerary.

This route climbs initially to Khumjung, the largest Sherpa village in the region, then stays above the ‘Classic EBC’ route to Pangboche, offering fantastic views throughout. There is a small guesthouse settlement at Mong La (3970 m) which is the highest point on the way to Phortse, a scenic village with a number of guesthouses, local homes, and the Khumbu Climbing Centre

There is plenty of up and down on this section of the trek, with some notable climbs to Khumjung, Mong La, and both before and after Phortse. However, this route is not considerably more challenging than the ‘Classic EBC’ route, especially as it is split over three days instead of two. 

DINGBOCHE ACCLIMATISATION DAY

Spending two nights at Dingboche, a sizeable village situated at 4300 m, is advisable in order to ensure you ascend to very high altitude at a safe rate. Going on an acclimatisation hike is also an important part of acclimatising to such altitudes, and Nangkartshang Peak (5039 m) is a great option. This hill rises to the north of Dingboche and there are fantastic views throughout the climb, especially of Ama Dablam. There is an obvious path all the way to the rocky top, which is festooned with prayer flags and spacious enough for plenty of people. The 766 metre climb should take around 2.5 – 3 hours, with the descent about half that. It’s advisable to start early (around 7:30am) for the best chance of clear views and calm conditions. 

People rest and take in the views from the prayer flags (5039 m) on Nangkartshang, a day hike from Dingboche that is important for acclimatisation on the Everest Three Passes and Everest Base Camp treks

After a 760 metre climb, people rest and enjoy the views at the prayer flags on Nangkartshang



People rest and take in the views from the prayer flags (5039 m) on Nangkartshang, a day hike from Dingboche that is important for acclimatisation on the Everest Three Passes and Everest Base Camp treks

After a 760 metre climb, people rest and enjoy
the views at the prayer flags on Nangkartshang



For a longer and less busy acclimatisation hike, a great option is the side hike up the valley to the east of Dingboche to Chukhung Village and Chukhung Ri, a viewpoint situated at 5380 m. The views from Chukhung Ri are fantastic, looking back down the valley and across to an impressive ice wall, and you’ll be surrounded by numerous majestic snowy peaks including Lhotse, Nuptse, Island Peak and Ama Dablam. Allow up to 8 hours for this return hike.

A trekker and guide stop to appreciate the views after the initial climb up from Chukhung on this Everest Three Passes acclimatisation hike

Plenty of outstanding views to appreciate while hiking up to Chukhung Ri



A trekker and guide stop to appreciate the views after the initial climb up from Chukhung on this Everest Three Passes acclimatisation hike

Plenty of outstanding views to stop and
appreciate while hiking up to Chukhung Ri



Whichever acclimatisation hike you decide to do, ensure you have plenty of water, snacks, and warm layers with you.

For more detail about these hikes, see Day 6 (Nangkartshang) and Day 8 (Chukhung Ri) of our Three Passes Route Guide.

DINGBOCHE TO EVEREST BASE CAMP

CLASSIC ROUTE

If you’re following the Classic EBC route you’ll trek from Dingboche to Base Camp over 2 – 2.5 days, spending a night at Lobuche and then at Gorak Shep. From Gorak Shep you’ll do a return hike to EBC. Most people also include a side hike to Kala Patthar, the highest point of the trek at 5611 m, where you can get a view of Mt Everest (which isn’t actually visible from Base Camp.) 

The route heads up the valley to the northwest of Dingboche, climbs to Thok La pass, then heads northeast, running parallel to the Khumbu Glacier all the way to Base Camp. It’s a gradual ascent for most of the way, but at these altitudes (4300 m – 5300 m) even a gentle climb can take your breath away. The climb to Thok La on the way to Lobuche, the short but steep climb on the way to Gorak Shep, and the undulating rocky glacier section immediately before Gorak Shep are among the most challenging sections.

The views are wonderful throughout and the final sight of Everest Base Camp, encircled by soaring peaks, is a memorable one. This is especially true if you’re trekking during the peak climbing season, when a sea of tents sprawls across the glacier at the foot of the Khumbu Icefall – seen from the trail, these tiny yellow dots emphasise the enormity of the surroundings even more.

Everest base Camp on a sunny April morning during the spring climbing season; a multitude of yellow tents sit atop the rock-covered glacier, with many peaks and the Khumbu Icefall rising behind, and the summit of Mount Everest just visible in the background

The clouds parting to reveal the massive bulk of Mount Everest about 30 minutes before sunset, seen from Kala Patthar on the Everest Three Passes and Base Camp trek

Two trekkers and a guide posing for the obligatory photo on the 'Everest Base Camp Rock' on a sunny blue skies morning

Everest base Camp on a sunny April morning during the spring climbing season; a multitude of yellow tents sit atop the rock-covered glacier, with many peaks and the Khumbu Icefall rising behind, and the summit of Mount Everest just visible in the background

First sight of Everest Base Camp from the trail


Two trekkers and a guide posing for the obligatory photo on the 'Everest Base Camp Rock' on a sunny blue skies morning

Posing for the obligatory photo on the ‘EBC Rock’


The clouds parting to reveal the massive bulk of Mount Everest about 30 minutes before sunset, seen from Kala Patthar on the Everest Three Passes and Base Camp trek

Seen from the Kala Patthar trail about 30 minutes
before sunset
, the clouds part to reveal the summit
of Mount Everest (8849 m)



Lobuche is a small settlement of guesthouses on the edge of the Khumbu Glacier, a very busy spot where everyone going to and from EBC stops for food and/or spends the night. Gorak Shep is even smaller, busier, and more basic with just four guesthouses and no good water supply. 

For more detail about this section of the route, see Days 10 and 11 of our Everest Three Passes Route Guide.

