• MESTIA TO USHGULI TREKKING GUIDE

    TRANSCAUCASIAN TRAIL | GEORGIA

    The village of Adishi glowing in the late afternoon sun on the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia
  • MESTIA TO USHGULI

    TRANSCAUCASIAN TRAIL

    The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREKKING GUIDE

TRANSCAUCASIAN TRAIL
SVANETI | GEORGIA

If you’ve heard of any hiking trails in Georgia, chances are it’s the Mestia to Ushguli trek in mountainous Svaneti. Part of The Transcaucasian Trail, this four day hike passes beneath snow-capped peaks, impressive glaciers, and countless historic defence towers. It’s a scenic trek but not overly challenging, with guesthouse accommodation dotted along the trail. This makes it ideal for those looking for a multi-day hiking adventure, without the need to carry camping gear or food supplies. What’s more, with trails in good condition, the max elevation below 3000 m, and the lack of any big ascents, this trek is a great option for people with wide ranging experience and fitness levels.

In this guide we cover everything you need to know about hiking from Mestia to Ushguli. This includes a detailed outline of the route, trekking distances and times, camping and accommodation options, packing lists, transport info, and more. We also provide a map and our GPX track download to help you find your way.

*Some of the links in this post are affiliate links – if you purchase a product or service via these links, we may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps offset the cost of running this blog and keeps us travelling so that we can continue to produce great content for you. We greatly appreciate your support!*

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK QUICK FACTS

            • Distance | 55 – 60 km
            • Duration | 3 – 4 days
            • Start/End | Mestia/Ushguli (or vice versa)
            • Min Elevation | 1400 m (Mestia)
            • Max Elevation | 2719 m (Chkhunderi Pass)
            • Total Ascent | approx. 3400 metres
            • Total Descent | approx. 2700 metres
            • Hiking Season | July – September (possibly mid-June – mid-October)
            • River Crossings | Adishchala river on Day 3
            • Water Sources | Streams, springs, and taps 

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK QUICK FACTS

Distance
55 – 60 km

Duration
3 – 4 days

Start/End
Mestia/Ushguli
(or vice versa)

Min Elevation
1400 m (Mestia)

Max Elevation
2719 m (Chukhunderi Pass)

Total Ascent
approx. 3400 metres

Total Descent
approx. 2700 metres

Hiking Season
July – September
(possibly mid-June – mid-October)

River Crossings
Adishchala river on Day 3

Water Sources
Streams, springs, and taps

 


WATCH OUR FILM

Watch the behind the scenes version of our Mestia to Ushguli hike on Instagram stories

Watch the behind the scenes
version of our Mestia to Ushguli
trek on Instagram stories 

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK HIKING MAP

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK

HIKING MAP

Use the map below to help guide you from Mestia to Ushguli. Tap the menu button at the top left for more details, to toggle layers on and off, and switch between satellite and terrain view.

To use an offline version of this map, download our KML file for use with Maps.me (iOS/Android), or the GPX file for use with other offline mapping apps such as Gaia (iOS/Android) or OsmAnd Maps (iOS/Android). See the expandable box below for tips on using these apps. 


To save this map to use online on desktop or mobile just tap the star symbol at the top. When you open Google Maps on your phone, navigate to ‘Saved’ at the bottom, then swipe along to ‘Maps’ at the top. You’ll find this map in your list of maps.

On desktop, click the three lines at the top left, select ‘Your Places’, then ‘Maps’. Click the map, then scroll down and select ‘Open in My Maps’ to access the interactive version.

Alternatively, just tap the rectangle symbol at the top right of the map in this blog post to view the My Maps version larger on desktop.

Unfortunately, it’s not possible to view this version of the map offline, but we’ve provided a download for a similar version for offline use.


MAPS.ME

Maps.me is our go-to offline mapping app. We find it straightforward to use for planning routes in advance, as well as navigating on the trail. It doesn’t drain our phone battery, and it’s quick and easy to save and organise ‘bookmarks’. There are many trails already marked on Maps.me, plus you can download and import a KML track of your route to the app. 

To use Maps.me, first download the app (iOS/Android). Hover over the region or country that you want to visit and the app will prompt you to download this map. Once downloaded, it can be viewed offline. 

