• THE ISLE OF MULL

    TRAVEL GUIDE

    A nervous looking highland cow stares back from the muddy ground.
  • THE ISLE OF MULL

    An abandoned old boat stranded on the shore of Loch Scridain on the Isle of Mull.

9 THINGS TO DO ON THE ISLE OF MULL

From an early age, I’d always associated The Isle of Mull with a boring place for old people. This opinion was based solely on the fact that my grandparents used to holiday there every summer, in their tiny caravan parked by a farmer’s house near Salen. Their holiday snaps did nothing to convince me of Mull’s beauty. I mean, how nice could it be if they couldn’t even be bothered getting out the car to take the photo?

Fast forward a couple of decades and I was finally ready to put wildly unfounded childhood assumptions aside and explore Mull for myself. Needless to say, turns out it was my granny’s photography skills that were severely lacking, and no fault of the island.

THE ISLAND WITH ’A BIT OF EVERYTHING’

The Isle of Mull is the second largest of the Inner Hebrides (after Skye), and possibly the best Scottish Isle to visit for those looking to experience ‘a bit of everything’. It has beautiful white sand beaches, bizarre rock formations, and legend-filled caves fringing the coastline. Moving inland, mountains, waterfalls, and lochs create a scenic backdrop and a haven for hikers. Wildlife thrives on and around Mull, and in summer a boat trip to the Treshnish Isles and Fingal’s Cave is a must. History lovers can explore Iona Abbey and numerous castles. Foodies will relish the exceptionally fresh seafood, local farm produce, and chance to dine at award winning restaurants. And to top it all off is the wonderfully colourful and quirky hub of Tobermory.

Sheep on the beach at low tide at Fidden Farm on the Isle of Mull

Coastal scenes at Fidden Farm on the south coast of the island



A long haired highland cow with its eyes hidden in Glen Forsa on the Isle of Mull.

You’ll no doubt run into a highland cow or two



At just 45 minutes by ferry from Oban, Mull is easily accessible from the mainland. It also has a wide range of accommodation options to suit all tastes and budgets, everything from wild camping to homely B&Bs.

If I’ve succeeded in piquing your interest, more than a photo album full of car windscreens did for me, then read on for our top 9 things to do on the Isle of Mull.

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ISLE OF MULL MAP

Use the map below to help lead you around the island to the places mentioned in this guide. You can also download our Maps.me bookmarks here, which can be used offline together with the app.

EXPLORE COLOURFUL TOBERMORY

Tobermory is the island’s capital, a bustling little harbour lined with rainbow coloured houses and shopfronts. It’s the perfect place for a stroll, stopping off at cafes and specialist local stores along the way. The pier is lined with fishing ropes and creels, a very scenic viewpoint overlooking the bay. In nice weather, grab an ice cream and hang out on a harbour bench. In not-so-nice weather, dive into a local pub like The Mishnish or MacDonald Arms, or join a Tobermory distillery tour. Arts hub An Tobar is well worth the short walk up the brae behind the harbour. This cafe/exhibition space/shop/recording studio is housed in a beautiful old Victorian school. It hosts revolving exhibitions so there’s always something to see.

Colourful houses line the waterfront of Tobermory, the main town on the Isle of Mull in Scotland

The colourful and picturesque Tobermory waterfront, attractive come rain or shine



Colourful houses line the waterfront of Tobermory, the main town on the Isle of Mull in Scotland

The colourful and picturesque Tobermory
waterfront, attractive come rain or shine



If you’re looking to stretch your legs, the walk to the Rubha nan Gall lighthouse is ideal. You’ll have wonderful coastal views over to Ardnamurchan on the mainland. It’s about 5.5km, taking around 2 hours. Check out this walk description.

There are plenty of accommodation options in and around Tobermory, making it a popular base from which to explore the island. Tobermory Youth Hostel (open Apr – Sep) is perfectly located on the shorefront, as is the bright pink The Tobermory Hotel. There are also a number of B&Bs nearby, check out options here.