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE VIA KONGMA LA

This alternative route to Everest Base Camp is a three day trek between Dingboche and Lobuche, via Chukhung, Chukhung Ri and Kongma La. At Lobuche you rejoin the classic route for the final section to Gorak Shep, Kala Patthar and EBC. This is part of the Everest Three Passes trek and is a challenging but very rewarding addition to the EBC trek. With far fewer people trekking this route compared to the Classic EBC route, you can expect the trail to be much quieter.

The route follows a gently ascending trail up the scenic valley to the northeast of Dingboche before reaching the small guesthouse settlement of Chukhung. It’s advisable to spend two nights here, using the extra day for an acclimatisation hike to the spectacular viewpoint of Chukhung Ri (5380 m) before crossing Kongma La the following day. The scenery around the village is very dramatic, as are the views seen throughout the hike to Chukhung Ri, with Ama Dablam rising to the south, Island Peak to the east, and Lhotse and Nuptse to the north, along with countless other peaks and the dramatic ice wall of the Chukhung Glacier.

The trek to Kongma La (5514 m) involves a long ascent but other than a couple of short steep sections, it’s mostly a steady climb, and the landscape is striking. From the pass you have incredible 360 degree views and you can see all the way down to Lobuche, a small cluster of buildings on the far side of the rocky Khumbu Glacier. The descent is somewhat steep and slippery at first due to loose dirt, shale, and small rocks, but becomes less steep as you work your way down to the eastern side of the glacier. The final section, crossing the glacier itself, involves plenty of up and down as you work your way across jumbled rocks and around small glacial lakes; on the other side, a final downhill stretch leads to Lobuche.

For more detail about this section of the route, see Days 7 – 9 of our Everest Three Passes Route Guide.

A hiker and guide cross a flat, rocky section before Kongma La on the Everest Three Passes trek, with the snowy ridgeline to the east visible behind

On the final approach to Kongma La



A hiker and guide cross a flat, rocky section before Kongma La on the Everest Three Passes trek, with the snowy ridgeline to the east visible behind

On the final approach to Kongma La



EVEREST BASE CAMP TO LUKLA

CLASSIC ROUTE

The Classic Everest Base Camp trekking route follows the same trail on the return to Namche Bazaar, covering the distance in three days with overnights at Pheriche, Namche, and Lukla. As you drop in altitude more oxygen flows through your blood and the physical strain on your body reduces. This combined with the fact that you no longer need to think about acclimatisation enables you to cover a much greater daily distance than on previous days. The return section of the trek is not all downhill however, and three 17 – 19 km days in a row can be very tiring!

ALTERNATIVE ROUTE VIA CHO LA AND GOKYO LAKES

An alternative route connects Lobuche and Namche Bazaar via Cho La and Gokyo Lakes. This turns your trek into a loop hike commonly known as the Everest Base Camp and Gokyo Lakes trek. Following this route over six days, you’ll cross Cho La (5368 m), a high pass to the west of Lobuche, descend from the pass and traverse the rocky Ngozumpa Glacier to reach Gokyo and a string of brilliant blue lakes, then follow the Gokyo Valley back to Namche where you’ll join the trail to Lukla. The route takes in some of the best scenery in the Khumbu region and is a fantastic alternative to the Classic EBC trek, although definitely more challenging with the addition of the high pass. 

This route diverges from the classic trail a little south of Lobuche, working its way around a hillside to the northwest to reach the small guesthouse settlement of Dzonglha. The ascent to Cho La on the next morning is initially gradual, after which there are a couple of steep sections and the crossing of an icy glacier (microspikes recommended) just before the pass. The descent starts off steeply (aided by a fixed metal rope) before becoming more gradual as it works its way down the valley to the guesthouses at Dragnag (Thangnak). On the following morning* you have to cross the Ngozumpa Glacier, the largest glacier in Nepal, with a rocky, undulating trail passing small glacial lakes to reach Gokyo on the other side. The descent onto and climb off the glacier is quite steep.

*If you are looking to save a day it is possible to continue to Gokyo after crossing Cho La, without spending the night at Dragnag (Thangnak). It will very much depend on your energy levels and the weather conditions on the day.  

Trekkers cross the glacier towards Cho La, the middle of the three passes on the Everest Three Passes trek

Trekkers crossing the icy glacier towards Cho La (5368 m), the rocky dip ahead



Trekkers cross the glacier towards Cho La, the middle of the three passes on the Everest Three Passes trek

Trekkers crossing the icy glacier towards
Cho La (5368 m), the rocky dip ahead



Gokyo, a medium-sized teahouse village, sits on the western side of the glacier, on the shores of Dudh Pokhari, or Gokyo 3rd Lake. The setting is beautiful. You can visit the 4th Lake on a side hike to the north, and climb the steep trail to Gokyo Ri early the next morning for some of the most impressive views in the region. The return to Namche Bazaar is via the Gokyo valley, following the Dudh Koshi river. A good option is to break your journey at the small village of Dole, then continue beyond Namche to overnight at Monjo before the final stretch back to Lukla. 

An early morning view of beautiful blue Gokyo Lake and the guesthouses of the village, a place worth staying an extra night on the Everest Three Passes trek

Early morning at Gokyo



An early morning view of beautiful blue Gokyo Lake and the guesthouses of the village, a place worth staying an extra night on the Everest Three Passes trek

Early morning at Gokyo



Beyond Dole the trail descends towards Phortse Tenga, then climbs to Mong La, on the same route as outlined in the ‘Alternative Route via Khumjung and Phortse’ section. From Mong La it’s possible to descend all the way to Sanasa and take the same trail back to Namche that you followed on the way to Tengboche, or stay higher and follow a trail to the large Sherpa village of Khumjung before descending to Namche. The route between Namche and Lukla is the same as at the start of the trek. 