You can tap anywhere and save it as a ‘bookmark’ by tapping the star symbol at the bottom. Hit ‘Edit Bookmark’ to personalise the bookmark colour, organise your bookmarks into different folders, and rename them. 

You can navigate easily or plan routes in advance by tapping your start point and selecting ‘route from’, then tapping your end point and selecting ‘route to’. Tap the car, walking, or cycling symbol at the top of the screen to indicate your mode of travel. If you want to plot a different route to the one suggested by Maps.me, just tap a third (or fourth, fifth, etc.) bookmark between the start and end points and select ‘add stop’. 

Maps.me shows the distance and travel time, plus elevation profiles for hiking trails. Note that the estimated time isn’t always reliable, but we’ve always found the distance and elevation gain/loss to be largely accurate. It only shows very basic contour lines.

You can track your progress on the trail using GPS. The arrow shows your direction of travel. Tap the compass at the top right of the screen to keep the map in a fixed position (the arrow will rotate). Alternatively, tap the arrow at the bottom right of the screen to rotate the map in the direction of travel (the arrow will stay in a fixed position).

GAIA

Gaia (iOS/Android) is another offline mapping app that is very useful. It shows the contours in much more detail than Maps.me, as long as you have previously viewed the section of map online. With a paid membership you can download various maps in advance for offline use. The app has existing OpenStreetMap trails marked and you can import GPX tracks and view them offline. You can also create new routes online yourself and export them as GPX or KML files. You can navigate easily on the trail using the arrow that shows your GPS location. Unlike with Maps.me, it isn’t possible to quickly check distances between two points (or at least we haven’t figured out a way to do it). There are a lot of useful features in the free version and even more benefits if you have a paid annual membership, so if you spend a lot of time outdoors it is worthwhile learning how to use the app to its full advantage. 

In our experience, Gaia drains your phone battery much quicker than Maps.me, even in flight mode, so it’s best to shut down the app completely each time you finish using it. 

OSMAND MAPS

OsmAnd Maps (iOS/Android) is another great offline mapping app with lots of useful features. In our opinion, it’s not as intuitive as Maps.me, and it has so many features that it can be a bit overwhelming at first. Like Gaia, we recommend checking out the written and video tutorials on the OsmAnd website to learn how to fully use the app. The benefits of the app include being able to plot routes in advance and save them as GPX tracks, and to view detailed elevation and terrain information, including surface types. You can also import GPX tracks. One downside is that the free version does not include contour lines, but these can be added via a paid plugin.


MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK BREAKDOWN

We’ve broken down the Mestia to Ushguli trek into separate days and sections below.

We’ve also given approximate timings and distances for each day and section, as well as approximate figures for elevation gain and loss. The total daily figures for elevation gain and loss are based on our recorded route using Garmin and may not be 100% accurate, but they are a good guide of what to expect. The elevation gain and loss figures for each hiking section are estimates based on our recorded track and mapping apps.

The timings are based around average hiking speeds and are intended as a rough guide. If you’re a fast hiker it may take you less time, and conversely, if you’re a slow hiker it may take you longer.

ELEVATION PROFILE AND 3D ROUTE MAP VIDEO

Mestia to Ushguli Elevation Profile

The elevation profile of the trek, starting at Mestia and finishing at Ushguli



DAY 1 | MESTIA → CHVABIANI/ZHABESHI

15-16 km | + 688 m / – 478 m | 4 – 6 hours

DAY 1

MESTIA
CHVABIANI/ZHABESHI

15 – 16 km

+ 688 m / – 478 m

4 – 6 hours

Day 1 starts with a fairly relaxed 500 metre climb to a viewpoint looking towards Tetnuldi mountain, with Ushba prominent behind. The route then descends to the valley floor, passing through villages and ending up at Chvabiani or Zhabeshi. There is a fair amount of road walking, although most of it is on old or disused tracks. Expect the sound of construction to carry through the valleys on both sides of the viewpoint, from industrial enterprises near Mestia and Cholashi.

The quality of guesthouses in Chvabiani/Zhabeshi is generally good, with hosts used to catering to a steady stream of hiking and skiing tourists throughout the year.