SAIL AWAY ON A WILDLIFE AND STAFFA TOUR

The Treshnish Isles lie off the west coast of Mull and are a haven for seabirds, including everybody’s favourite – puffins. Boat trips from Mull run between late April and early August to coincide with the breeding season. Besides puffins, you’ll also see colonies of razorbills, kittiwakes, fulmars, shags, guillemots, skuas, and more. You’ll likely see common and grey seals too, and possibly even some dolphins and minke whales.

Wind whipped water ripples off the west coast of Mull under dark and threatening skies.

The wild waters off the west coast of Mull are home to an abundance of birds and sea animals



Wind whipped water ripples off the west coast of Mull under dark and threatening skies.

The wild waters off the west coast of Mull are
home to an abundance of birds and sea animals



The other highlight of a boat trip from Mull is a visit to Staffa Island. This geological wonder is the result of an ancient volcanic eruption, the lava flows cooling in a particular way which creates a mass of hexagonally jointed basalt columns. Fingal’s Cave is the big draw here, a spectacular sea cave with natural acoustics that inspired Mendelssohn’s The Hebrides overture. In calm weather it’s possible to land on the island and walk inside the cave, with most boat tours allowing you up to one hour to explore. Boat tours to Staffa generally run from Easter until October.

A number of local companies run boat tours that include a visit to Lunga (the largest of The Treshnish Isles) and Staffa during the breeding season (approx £70). You can also do a boat tour just to Staffa if you’re visiting outwith the breeding season, or aren’t interested in the wildlife aspect of the tours (approx £35). Check out Turus Mara and Staffa Tours.

TUCK INTO LOCAL PRODUCE

Cheese. Seafood. Whisky. The Isle of Mull does it all well. The island is home to a number of fine restaurants, cafes, and small businesses offering fresh local produce which foodies will love. Seafood is as fresh as it comes here, and there’s no better place to tuck in than at the award winning Cafe Fish in Tobermory. Other restaurants worth seeking out (and making advance reservations for!) are Am Birlinn near Dervaig, and Ninth Wave near Fionnphort. Ballygown Restaurant is a small family run spot with daily changing menus and just four tables inside a traditional cottage. Nearby, The Boathouse welcomes you to the community owned island of Ulva and serves up own-grown oysters and shellfish from the family fishing boat.

Creels stacked on a jetty in Tobermory, with town's colourful houses seen behind.

Stacked creels at the harbour in Tobermory are testament to the kind of seafood you can expect in local restaurants



Creels stacked on a jetty in Tobermory, with town's colourful houses seen behind.

Stacked creels at the harbour in Tobermory
are testament to the kind of seafood you can
expect in local restaurants



For a more casual affair, don’t miss The Glass Barn, a quirky vine-filled cafe set on a working farm and home of Isle of Mull Cheese. Outside of tourist season the cafe is closed, but you can still pop in and pick up various homemade cheeses, chutney, and island-made produce from the honesty shop. Whisky aficionados will no doubt enjoy washing it all down with a fine Tobermory malt, and learning about the process on a distillery tour.

The entrance to Tobermory distillery on the Isle of Mull

The whisky distillery in Tobermory



Inside the brighlty lit, plant filled Glass Barn cafe on the Isle of Mull.

Popping in to The Glass Barn



Inside the brighlty lit, plant filled Glass Barn cafe on the Isle of Mull.

Popping in to The Glass Barn


The entrance to Tobermory distillery on the Isle of Mull

The whisky distillery in Tobermory



For those on a budget or self catering, the local stores dotted around the island have a great range of local Mull produce, including cheese, meats and seafood. Check out this Mull and Iona Food Trail map for more info.

Note that outside of tourist season (roughly Easter – October), most of the above restaurants and cafes are closed. Additionally, Ninth Wave has a no kids policy.

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BEACH HOP

Mull has some seriously nice beaches, aquamarine water lapping at white sandy shores. Well, as long as the sun is shining that is. But even on an overcast windswept day they can be pretty atmospheric. The majority of the best beaches on Mull are found along the south-west and south coast, as well as on Iona. Some are easily accessible by car (and therefore the busiest in summer), while others are hidden away and require a bit of effort to walk to.