For more detail about the Everest Base Camp to Gokyo section of the route, see Days 11 – 15 of our Everest Three Passes Route Guide.

SEE MORE FROM NEPAL

Featured image for the Everest Base Camp trek guide, featuring a trekker walking on a rocky trail with mountain peaks in the distance
With Ama Dablam as a backdrop, a trekker and guide stop to enjoy the views while doing the Nangkartshang acclimatisation hike on the Everest Three Passes trek
A hiker and guide cross a flat, rocky section before Kongma La on the Everest Three Passes trek, with the snowy ridgeline to the east visible behind
A trekker and guide climbing the snow covered slope towards Laurebina Pass (4650 m), with the blue surface of Gosainkunda shining in the morning sun below
Snow covered guesthouses reflected in the bright blue waters of Gosainkunda
Trekkers enjoying mountain views and a well earned rest atop Kyanjin Ri (4586 m) in the Langtang Valley
Snowy mountain view with colourful prayer flags in the foreground, seen from the first Kyanjin Ri viewpoint (4300 m) on the Langtang Valley trek
Featured image for 'What to Pack for Trekking in Nepal', featuring trekkers, guides and porters crossing a suspension bridge on the Everest Base Camp route
A narrow trekking trail in Upper Mustang stretching off into the distance amidst some bizarre rock formations, with the snowy peak of Dhaulagiri in the background
Trekkers on a trail approaching a round orange rock formation with a plateau stretched out into the distance in Upper Mustang
Sunrise hitting the Annapurna Mountains in Nepal
Trekkers look out while descending from the Larke Pass on the Manaslu Circuit Trek
Featured image for the Everest Base Camp trek guide, featuring a trekker walking on a rocky trail with mountain peaks in the distance
With Ama Dablam as a backdrop, a trekker and guide stop to enjoy the views while doing the Nangkartshang acclimatisation hike on the Everest Three Passes trek
A hiker and guide cross a flat, rocky section before Kongma La on the Everest Three Passes trek, with the snowy ridgeline to the east visible behind
A trekker and guide climbing the snow covered slope towards Laurebina Pass (4650 m), with the blue surface of Gosainkunda shining in the morning sun below
Snow covered guesthouses reflected in the bright blue waters of Gosainkunda
Trekkers enjoying mountain views and a well earned rest atop Kyanjin Ri (4586 m) in the Langtang Valley
Snowy mountain view with colourful prayer flags in the foreground, seen from the first Kyanjin Ri viewpoint (4300 m) on the Langtang Valley trek
Featured image for 'What to Pack for Trekking in Nepal', featuring trekkers, guides and porters crossing a suspension bridge on the Everest Base Camp route
A narrow trekking trail in Upper Mustang stretching off into the distance amidst some bizarre rock formations, with the snowy peak of Dhaulagiri in the background
Trekkers on a trail approaching a round orange rock formation with a plateau stretched out into the distance in Upper Mustang
Sunrise hitting the Annapurna Mountains in Nepal
Trekkers look out while descending from the Larke Pass on the Manaslu Circuit Trek

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREKKING SEASON

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

TREKKING SEASON

Like many treks in Nepal, the peak seasons for trekking the Everest Base Camp route are April to mid-May and October to mid-November. These months typically offer the best chance of both clear skies and warmer temperatures, although weather patterns are becoming increasingly unpredictable in Nepal and across the world, so you should still be prepared for snow and colder temperatures during these periods.

The spring trekking season coincides with the Everest climbing season, so the Khumbu region is very busy with helicopters and yaks transporting supplies to Everest Base Camp. If trekking at this time, you will have the chance to see base camp fully set up with all the tents, and there is a great buzz about the place. Outside of the climbing season, there are no tents or any other infrastructure at EBC.

Trekkers cross the moraine-covered glacier accompanied by towering mountain views enroute to Gorak Shep on the Everest Three Passes and Everest Base Camp treks

Trekkers crossing the moraine-covered glacier between Lobuche and Gorak Shep on a clear skies spring morning



Trekkers cross the moraine-covered glacier accompanied by towering mountain views enroute to Gorak Shep on the Everest Three Passes and Everest Base Camp treks

Trekkers crossing the moraine-covered glacier
before Gorak Shep on a clear spring morning



In autumn, expect less wind and higher temperatures than in spring, while in late March and April, blooming rhododendrons and other spring flowers are a beautiful sight at some lower elevations.

The shoulder seasons are March, May, September and mid-November to December. During these times it can be much quieter on the trail. There is typically cold weather in March and December. In March there is a high chance of lingering or fresh snow. December typically has sunny weather and clear skies throughout the day. In late May and early September there is a higher chance of early or lingering monsoon rains and cloudy skies.

The summer months of June, July, and August coincide with the monsoon season. Trekking during this period means lots of walking in rain, muddy trails, leeches, and poor visibility with clouds obscuring the surrounding mountains. Many guesthouses close during this period, and it is not a good time to trek. Flights to and from Lukla are likely to be cancelled regularly and for days at a time.

The winter months of January and February are considered too cold by most to trek and many guesthouses are closed.

PLAN A TREK IN THE LANGTANG VALLEY

HOW TO GET TO LUKLA

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

HOW TO GET TO LUKLA

Lukla is the gateway for all treks in the Khumbu region, including Everest Base Camp, Everest Three Passes, and Gokyo Lakes. Nestled in the mountains at 2855 m, the closest dirt-road access is approximately 1 day’s walk away, with a tarmac road 3+ days’ walk away. The majority of people arrive in Lukla by air, landing at the small runway or helicopter pad at Tenzing-Hillary Airport (LUA). If you prefer not to fly, it’s possible to get to Lukla overland in 3+ days, by taking a bus/jeep then trekking on foot.