MESTIA → VIEWPOINT | 6 km | + 520 m / – 28 m  | 1.5 – 2.5 hours

MESTIA → VIEWPOINT

6 km | + 520 m / – 28 m

1.5 – 2.5 hours

The trail leads out of Mestia on a dirt road track, passing Hotels Tetnuldi and Banguriani. It’s a gentle climb, with a view of Mt Ushba appearing on your left. At the trekking signpost, turn right up the hill and continue following it around to the left. There is a spring marked on Maps.me here, but we found it to be dry in late September.

After about 1.8 km, you’ll reach another trekking signpost. From here it’s a short, steep climb through the forest to where the trail joins an old road. Turn right and follow the road around as it curves to the left, where wonderful views of pyramid-like Tetnuldi peak open up ahead of you. The biggest climb is now done for the day, and this makes a great rest spot before continuing through the villages in the valley below.

We found our first water source of the day here (in late September), a pipe spouting water in the midst of a marshy field near the trekking signpost. We’re not sure if this is a permanent feature or not. Some construction had been going on and the water pipe was laid in a trench dug through the field –  water was flowing out at the end and seemingly slowly flooding the field. The spring marked on Maps.me was nowhere to be found.

A hiker stands looking towards the pyramidal shape of Mount Tetnuldi at the high point of Day 1 on the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia

Stopping to appreciate the view of Tetnuldi before descending into the valley below



A hiker stands looking towards the pyramidal shape of Mount Tetnuldi at the high point of Day 1 on the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia

Stopping to appreciate the view of Tetnuldi
before descending into the valley below



VIEWPOINT → LAKHIRI | 4 km | + 81 m / – 198 m | 1 – 1.5 hours

VIEWPOINT → LAKHIRI

4 km | + 81 m / – 198 m

1 – 1.5 hours

From the forest clearing the trail leads down to the valley and through a few small villages, winding up at Chvabiani, or a little further on at Zhabeshi. We took a higher trail, leading us to a wonderful viewpoint of Lakhiri village and its numerous towers, before descending to the river.

The high trail route branches off to the left about 250 metres after starting the descent. It undulates around the hillside for about 3.5 km, before leading you straight through the fields to Lakhiri. The view just before the village, with Tetnuldi rising in the background, is one of our favourite village scenes on the trek.

Many traditional Svanetian towers line the hillside in the village of Lakhiri, with Mount Tetnuldi rising behind, seen on the first day of the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia

This view of the towers in Lakhiri is reason enough to stay on the high trail instead of descending earlier to the road



Many traditional Svanetian towers line the hillside in the village of Lakhiri, with Mount Tetnuldi rising behind, seen on the first day of the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia

This view of the towers in Lakhiri is reason enough
to stay on the high trail instead of descending earlier



LAKHIRI → CHVABIANI/ZHABESHI | 5 – 6 km | + 87 m / – 252 m | 1.5 – 2 hours

LAKHIRI →
CHVABIANI/ZHABESHI

5 – 6 km | + 87 m / – 252 m

1.5 – 2 hours

Turn right in Lakhiri and head south down the hill, all the way to Zhamushi village. Turn left here and continue east, crossing a small wooden bridge at the river. Carry on walking along the dirt road to Cholashi and down to the car bridge below. After crossing the bridge you join the road on the south bank of the Mulkhura river, just beyond a noisy industrial site. Turn left and continue for 2 – 3 km, depending on which village you choose to stay in. This final stretch on the road is the least pleasant section of the day.