NORTH MULL BEACHES

Calgary Bay is the best known beach on the island, a wide sweeping crescent backed by machair dunes. It’s not too far from Tobermory, easily accessible by car, and it has toilets and a cafe nearby too, making it an all-round favourite. If remote beaches are more your thing, a good option nearby is Langamull Beach, but you’ll need to walk 2 miles from the car park (56.5868, -6.2436) to get there (here’s the route description). You can also carry on around 1.5km further east to cosy wee Port na Ba (Market Bay) beach (also accessible on foot from Croig).

A person walks on the wide beach on an overcast afternoon at Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

Enjoying the views and taking an afternoon stroll on the wide beach at Calgary Bay



A person walks on the wide beach on an overcast afternoon at Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

Enjoying the views and taking an afternoon
stroll on the wide beach at Calgary Bay


Sunset colours reflected on the beach at Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull.

Sunset at Calgary Bay



SOUTH MULL BEACHES (CAR ACCESSIBLE)

Heading to the south of Mull, you’re spoilt for choice when it comes to great beaches big and small. The easiest to access by car are Fidden Beach and Uisken Beach. Both are also great for camping, with a paid campsite at Fidden Farm and informal camping at Uisken.

SOUTH-WEST BEACHES

A little further south from Fidden is lovely Knockvologan Beach, and at low tide you can cross the sand bar to Erraid, a tidal island. There’s a beautiful beach surrounded by pink granite on the south coast, known as Balfour’s Bay after the character in Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped (which is partly set here). It’s best to cross around 1 hour after high tide, and make sure you don’t get stuck! If you’re up for a hike, one of the most remote beaches on Mull is Traigh Gheal (‘white beach’ in Gaelic). It’s a 10km/4 hour round trip on boggy, overgrown trail, but you’ll likely have the beautiful beach all to yourself! To walk to Knockvologan, Erraid or Traigh Gheal, park at Knockvologan Farm (56.2959, -6.3451).

Sheep wander among the sand and rocks of a quiet Fidden Beach on the Isle of Mull.

Sheep monopolising the beach at Fidden Farm in the off-season



Sheep wander among the sand and rocks of a quiet Fidden Beach on the Isle of Mull.

Sheep monopolising the beach at Fidden Farm



SOUTH COAST BEACHES

A little to the west of Uisken Beach is rugged beauty Ardalanish Beach. Park near the Ardalanish Weavers (56.2919, -6.2483) and walk about 500m down to the beach. Another lovely beach reached by an easy 10 minute walk from the car park (56.2971, -6.1816) is Kilvickeon, east of Uisken. From the same car park you can hike about 1.5km south-east over moorland to Scoor Beach (Traigh Bhan Na Sgurra), a white sand beauty backed by grassy cliffs.

IONA BEACHES

Iona is reached by ferry from Fionnphort, and has a fair few of its own gorgeous beaches. At the northern end of the island there are two beaches, one facing east and one west. East facing Traigh Ban, the ‘White Strand of the Monks’, inspired the Scottish Colourists with its beautiful light, colours and views across to the Treshnish Isles and Mull. On the west coast, Port Ban is a secluded little bay, with cliffs on either side and islets off the shore.

See More From Scotland

Two surfers walk across the sand in the afternoon sun at Ceannabeinne Beach, not far from Durness on the North Coast 500 route.
An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.
Peanmeanach Bothy on the Ardnish Peninsula in February
Culross: Scotland's Best Preserved 17th century town
Two surfers walk across the sand in the afternoon sun at Ceannabeinne Beach, not far from Durness on the North Coast 500 route.
An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.
Peanmeanach Bothy on the Ardnish Peninsula in February
Culross: Scotland's Best Preserved 17th century town

TAKE A HIKE

The Isle of Mull is home to one of only two island munros in Scotland, Ben More. This is the obvious choice for anyone looking for a hike with rewarding views (weather permitting!). The easiest (but still steep) route up is from the northern side, with parking near Dhiseig (56.4490, -6.0676). It’s around 9 km return and takes approximately 5-7 hours. You can find the route description here.