FLYING TO LUKLA

Flights to Lukla operate year-round from either Kathmandu or Ramechhap/Manthali (approx 4 hours’ drive from Kathmandu), although cancellations and delays are common as flights can only run in favourable weather conditions. The flight time is 30 minutes from Kathmandu, and 15 minutes from Ramechhap/Manthali. The Lukla runway is just 527 metres long and is sloped at an 11.7% gradient, making taking off and landing challenging for pilots and a little daunting for passengers.

Flights are operated by Tara (Yeti) Air, Summit Air, and Sita Air, with each company using small 15 seater twin propeller planes. Flights usually only operate in the morning, when the skies are clearer and there is less wind. There is a weight limit of 10 kg checked baggage + 5 kg hand baggage. The cabin is not pressurised and it’s very noisy. There are no assigned seats. For the best mountain views, try to sit on the left while flying to Lukla and the right on the return flight.

During peak trekking and climbing seasons, Lukla flights operate to and from Ramechhap/Manthali in order to ease congestion at Kathmandu Airport. The dates change annually, but this is roughly April 1st – May 20th and September 20th – November 20th. See below for how to get from Kathmandu to Ramechhap/Manthali.

The runway at the Tenzing-Hillary Airport in Lukla, sloped at an 11.7% gradient and just 527 metres long, used by the majority of trekkers flying to the Khumbu region for the Everest Base Camp, Everest Three Passes, and Gokyo Lakes treks

The runway at the Tenzing-Hillary Airport in Lukla, sloped at an 11.7% gradient and just 527 metres long



The runway at the Tenzing-Hillary Airport in Lukla, sloped at an 11.7% gradient and just 527 metres long, used by the majority of trekkers flying to the Khumbu region for the Everest Base Camp, Everest Three Passes, and Gokyo Lakes treks

The runway at Tenzing-Hillary Airport in Lukla,
on an 11.7% gradient and just 527 metres long



Flight tickets cost $180 one way from Kathmandu and $152 one way from Ramechhap/Manthali. You can book online directly with the airline, or via an agency in Kathmandu. If you are booking an inclusive trekking package, for example with our recommended local trekking agency Himalayan Masters, your flight will be organised for you. Booking the earliest possible flight time is best as clouds tend to move in and the wind picks up through the morning, with later flights more likely to be cancelled. Note that agencies sometimes have access to earlier flights than are available to book online.

It is free of charge to change your flight date (in advance by calling the airline or in person at the airport) and it’s a good idea to reconfirm the day before you fly to avoid being bumped onto a later flight. Again, if you have booked through a trekking agency, they can take care of any flight changes and reconfirmations for you. This makes the whole process much more straightforward than if you have booked independently (especially if you’re trying to make changes while trekking with limited phone service or internet connection).

Be aware that it can be a bit chaotic at the airport and being bumped onto a different flight time and/or standing around confused about what’s happening is pretty normal. The situation is certainly easier to manage if you are with a guide, who will be used to the process, speaks the local language, and will take care of everything for you.

FLYING TO PHAPLU/SALLERI

Sometimes when flights can’t depart for Lukla, there is an option to fly to Phaplu (2 km north of Salleri) instead. From Phaplu it’s possible to trek to Lukla in about 3 days, or you can take a jeep as far as Thamdada (subject to road conditions) and trek the remaining distance to Lukla in 1 day.

See stages 2 and 3 in the ‘how to get to Lukla without flying’ section below for more details.

HOW TO GET FROM KATHMANDU TO RAMECHHAP AIRPORT (MANTHALI)

You can get from Kathmandu to Ramechhap Airport (RHP) (also known as Manthali) by public bus, shuttle bus, or private car. The journey takes around 4 hours.

Public buses depart between approx 0600 – 1100 from Ratna Park (also known as Old Bus Park) near Thamel, costing approx 600 NPR  ($4.50 USD). The journey takes around 4 – 5 hours. You will need to spend one night at a guesthouse in Manthali before flying to Lukla the following morning. There are guesthouses within walking distance of Ramechhap Airport. You can just show up and buy a bus ticket on the day. Buses arrive at the Manthali Bus Park.

Shuttle buses depart from the Thamel area of Kathmandu at 0130 and 0200, allowing you to fly to Lukla the same morning. They also depart at 1100, if you prefer to travel during the day and spend one night in Manthali before flying to Lukla. The journey takes about 4 hours. You must make a reservation in advance. You can do this via a local agency, ask staff at your accommodation to help, or book online via Viator or Get Your Guide. Tickets cost up to $30 USD.


A private car costs approx 14000 NPR ($100 USD), which can be shared by up to 4 passengers. The road condition does not require a jeep/4×4 vehicle. The journey takes about 4 hours, with door-to-door service. You can book a private car via a local agency or ask staff at your accommodation to help organise it.

For the return journey from Ramechhap/Manthali to Kathmandu you must pre-arrange your shuttle transfer or private car transfer. If travelling back to Kathmandu by public bus, you should be able to get one from the Manthali Bus Park after arriving on the flight from Lukla.

HELICOPTER TO LUKLA

It is also possible to fly from Kathmandu to Lukla by helicopter. Helicopters can often fly in weather conditions that would ground twin propellor planes, they are generally considered safer, and they operate out of Kathmandu Airport year-round (unlike planes which only depart from Ramechhap/Manthali during peak season). Flying by helicopter is considerably more expensive though, costing around $500 USD one way per person (assuming there are enough people to fill five seats). You can book via a local travel or trekking agency, or book online in advance via Viator.