See More From Georgia

Two hikers traverse the grassy ridge on Day 2 of the Panorama Trail
A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike
The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia
A hiker on the steep final approach to Gul Pass, on the Chuberi to Mestia section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti
Mountains reflected in Kelitsadi Lake on a still morning
Two hikers and a dog rest on a rock in front of an unnamed lake on the Black Rock Lake trek
A hiker climbs the shale switchback trail to Atsunta Pass on the Shatili Omalo trek, with the layered mountains of Khevsureti behind
A hiker descends the switchback ridgeline trail from Chaukhi Pass to Abudelauri Lakes on the Juta to Roshka trek in Georgia
Snow capped Mt. Kazbek shining bright at sunrise, as seen from the town of Kazbegi (Stepantsminda) in northern Georgia
The settlement of Abano in Truso Valley, with the old monastery on the right and Zakagori Fortress seen behind
One of the best views of Gergeti Trinity Church, seen from the hiking trail to Gergeti Glacier and Mt. Kazbek
Hikers descend from the viewpoint at Kojori Fortress in Georgia
A UAZ Buhanka campervan parked at the side of a grassy track to Levani's Lake on the expansive Javakheti Plateau
A person walks beneath the huge dusty sky looking at the seemingly endless hazy view at Takhti-Tepha Mud Volcanoes in the Vashlovani Protected Area
Two people watch something in the distance from outside a parked 4x4 vehicle in the hills of Racha, Georgia.
Two hikers traverse the grassy ridge on Day 2 of the Panorama Trail
A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike
The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia
A hiker on the steep final approach to Gul Pass, on the Chuberi to Mestia section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti
Mountains reflected in Kelitsadi Lake on a still morning
Two hikers and a dog rest on a rock in front of an unnamed lake on the Black Rock Lake trek
A hiker climbs the shale switchback trail to Atsunta Pass on the Shatili Omalo trek, with the layered mountains of Khevsureti behind
A hiker descends the switchback ridgeline trail from Chaukhi Pass to Abudelauri Lakes on the Juta to Roshka trek in Georgia
Snow capped Mt. Kazbek shining bright at sunrise, as seen from the town of Kazbegi (Stepantsminda) in northern Georgia
The settlement of Abano in Truso Valley, with the old monastery on the right and Zakagori Fortress seen behind
One of the best views of Gergeti Trinity Church, seen from the hiking trail to Gergeti Glacier and Mt. Kazbek
Hikers descend from the viewpoint at Kojori Fortress in Georgia
A UAZ Buhanka campervan parked at the side of a grassy track to Levani's Lake on the expansive Javakheti Plateau
A person walks beneath the huge dusty sky looking at the seemingly endless hazy view at Takhti-Tepha Mud Volcanoes in the Vashlovani Protected Area
Two people watch something in the distance from outside a parked 4x4 vehicle in the hills of Racha, Georgia.

DAY 2 | CHVABIANI → ADISHI (HIGH ROUTE)

12.5 km | + 1184 m / – 693 m | 4 – 6 hours

DAY 1

CHVABIANI
ADISHI

12.5 km

+ 1184 m / – 693 m

4 – 6 hours

Day 2 is the shortest in terms of distance, but involves the biggest climb of the Mestia to Ushguli trek. What’s more, the 850 metre ascent up the hillside behind Chvabiani and Zhabeshi comes at the very start of the day, so you’ll need to muster all your energy from the get-go! Once at the top, you can choose to continue climbing an extra 250 metres before turning off on the scenic ‘High Route’ to Adishi, or take the shorter, quicker, and less picturesque ‘Low Route’. The last 1 – 3 km of the climb (depending on whether you take the ‘Low’ or ‘High’ route) is on gravel road and is definitely the lowlight of the day (see cable car info box below on how to skip this). On the plus side, in good weather, you’ll have excellent views of Ushba, Tetnuldi, and many more impressive snowy peaks.

Adishi village feels more remote than any other on the trek, nestled in a narrow valley far from the main Mestia to Ushguli road. It only comes into view at the very last moment of your hike and looks particularly impressive with a golden hour glow. The quality of guesthouses here is generally not as good. The hosts are used to catering to hikers staying just one night during trekking season, rather than benefiting from year-round tourism and multi-day stays (which tends to encourage better service levels).

Our GPX/KML track follows the ‘High Route’ outlined above.

CHVABIANI → LOW ROUTE TURN-OFF | 5.3 km | + 851 m / – 7 m | 2 – 3 hours

CHVABIANI →
LOW ROUTE TURN-OFF

5.3 km | + 851 m / – 7 m

2 – 3 hours

The trails from Chvabiani and Zhabeshi meet on the hillside above the villages, so there’s no need to continue along the road to Zhabeshi if you stayed in Chvabiani.

Either way, the morning starts with a heart pumping climb the moment you leave your guesthouse. There are many small trails, gullies, and fenced off fields near the start, so keep an eye on your GPS to stay on track.