Looking across Loch Scridain from a wild camp spot to Ben More, the highest mountain and only monroe on the Isle of Mull.

Looking across Loch Scridain to Ben More, the highest mountain and only munro on the Isle of Mull



Looking across Loch Scridain from a wild camp spot to Ben More, the highest mountain and only monroe on the Isle of Mull.

Looking across Loch Scridain to Ben More, the
highest mountain and only munro on Mull



There are also some great coastal hikes on Mull. The loop trail around the Treshnish Headland and Whisky Cave (once home to a moonshine distillery) is relatively straightforward and has great views. It takes around 3.5 – 4.5 hours to complete the 11km circuit (route description here). For a more challenging hike, embark on the lengthy coastal walk to Carsaig Arches, two impressive sea arches 6.5 km west of Carsaig on the south coast. You’ll follow the shoreline all of the way, negotiating plenty of rough rocks which can get wearisome for mind and legs. Hopefully the sight of the cliffside waterfall and spectacular rock formations will make it all worthwhile though. Allow around 6 hours for the 13 km return trip (route description here).

MULL HIKING TRAILS

The hiking trails mentioned above are all marked on the Maps.me app. If you download our GTWH // Isle of Mull bookmarks, we’ve dropped a pin at all of the trailheads and end points so you can find them and navigate easily.


If you’re looking for something a little more relaxing, the Calgary Art In Nature trail might be just the ticket. As the name suggests, sculptures and artworks are dotted around the woodlands behind Calgary Bay.

A wicker stag on the grassy hillside at the edge of the trees, part of the Art in Nature installation near Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull.

A wicker stag looking out towards Calgary Bay



A statue of a woman made from old fishing ropes on the hillside overlooking Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

A unique and striking sculpture



A wicker stag on the grassy hillside at the edge of the trees, part of the Art in Nature installation near Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull.

A wicker stag looking out towards Calgary Bay


A statue of a woman made from old fishing ropes on the hillside overlooking Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

A unique and striking sculpture



You can pick up a map at the shop and follow the trail to discover a wicker stag, a woman made from old fishing ropes, and plenty of other interesting pieces. The views over the bay are great, too.

GO ISLAND HOPPING

A trip to the Isle of Mull can easily turn into a bonus trip to two or three other closely connected islands.

The most popular island to visit is Iona, just 10 minutes by passenger ferry from Fionnphort. Here you can explore historic Iona Abbey, relax on numerous white sand beaches, or take a walk up Dun I hill for panoramic views over Mull, Tiree and Coll. Many people hop over to Iona for a few hours or a half day, but there are accommodation and wild camping options for those who want to stay longer.

Two people walk on the beach at Fionnphort on the Isle of Mull. Behind them is Iona, where the famous abbey can be spotted near the shore.

Looking across to Iona from the beach at Fionnphort



Two people walk on the beach at Fionnphort on the Isle of Mull. Behind them is Iona, where the famous abbey can be spotted near the shore.

Looking across to Iona from Fionnphort



Ulva is another great island hopping option, just a few minutes across the water from Mull on the small locally run Ulva Ferry. To summon the boat, slide the wooden panel over to uncover the red board at the pier. The island is community owned, having been bought out in 2018 from the previous family landowners. The Boathouse restaurant is situated right at the slipway on Ulva, a great place for lunch or drinks at the harbour-side picnic tables. There are no roads on Ulva, so if you want to explore further you’ll have to do so on two feet. There are three main walks you can do (check them out here) ranging from around 2-5 hours.

If you’re up for an adventure, one of the more unique things to do on the Isle of Mull is take a trip to Gometra. This island is connected to Ulva by a causeway and metal bridge, and requires a walk of around 12 km from the Ulva ferry. Gometra is a wild place, with just a few inhabitants who live completely off-grid. There’s an honesty shop with basic dried and tinned goods in summer, plus a small art gallery and shop, but that’s it for ‘services’. While it’s possible to walk to Gometra and back to the Ulva ferry in one long day, a better option is to wild camp or book a night or two in one of the island’s two basic bothies (see more info below).