Snow capped mountains seen through the window of a helicopter enroute to Lukla with passengers starting the Everest Three Passes trek

Morning mountain views on the helicopter ride to Lukla



Snow capped mountains seen through the window of a helicopter enroute to Lukla with passengers starting the Everest Three Passes trek

Morning mountain views on the helicopter ride



HOW TO GET TO LUKLA WITHOUT FLYING

It’s possible to get to Lukla without flying by using a combination of bus and/or jeep and trekking. This takes 3 – 5 days. Eventually there will be a road built all the way to Lukla, but for now the closest you can possibly get by jeep on a dirt road is Thamdada (1 day walk to Lukla), and by bus or jeep on a sealed road is Salleri/Phaplu (3 – 4 days’ walk to Lukla). Buses and jeeps stop for food and toilet breaks along the way. As the road between Salleri/Phaplu and Thamdada is unsealed, its condition can vary greatly depending on how much rain there has been. Sometimes it’s not possible to drive all the way to Thamdada, and you may only be able to reach Bupsa, Kharikhola, or Adderi.

Although it may be possible to get all the way from Kathmandu to Thamdada in one day, we do not recommend this as it means travelling on a dirt road with challenging hairpin bends and steep sections in the dark. Instead, it’s advisable to spend one night in Salleri where there are lots of guesthouses and travel to Thamdada the following day. At Thamdada, there is a guesthouse (Kare Hotel) at the jeep stop and two more approximately 25 minutes’ walk from the jeep stop. Additionally, there are many more guesthouses at Paiyu, which is around 2 hours’ walk away. It’s also possible to stop shortly before Thamdada to stay at a guesthouse in Kare (approx 1 hours’ walk to Thamdada).

The trekking route from Salleri to Lukla goes via Ringmu, Nunthala, Kharikhola, Bupsa, Kari La (Thamdada), Paiyu and Surke. Common overnight stops are at Nunthala, Bupsa, and Surke, after which you join the classic Lukla (or Cheplung) to Namche Bazaar route. There is a lot of elevation gain and loss on the Salleri to Lukla trekking route, so expect plenty of tiring up and down. The driving route from Salleri to Thamdada goes via Adderi and joins the trekking route shortly before Kharikhola.

KATHMANDU TO LUKLA OVERLAND STAGES

STEP 1 // DRIVE KATHMANDU TO SALLERI/PHAPLU

9 – 12 hours travel time (mostly sealed road); Phaplu is about 2 km north of Salleri

Bus is approx 1700 NPR ($13 USD); departs from Chabahil Chowk (approx 0430) or from Koteshwor Chowk (approx 0500); no advance booking required

Shared Jeep is approx 2600 NPR ($20 USD) per person; departs from Chabahil Chowk and Koteshwor Chowk (approx 0500); best to reserve seat in advance (ask local travel agency or accommodation staff)

Private Jeep is approx $280 (can be shared between up to 7 people); door-to-door service, depart any time in morning; book via a local travel/trekking agency

STEP 2 // DRIVE SALLERI/PHAPLU TO THAMDADA (or Bupsa, Kharikhola, Adderi or elsewhere depending on road condition)

6 – 7 hours travel time (unsealed road)

Shared Jeep is approx 2600 NPR ($20 USD) per person; departs approx 0600; best to reserve seat in advance; (ask your accommodation owner to
book when you arrive in Salleri)

Private Jeep is approx $235 (can be shared between up to 7 people); door-to-door service, depart any time in the morning; book in advance in Kathmandu via a local travel/trekking agency

STEP 3 // TREK THAMDADA TO LUKLA OR CHEPLUNG

You can bypass Lukla itself and join the trail to Namche at Cheplung instead (you can get your Khumbu Trek Card from the checkpoint at Toc Toc as you will not pass the checkpoint at Lukla). There is a lot of up and down on this section. It is possible to cover the distance over two days if you prefer, staying at a guesthouse along the way (for example at Chheubas or Surke). The route and villages/guesthouses along the way are marked on our map.

To Lukla: 13.3 km | approx 7 hours trekking time | +1870 m / – 1744 m

To Cheplung: 13.9 km | approx 7 hours trekking time | +1785 m / – 1825 m


EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK PERMIT AND FEES

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

PERMIT AND FEES

You need two permits for the Everest Base Camp trek. Both are issued locally in the Khumbu region so you don’t need to organise permits in advance in Kathmandu. You will need your passport and the fee in cash in Nepalese rupees.

Keep your permits in a safe place as you will need to show them at various checkpoints during the trek.

SAGARMATHA NATIONAL PARK FEE

3000 NPR

(1500 NPR SAARC nationals/
100 NPR Nepali nationals)

Pay at checkpoint in Lukla
or NP entrance beyond Monjo


TREKKING EVEREST BASE CAMP INDEPENDENTLY

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

TREKKING INDEPENDENTLY

The Nepal Tourism Board announced on March 9th 2023 that as of April 1st 2023, all international trekkers in Nepal are required to hire a licenced trekking guide and obtain the TIMS card through an authorised trekking agency registered with the government of Nepal.

However, the Khumbu Pasanglhamu Rural Municipality has confirmed that it is NOT mandatory to trek with a guide in the Khumbu region. This means that you do not need to have a guide for the Everest Base Camp trek, or indeed for any other trek in the region such as the Gokyo Lakes or Three Passes treks. We have included copies of the official press release from April 2nd 2023 and an info card from September 2023 stating that a guide is not mandatory in the Khumbu region. You can check the Khumbu Pasanglhamu Rural Municipality Facebook page for any further updates.

Khumbu Press Release April 2023 with information for those planning to trek in the Everest region

An informational graphic about the Khumbu Trek Card and National Park Fees for those trekking in the Everest Region

PROS AND CONS OF INDEPENDENT TREKKING IN NEPAL

While having a guide in the Khumbu region is not mandatory, this does not mean that trekking to EBC independently is the right decision for you, especially if you are an inexperienced high altitude trekker. If you are thinking about doing the Everest Base camp trek without a guide, here are a few thoughts on the pros and cons of independent trekking in Nepal. 