It’s a fairly steady climb for about 2-3 hours, depending on how often you stop. The trail alternates between forest sections and open hillside. There are a few steeper parts here and there, with the trail flattening out a bit as you approach the road. The mountain views get increasingly more impressive as you climb higher.

In late September, we found the springs marked on Maps.me to be dry, with no water source until we reached the stream on the ‘high route’. If you’re hiking later in the season, we recommend leaving your guesthouse with enough water to last the duration of the climb.

Emerging at the wide gravel road leading up to Tetnuldi ski resort is a bit jarring, especially with the mammoth cable car pylon looming overhead. From here it’s less than 1 km and a climb of 120 metres on the road to reach the turn-off for the low route to Adishi (signposted).

Following this trail will soon lead you past a small cafe hut, and down to Adishi in around an hour.

The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

Look back on the climb for mountain views: the twin peaks of Ushba on the left, Chatyn-Tau on the right



The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

Look back on the climb for mountain views: the twin
peaks of Ushba on the left, Chatyn-Tau on the right



LOW ROUTE TURN-OFF → ADISHI (VIA HIGH ROUTE) | 7.2 km | + 333 m / – 686 m | 2 – 3 hours

LOW ROUTE TURN-OFF →
ADISHI (VIA HIGH ROUTE)

7.2 km | + 333 m / – 686 m

2 – 3 hours

If, like us, you opt for the high route, then you’ve still got a bit to climb on the energy-sapping road. To reach the turn-off for the high trail, marked with a white ‘Peak Tetnuld’ trekking signpost, climb another 250 metres and walk 2 km further.

The views of Tetnuldi and the surrounding valleys are wonderful, but after a long slog uphill on the road, it does feel a bit like the scenic stretch of high trail is over in a flash before you start descending. It takes around 45 minutes to hike the undulating trail, from the turn-off to the start of the steep grassy descent. Around halfway, you cross a small stream which is perfect for filling up water.

A hiker approaching the turn-off for the high trail to Adishi on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

Approaching the end of the road section and the start of the high route to Adishi



A hiker approaching the turn-off for the high trail to Adishi on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

Approaching the end of the road section
and the start of the high route to Adishi



There’s not much of a trail to follow on the descent, so pay close attention to your GPS track and watch your footing – the final section before joining the low route trail is the steepest and hiking poles are a good idea. It takes 45 minutes or so to descend. Once you’ve joined the low route it’s a short distance downhill to the picturesquely situated village of Adishi.

The village of Adishi glowing in the late afternoon sun on the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia

The village of Adishi looking particularly dramatic in the late afternoon sun with overcast skies



The village of Adishi glowing in the late afternoon sun on the Mestia to Ushguli section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti, Georgia

Adishi village looking particularly dramatic
in the late afternoon sun with overcast skies



Phone reception is very poor here, so don’t expect to be able to use your data. If there’s anything essential you want to check (upcoming weather for example), check it up on the hillside beforehand.

SKIP THE ROAD, TAKE THE CABLE CAR

If you’re keen to take the more scenic ‘high route’ to Adishi, you can skip the 330 metre climb on gravel road by taking the lowest line of the Tetnuldi Cable Car. You’ll bypass the least enjoyable part of the day, and from the exit station it’s an easy stroll to the turn-off for the high trail.

The usual trail from Chvabiani/Zhabeshi emerges from the forest around 1 km uphill from the entry cable car station. So if you want to take the cable car, it’s better to take an alternative route up from Chvabiani/Zhabeshi which will take you right to the station. This route is marked on Maps.me, leaving the main route approx. 1 km from and 150 metres above the villages. Of course, it’s best to check in advance that the cable car is actually operating.


DAY 3 | ADISHI → IPRALI

17 – 19 km | + 903 / – 1025 m | 5 – 8 hours

DAY 3

ADISHI
IPRALI

17 – 19 km

+ 903 m / – 1025 m

5 – 8 hours

Day 3 is the undoubted highlight of the Mestia to Ushguli trek. You get up close to the magnificent Adishi glacier and spend almost the entire day on trail surrounded by mountains. It’s the longest day in terms of both distance and time, but the ascent to Chkhunderi Pass involves much less of a climb than the day before. Whether you’re crossing the Adishchala river on foot or by horse, aim to get there in the morning before glacier meltwater swells it further.