Calmac runs the scheduled ferry service between Fionnphort and Iona. Weather permitting, the Ulva Ferry operates Monday – Friday 9am – 5pm April – October, plus Sundays in June, July and August. There is no ferry service on Saturdays. In Winter, the ferry may operate for school crossings at 9am and 3.30pm. It costs £6 return.

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DISCOVER THE LOCAL HISTORY

There are a number of historical sites to explore on Mull and Iona, including castles, standing stones and, best known of the bunch, Iona Abbey. The abbey was founded by St Columba in 563AD, who sailed from Ireland along with 12 companions. Iona is considered the birthplace of Christianity in Scotland, and remains an important Christian pilgrimage site to this day. The abbey itself is quite striking, built from distinctive Ross of Mull pink granite and celebrated for its cloister carvings and celtic crosses.

On The Isle of Mull, there are a number of historic castles, from crumbling ruins to one you can even sleep in! 13th century Duart Castle is the best known, the ancient seat of Clan Maclean. It’s clearly visible from the Oban to Craignure ferry (on the left as you’re approaching Mull), but unfortunately is covered in scaffolding most of the time. It’s open for tours from April – October (£8), or you can wander the grounds for free.

Duart Castle covered in scaffolding beneath leaden skies, seen from the ferry between Mull and mainland Scotland.

Passing by Duart Castle on the ferry from Craignure to Oban



Duart Castle covered in scaffolding beneath leaden skies, seen from the ferry between Mull and mainland Scotland.

Passing by Duart Castle on the ferry to Oban



If enigmatic old ruins are more your thing, check out 15th Century Moy Castle at Lochbuie, or 13th Century Aros Castle near Salen. While visiting Moy, be sure to include a walk to the Lochbuie Standing Stones, an atmospheric spot with lichen covered stones set in a circle about 12 metres in diameter.

And if you fancy laying your head to rest in the turret of a 19th Century castle, book a stay at Glengorm. Guest or not, it’s a good place to stop by for lunch or coffee at the cafe, housed in the old stables. They serve up fresh produce from the estate, and sell goodies at the farm shop.

GO CAMPING, GLAMPING, OR BOTHYING

One of our favourite things to do on the Isle of Mull is get outdoors and, um, stay outdoors. Camping is a great way to soak up the island vibe, enjoying the changing scenery, light, and sounds from sunrise to sunset. If you prefer something a little more quirky and comfortable, Mull has some great glamping spots. And for those looking for a quiet, back to basics retreat, a stay in a bothy is the perfect escape.

CAMPING

Wild camping opportunities abound on Mull and its neighbouring isles, with a plethora of beautiful beaches, glens, and loch-side locations to pitch up at. Just be sure to always follow the Scottish Outdoor Access Code and Leave No Trace.

A person sits draped in a blanket next to the golden glow of a campfire as day turns to night on the Isle of Mull.

Keeping warm by the campfire while wild camping on the shores of Loch Scridain



A person sits draped in a blanket next to the golden glow of a campfire as day turns to night on the Isle of Mull.

Keeping warm by the campfire while wild
camping on the shores of Loch Scridain



There are some great beach-side informal camp spots at Calgary Bay (donation welcomed, toilets nearby, tents only) and Uisken Beach (£2 per person per night, no toilets, can fetch water from nearby croft house). If you want beach camping with the usual campsite facilities, Fidden Farm is spectacular (Easter – October, £10 per person per night).

BOTHYING

Staying in a bothy is like a slightly fancier version of camping, with extra little luxuries like a fireplace, and protection from the wind and rain. There is an MBA maintained bothy called Tomsleibhe on the Glen Forsa Estate which is free to stay in, and open to all. It’s a nice and easy walk in through the glen, where you’ll no doubt meet plenty of Highland Cows and spot stags and deer. The bothy makes a great base for a hike up nearby Beinn Talaidh. Read our introduction to staying in a Scottish bothy here, and make sure you follow The Bothy Code and estate guidelines if heading to Tomsleibhe.

A hiker walks up the stony path on an overcast day towards Tomsleibhe Bothy on the Isle of Mull.