PROS

This is the cheapest way to trek to Everest Base Camp. You won’t have to pay for anything extra beyond your daily food and accommodation costs, permit fee, and transport to/from the trailhead.

You have complete freedom and flexibility. You can choose how long to trek for each day, what route to take and where to stay. If you like somewhere, you can choose to stay an extra day without having to consult anyone else or consider their needs.

It is easier to enjoy a bit of ‘alone time’ on the trail. If you are trekking with a guide or group it can be harder or more awkward to branch out and enjoy walking alone with your thoughts.

You’ll likely have more interaction with locals. If you are trekking with a guide it is common practice for them to deal with everything at your guesthouse and act as a go-between. It’s normal for your guide to take your order, bring out your food, and settle up the bill on your behalf, which means you may have little interaction with the owner or staff yourself. But, you’ll be doing all that by yourself if you trek independently.

CONS

With freedom and flexibility comes more responsibility and the need to do more research, preparation and daily planning. You will need to spend time organising things both on and off the trail. You will need to sort out all the logistics like your permit, transport, and accommodation by yourself, and be confident in your route planning and navigation. 

You are more vulnerable in an emergency situation or if you get sick. This is especially true if you are trekking solo. You should prepare as best you can with a comprehensive medical kit, emergency contact numbers at the ready, and ideally an emergency communication device like the Garmin inReach.

In peak trekking season you may find it harder to get a room. Many guesthouses prefer bigger groups with organised companies and will give preference to them over independent solo trekkers or those in small groups. Guides with existing local contacts often call ahead to book rooms, something which isn’t as easy for independent trekkers with no personal contacts. Tengboche, Lobuche, and Gorak Shep all have limited accommodation options and it’s not uncommon for guesthouses here to be full during the peak seasons. 

You miss out on all the insights a knowledgeable, English speaking guide can offer. Your understanding of the region, and Nepal in general, is likely to be much broader after spending two weeks in the company of a Nepali guide rather than going it alone.


PROS

This is the cheapest way to trek the Everest Base Camp. You won’t have to pay for anything extra beyond your daily food and accommodation costs, permit fee, and transport to/from the trailhead. 

You have complete freedom and flexibility. You can choose how long to trek for each day, what route to take and where to stay. If you like somewhere, you can choose to stay an extra day without having to consult anyone else or consider their needs. 

It is easier to enjoy a bit of ‘alone time’ on the trail. If you are trekking with a guide or group it can be harder or more awkward to branch out and enjoy walking alone with your thoughts. 

You’ll likely have more interaction with locals. If you are trekking with a guide it is common practice for them to deal with everything at your guesthouse and act as a go-between. It’s normal for your guide to take your order, bring out your food, and settle up the bill on your behalf, which means you may have little interaction with the owner or staff yourself. But, you’ll be doing all that by yourself if you trek independently.

CONS

With freedom and flexibility comes more responsibility and the need to do more research, preparation and daily planning. You will need to spend time organising things both on and off the trail. You will need to sort out all the logistics like your permit, transport, and accommodation by yourself, and be confident in your route planning and navigation. 

You are more vulnerable in an emergency situation or if you get sick. This is especially true if you are trekking solo. You should prepare as best you can with a comprehensive medical kit, emergency contact numbers at the ready, and ideally an emergency communication device like the Garmin inReach.

In peak trekking season you may find it harder to get a room. Many guesthouses prefer bigger groups with organised companies and will give preference to them over independent solo trekkers or those in small groups. Guides with existing local contacts often call ahead to book rooms, something which isn’t as easy for independent trekkers with no personal contacts. Tengboche, Lobuche, and Gorak Shep all have limited accommodation options and it’s not uncommon for guesthouses here to be full during the peak seasons.

You miss out on all the insights a knowledgeable, English speaking guide can offer. Your understanding of the region, and Nepal in general, is likely to be much broader after spending two weeks in the company of a Nepali guide rather than going it alone.


TREKKING EVEREST BASE CAMP WITH A GUIDE (AND PORTER)

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

TREKKING WITH A GUIDE (AND PORTER)

Although not mandatory, many people choose to do the Everest Base Camp trek with a guide, and often with a porter too. If you are an inexperienced high altitude trekker we would absolutely recommend hiring a guide for this trek, but even if you are experienced, trekking with a guide is a great option. Not only can a guide be invaluable when it comes to your safety, a guide can also enrich your experience on the trail, giving you the opportunity to learn more about the history, culture, and geography of the land. Hiring a porter to carry your bag will put less strain on your body, making your trek much easier and perhaps allowing you to better enjoy the surroundings. Hiring a guide and/or porter also provides jobs and supports the trekking tourism economy.

One guide can accompany a maximum of five trekkers. A porter shouldn’t be asked to carry more than 25 kg, ideally no more than 20 kg. If you pack appropriately, one porter can carry two trekkers’ bags. Ensure that your guide and porter have appropriate clothing and equipment for the trail, including warm clothing for high altitudes (a down jacket, hat, gloves), boots, sunglasses, and waterproofs.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN TREKKING WITH A GUIDE

If you are doing the Everest Base Camp trek with a guide you may meet them in either Kathmandu or Lukla. If you meet in Kathmandu, you will travel to the trailhead together and return to Kathmandu together at the end. Professional guides in Nepal are both licenced and insured, and will speak English (sometimes other languages too).

During your trek a guide will walk with you on the trail, suggest the best spots to stop for lunch, and take you to their recommended overnight accommodation. At busy times, they may call ahead and pre-book a room for you. They will act as your go-between at each guesthouse, arranging your room, taking your food orders, and settling the bill. It’s normal for a guide to run through the following day’s itinerary each evening, giving you an overview of the trail, trekking time, and any other relevant information.