Arriving at Tomsleibhe Bothy just in time, right before the leaden skies unloaded



A hiker walks up the stony path on an overcast day towards Tomsleibhe Bothy on the Isle of Mull.

Arriving at Tomsleibhe Bothy just in time,
right before the leaden skies unloaded



Four other bothies that are privately owned and bookable through Airbnb can be found on Ulva and Gometra. While these are a bit more comfortable than your average open bothy, they are still very basic and best suited to outdoor lovers, rather than those looking for a glamping experience. Each bothy also involves a fair old walk to get to, as you can’t take your car to Ulva or Gometra. You can check out photos, get more info, and make a booking for each through Airbnb – Craigag Bothy, Ulva , Bearnus Bothy, Ulva, Teacher’s Bothy, Gometra, Jane Ann’s Bothy, Gometra.

GLAMPING

Love the idea of staying close to nature but keen for a little more comfort than your average tent or bothy? Mull has some pretty cool glamping spots which we’re sure you’ll love.

Our absolute favourite is Kittiwake, tucked away in the woodlands of Calgary Art in Nature. This idyllic wooden hut with an upturned boat for a roof is the perfect tiny home, complete with double bed, sofa, table and chairs, a wee kitchen, a wood burning stove, and an outdoor deck overlooking Calgary Bay. There’s a toilet tucked just below, and a shower by the cafe. It’s super cosy and romantic.

An eco glamping hut in the woods near Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull.

Kitiwake: an idyllic little hideaway in the woods of Calgary Art in Nature



An eco glamping hut in the woods near Calgary Bay on the Isle of Mull.

Kitiwake: an idyllic little hideaway in
the woods of Calgary Art in Nature



For a truly off-grid, back to nature experience, this Eco-Camping Hut is perfect. And for the yurt lovers out there, you can choose between staying on a working cheese farm near Tobermory (with access to a swimming pool!) or on a working croft with wonderful coastal views and easy access to Mull’s best beaches. Iona Pods is ideal for chilling out on Iona, and The Pod makes a great base for exploring all over Mull.

AIRBNB

Many of the above bothies and glamping spots are bookable through Airbnb. If you sign up for a new Airbnb account via our link you’ll get £25 off your first stay over £160, and we’ll get some credit too. Win-win!

Get £25 Discount


SOAK UP THE SCENERY

When it comes to the best things to do on Mull, our final suggestion is simply to sit back, soak up the scenery, and see where those single track roads take you. The beauty of Mull can’t always be written down in a list or planned out in an itinerary. Some of our favourite spots on the island are ones we just happened upon while driving around and keeping our eyes open. An old decaying fishing boat, an attractive stone bridge, a string of lochs perfectly lit at that exact moment. You get the idea.

An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.

The brakes were slammed on when this abandoned old beauty was spotted in the peripheral vision



An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.

Brakes were slammed on when this abandoned
old beauty was spotted in the peripheral vision



One scenic spot that we do recommend you work into that itinerary though is Eas Fors Waterfall. This series of falls and plunge pools, tumbling down the hillside, under the road, and eventually right off the edge of a cliff, is seriously beautiful.

Eas Fors Waterfall tumbling from the ciffs above the road on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

Rushing down from above the road



A person sits on a ground hugging tree branch in front of Eas Fors Waterfall on the Isle of Mull.

The lower falls are surrounded by wonderfully contorted old trees



Eas Fors Waterfall tumbling from the ciffs above the road on the Isle of Mull in Scotland.

The falls rushing down from above the road


A person sits on a ground hugging tree branch in front of Eas Fors Waterfall on the Isle of Mull.

The beautiful lower falls are surrounded by
sprawling, wonderfully contorted old trees



Park up off the road (56.5031, -6.1525) and walk above and below the stone bridge to view them all. The lower falls are particularly pretty, hidden from view from the road and framed by huge tree branches.

WHEN TO GO TO MULL

The Mull ‘season’ is roughly April to October, when all of the island’s attractions, tour operators, restaurants, etc., are open for business. This is when the weather is at its best and the majority of tourists visit. School and national holidays (like Easter and July till August) are the busiest times.

Outside of these months, Mull can be a pretty quiet place. The natural sights are, of course, still accessible. But many food and accommodation providers close their doors, boat tours cease, and attractions like Duart Castle are shut. The upside is that you’ll have the traditional tourist hotspots like Calgary Bay all to yourself, and less traffic to deal with on the single track roads. The winter colours and light can be beautiful, too. And of course, all shops and services that cater to the local community are still open.

The single track road on the west coast of the Isle of Mull in winter.

The light and colours in winter are beautiful, and the roads tend to be quiet too



The single track road on the west coast of the Isle of Mull in winter.

The light and colours in winter are beautiful,
and the country roads tend to be quiet too



HOW TO GET TO MULL

Mull is only accessible by ferry, with Calmac operating three routes from the mainland. Ferry times and schedules change throughout the year. For up to date information head to the Calmac website and search for the routes and timetables that you’re interested in.

Most people arrive and depart on the 45 minute Oban – Craignure ferry, which is ideal if you’re travelling from Glasgow, Edinburgh, and many other locations. It’s best to book far in advance for this ferry during peak season. Lochaline – Fishnish is the shortest crossing at 20 minutes, and may suit you better if coming from the north (eg. Glenfinnan, Fort William). The third route runs from Kilchoan – Tobermory, connecting Mull and Ardnamurchan, and takes 35 minutes. This route is good for connecting to Arisaig, Mallaig, The Small Isles, Skye, and beyond. No advance bookings are taken for the Lochaline and Kilchoan ferries, just show up and it’s first come, first served. You can take your car on all three ferries. If you’re on an extended Scotland road trip, it may be ideal for you to arrive and depart via different routes.

The Calmac ferry pulls into the dock at Craignure on the Isle of Mull.

The Calmac ferry arriving at Craignure, the busiest and most popular ferry terminal on the Isle of Mull



The Calmac ferry pulls into the dock at Craignure on the Isle of Mull.

The Calmac ferry arriving at Craignure, the
busiest ferry terminal on the Isle of Mull



It’s definitely beneficial to have your own car to travel around Mull. Make sure you know in advance how to drive on single track roads and use passing places. We always use Holiday Autos to book our car hire and can highly recommend them.


There is a bus service on the island, but it’ll only get you to the main towns. Various group tours depart from Edinburgh and Glasgow  – check out options and book your trip with Get Your Guide

MULL ACCOMMODATION

There are lots of B&Bs dotted around Tobermory, as well as hotels and a youth hostel. Holiday rentals are also numerous across the island, an ideal option if you’re looking to visit for a week or so. You can browse options and make a booking here, or search on the map below.

Booking.com

In addition to the places we’ve already mentioned in this guide, other campsites include Shieling Holidays, Pennygown Holiday Park, Salen Bay Campsite, Tobermory Campsite, Crannich Holiday Caravans & Touring Site, Cnoc Oran Iona Campsite, and basic Killiechronan Camping.

A lone tent at a blustery Killiechronan Campsite on the Isle of Mull

Camping at Killiechronan Campsite in rather windy conditions



A lone tent at a blustery Killiechronan Campsite on the Isle of Mull

Camping at Killiechronan in windy conditions



There are bunkhouses in Dervaig, Craignure and Ross of Mull which offer budget accommodation. There are lots of Mull accommodation options on AirBnb too.

It’s definitely advisable to book your accommodation in advance if travelling during peak summer season. Many places close over the winter between October and April, but may accept reservations if you book in advance.

9 THINGS TO DO ON THE ISLE OF MULL

That’s it for our guide to what to see and do on the Isle of Mull – for now at least. We thoroughly enjoyed our time on the island and look forward to when we can go back. Next time, we’ll visit in the spring or summer so we can take advantage of all the great seasonal activities Mull has to offer.

Have you been to Mull? Maybe you’re planning your first trip? Let us know your thoughts and impressions – or any questions you might have – in the comments below.

ORGANISE YOUR TRIP


Booking.com

*Some of the links in this post are affiliate links – if you purchase a product or service via these links, we may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps offset the cost of running this blog and keeps us travelling so that we can continue to produce great content for you. We greatly appreciate your support!*

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