A trekker and guide chatting and smiling as they walk along sunny forest trail on the Everest Base Camp Trek

A guide can help with many practical things, provide insight into local culture, and be a good companion on the trail



A trekker and guide chatting and smiling as they walk along sunny forest trail on the Everest Base Camp Trek

A guide can help with many practical things,
provide insight into local culture, and be a
good companion on the trail



Your guide will always be around at your guesthouse, but they won’t stick by you constantly. You will have plenty of freedom to hang out in your room or the dining room, read your book, chat with other guests, play cards, etc. Guides sleep and eat in the same guesthouse as you, always in a separate room. A guide’s meals and accommodation are usually provided free of charge by guesthouses in exchange for their trekking clients’ custom. If a guesthouse is busy, your guide may share a room with other guides or be obliged to sleep in the dining room.

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN TREKKING WITH A PORTER

If you’re doing the Everest Base Camp trek with a porter, you will usually meet them locally at the start of your trek. It is not common for porters to travel with you from Kathmandu due to the expense of getting to/from the Khumbu region. Trekking agencies usually have a pool of porters that they work with regularly and can arrange a porter as part of any trekking package. As porters usually do not speak English, your guide will communicate and organise the day-to-day logistics with your porter during the trek.

Porters often go at their own pace so you won’t always trek with them. It’s common to pack your bag and have it ready for them before breakfast, and for your bag to already be in your room when you arrive at your guesthouse for the evening.

A porter carrying a heavy bag aided by a supporting head strap crosses a suspension bridge on the Everest Base Camp Trek

A porter putting in the hard work on the Everest Base Camp Trek



A porter carrying a heavy bag aided by a supporting head strap crosses a suspension bridge on the Everest Base Camp Trek

A porter putting in the hard work
on the Everest Base Camp Trek



CONDITIONS FOR PORTERS IN THE KHUMBU REGION

Conditions for trekking porters across Nepal are far from ideal, however they are particularly poor in the Khumbu region. Unlike in other trekking regions, guesthouse owners in the Khumbu do not permit porters to sleep or eat in their guesthouses alongside trekkers and guides (with the exception of a rare few based on our own experience). Instead, porters sleep and eat at designated Nepali hotels or porter shelters in each village or teahouse settlement in the Khumbu region. Also, unlike in other regions, porters in the Khumbu must pay for their meals, with a large proportion of their daily wage being spent on food.

The conditions in which porters sleep, often in one dormitory-style room with up to 100 or more porters, are much more basic than those experienced by trekkers and guides in guesthouses. Sometimes porter accommodation is full, and porters must walk to a different village to find available accommodation, returning to meet their trekking clients in the morning. This is especially common at Lobuche and Gorak Shep, where limited accommodation means that porters often have to walk for hours, back to Thukla or Pheriche to spend the night before returning early the next morning.

You can read more in the informative paper Uphill Struggle: Impediments and Facilitators to Porter Health in the Khumbu Region by Nate Barott (2018).

Porters stop for a break in the courtyard of a lunch establishment at Lawi Schyasa, between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche on the Everest Base Camp Trek

Porters stop for a break at Lawi Schyasa, between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche on the Everest Base Camp trail



Porters stop for a break in the courtyard of a lunch establishment at Lawi Schyasa, between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche on the Everest Base Camp Trek

Porters stop for a break at Lawi Schyasa,
between Namche Bazaar and Tengboche
on the Everest Base Camp trail



HOW TO ORGANISE AN EVEREST BASE CAMP TREKKING GUIDE (AND PORTER)

The easiest way to arrange a trekking guide is via a trekking agency. You can book an inclusive Everest Base Camp trekking package which covers your transport, entrance fees, guide (and porter), accommodation costs, and three meals a day. Alternatively, you can pay for a guide (and porter) only, and then pay-as-you-go for your accommodation, food, transport, and entrance fees (although this involves more day-to-day hassle than opting for an inclusive package).

Choosing a trekking agency is often the trickiest part as there are thousands of registered agencies in Nepal and the quality of service can vary greatly between them. Many trekkers will choose a guide or agency based on a trusted recommendation from a friend or fellow trekker, and this is a good approach. An alternative option is to visit a number of trekking agencies in person when you arrive in Thamel (Kathmandu) to get a feel for a company that you like, or to contact agencies online in advance.

OUR RECOMMENDED TREKKING AGENCY

Having trekked with three different agencies and three different guides on three visits to Nepal, our best experience has been with Himalayan Masters. We partnered with them for our Langtang, Gosainkunda Helambu, and Everest Base Camp and Three Passes treks, and found them to be very professional, committed to a high level of service, and competitively priced.

We really appreciate the fact that Sandip, the agency owner, is super flexible when it comes to itinerary amendments that don’t just follow the norm. He’s also a problem solver and what we’d call a real ‘go-getter’, a trait that’s highly valuable to his clients, whether he’s retrieving a swallowed bank card from a Thamel ATM in record time, or fixing logistical issues when things go wrong last minute at 2am (both real life examples experienced by us or fellow Himalayan Masters clients we met on the trail!).

We’d also highly recommend our Himalayan Masters guide, Govinda Rai, who we spent over a month trekking with in Nepal. He is very professional, taking care of everything you would expect from a guide, but also tailoring his suggestions and advice specifically to his clients, resulting in a more enjoyable trekking experience overall. We quickly came to trust his choices for lunch stops and accommodation as we felt they were always among the best options available. His knowledge of the trail was excellent, and his advice on trekking times for each day (based on our own pace) was spot-on, making it easier for us to plan our itinerary and make on-the-go changes as we saw fit. And on a personal level, we found Govinda to be easy-going, friendly, and an all-round great person to spend time with.

Govinda Rai, a trekking guide for Himalayan Masters, laughing and smiling in front of colourful prayer flags at the top of Kyanjin Ri (4856 m) on the Langtang Valley trek

Govinda, our Himalayan Masters guide



Govinda Rai, a trekking guide for Himalayan Masters, laughing and smiling in front of colourful prayer flags at the top of Kyanjin Ri (4856 m) on the Langtang Valley trek

Govinda, our Himalayan Masters guide



We also met a number of other Himalayan Masters guides while out on the trail, including Dipak who we chatted with lots, as our Langtang Valley trek itinerary coincided for three nights at the same guesthouses. From our interactions with Dipak, and positive feedback shared over dining room chats with his two trekking clients, we’re confident that Himalayan Masters are working with great guides across the board.

In addition to our guide, Govinda, we’d also highly recommend our porter, Prakas Tamang, organised last minute for us by Himalayan Masters. He knows the trail inside out, portering on the Everest Base Camp route, along with various others in the Khumbu region, multiple times a season. We felt he went above and beyond his role as a trekking porter, especially when breaking trail for us in snowy conditions while crossing Ngozumpa Glacier and Renjo La.

To discuss planning your Everest Base Camp trek you can get in touch with Himalayan Masters at info@himalayan-masters.com and you’ll get a 5% discount off your trip cost by using our code HOGG5.

HOW ABOUT TACKLING THE MANASLU CIRCUIT?

ACCOMMODATION ON THE EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

EVEREST BASE CAMP TREK

ACCOMMODATION

Accommodation on the Everest Base Camp trek is in the form of guesthouses, also known as teahouses or lodges. These can be found regularly along the trail in local villages (such as Namche Bazaar and Dingboche) or in guesthouse-only settlements (such as Lobuche and Gorak Shep). In general, the standard of accommodation is decent on the EBC trek, but it becomes more basic at higher altitude, with accommodation at Gorak Shep (5160 m) the most basic (and the toilets the most unpleasant) of the whole trek.

Snow capped Pumori occupies the background while blue roofed guesthouses occupy the foreground in the dry rocky landscape at Gorak Shep, the highest settlement trekkers stay at on the Everest Base Camp Trek

The accommodation at Gorak Shep (5160 m) is the most basic on the Everest Base Camp Trek, but the mountain views are spectacular



Snow capped Pumori occupies the background while blue roofed guesthouses occupy the foreground in the dry rocky landscape at Gorak Shep, the highest settlement trekkers stay at on the Everest Base Camp Trek

The accommodation at Gorak Shep (5160 m) is the
most basic on the Everest Base Camp Trek, but the
mountain views are spectacular



Guesthouses provide both accommodation and meals, and you are expected to eat dinner and breakfast at the guesthouse you sleep at. Lunch is usually at a different guesthouse along the trail, unless you arrive early at your destination for the day.

ROOMS

Rooms are basic, but comfortable. They usually have two single beds, although some places will have rooms sleeping three, or just one. Beds always have a sheet-covered mattress, a pillow with a pillowcase, and a blanket. We have seen plenty of bedding hanging out to dry which would suggest sheets, pillowcases, and blankets do get washed, however there is no guarantee that they will be freshly laundered for each guest. Personally, we always trek with our own sleeping bag and silk liner, using the blanket over our sleeping bag for extra warmth at higher altitudes.

There is always a light in the room, powered by mains electricity or solar. Often there is a small table, some hooks on the wall, and a bin, and there is almost always a window with curtains. Some guesthouses will have charging sockets in the room, but this is not always the case. There is no heating in guesthouse rooms, only ever in the main dining room.

DINING ROOM

Every guesthouse has a dining room where you can eat your meals, drink tea, and hang out. There are usually tables and benches around the perimeter of the room, with plenty of plastic chairs for huddling around the central stove. Expect to see a display cabinet of snacks and sundries for sale (eg. chocolate bars, biscuits, Pringles, toilet paper, soft drinks), and often a Buddhist prayer altar, too. The dining room is the only room with a stove. This is usually lit in the late afternoon or early evening as the sun goes down and it starts to get cold, making it nice and cosy.

People being served breakfast in a guesthouse dining room in Dragnag (Thangnak), a village on the Everest Three Passes and Everest Base Camp + Gokyo Lakes trekking routes

The dining room of Mountain Paradise Lodge in Dragnag/Thangnak on the Everest Base Camp and Gokyo Lakes Trek



People being served breakfast in a guesthouse dining room in Dragnag (Thangnak), a village on the Everest Three Passes and Everest Base Camp + Gokyo Lakes trekking routes

The dining room of Mountain Paradise Lodge in
Dragnag/Thangnak, a small teahouse settlement
on the Everest Base Camp and Gokyo Lakes Trek



TOILETS AND SHOWERS

There are usually rooms with attached bathrooms (ensuite) available as far as Dingboche. After Dingboche, rooms with shared (common) bathrooms are generally all that is available. If you have an attached bathroom this will usually have a toilet, sink (not always), and shower. Shared bathroom facilities normally consist of separate toilets and shower rooms, with a sink outside, although sometimes there is no dedicated sink and you’ll need to wash your hands/brush your teeth at an outdoor tap.

Toilets may be sit-down or squat style. Toilet paper is never provided, so you’ll need to pack your own and buy more as you go. Do not flush toilet paper down the toilet, always put it in the bin next to the toilet (this may be an old tin can, a cardboard box, a plastic container, or such like.) Sit-down toilets will likely have an automatic flush, although at higher altitudes in cold weather, the pipes can freeze and you may need to flush the toilet using a bucket of water. Squat toilets never have an automatic flush; you always need to flush using the scoop and bucket of water provided.

A gas shower is usually available although sometimes the water is solar heated. If neither are available, guesthouses can provide a bucket of hot water which you can use to wash. You can expect to pay up to 800 NPR for any kind of hot water shower at guesthouses between Namche Bazaar and Lobuche. There are no shower facilities at Gorak Shep.

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