To prolong the ‘remote’ feeling, the largely abandoned Khalde village makes a good overnight stop instead of Iprali.

ADISHI → ADISHCHALA RIVER | 5.6 km | + 226 m / – 41 m | 1.5 – 2 hours

ADISHI →
ADISHCHALA RIVER

5.6 km | + 226 m / – 41 m

1.5 – 2 hours

From Adishi the trail meanders along the hillside for around 5 km, with the Adishchala river flowing to your right. There’s one notable fork in the trail. When you reach it, look for the waymarked rock and take the left path.

As you round the corner after an hour and a half or so, the magnificent Adishi Glacier comes into view. Keep following the trail until it reaches the riverbank. You need to cross this river one way or another in order to continue up the tree-covered hillside opposite. Depending on the time of year, the river can be a wide, deep, fast flowing torrent of water, or an altogether less threatening beast.

CROSSING THE ADISHCHALA RIVER
CROSSING THE ADISHCHALA

When the river is high, from spring till late August/early September, the safest and easiest way to cross is by horse. During the peak trekking season (July-August), local guys hang around by the river in the morning, charging 20 GEL to carry you and your backpack across. You can also hire a horse from your guesthouse in Adishi if you are trekking outside of peak season and want to guarantee a horse for the crossing (expect this to cost more).

In September and October, the water level is at its lowest, making a crossing on foot usually more manageable. The water is still pretty fast flowing but is likely to be below your knees. It is absolutely freezing though, literally glacier meltwater, so it’s best to cross quickly but carefully and spend as little time in the water as possible.

In our experience, crossing in late September, the river was about 5 – 6 metres wide. The actual point to cross wasn’t as obvious as we were expecting (the usual telltale cluster of horses and trekkers by the crossing was absent), and there were steep embankments on the opposite side. We looked up and downriver for a while, scouting out the best place to cross, eventually settling on the spot marked on Maps.me (not the spot marked on the TCT GPX track). It looked easy enough to clamber up the embankment on the other side, where we assumed (correctly) that we’d pick up the trail.

A good place to ford the Adishchala river on the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

A good place to ford the Adishchala river on foot, a little further upstream from where the horses usually cross



A good place to ford the Adishchala river on the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia

A good place to ford the Adishchala river
on foot, a little further upstream from
where the horses usually cross



We recommend changing into sandals for the crossing. It is a good idea to use hiking poles for stability and checking the depth. They also help you check for obstacles before each step. You cannot see the bottom and there are rocks underfoot.

If in doubt about crossing the Adishchala, go with the safest option and hire a horse. Accidents can (and have) happened, with people being swept off their feet and carried far down river. In water this cold, hypothermia will kick in very quickly, so don’t take any unnecessary risks.

ADISHCHALA RIVER → CHKHUNDERI PASS | 2.4 km | + 457 m | 1 – 2 hours

ADISHCHALA RIVER
→ CHKHUNDERI PASS

2.4 km | + 457 m

1 – 2 hours

Once you’ve crossed the Adishchala River, the trail up to the Chkhunderi Pass is quite obvious. The initial section is narrow and can be overgrown, with some steep bits here and there. Beyond the initial switchbacks there is a wonderful viewpoint looking straight across to Adishi Glacier, marked as ‘splendid view of the glacier’ on Maps.me (and we’d have to agree!).

Shortly after this viewpoint you’ll reach a spring where you can fill water. The rocky bit of trail leading up to it is a bit wet so watch your footing. From the spring, the trail makes a sharp right turn and starts heading south-west towards the pass. It becomes wider, with more open views as you climb above the trees and enter rhododendron land. The last stretch towards the pass is nice and flat. If you’re trekking in Autumn, the colours around here are glorious.

Two hikers look across to impressive Adishi Glacier from a viewpoint on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Coming off the trail to appreciate the face-to-face view of Adishi Glacier



Two hikers look across to impressive Adishi Glacier from a viewpoint on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Coming off the trail to appreciate the
face-to-face view of Adishi Glacier



RIDGE SIDE HIKE (RETURN) | 1.4 km | +/- 96 m | 30 mins

RIDGE SIDE HIKE (RETURN)

1.4 km | +/- 96 m

30 mins

From Chkhunderi Pass there is an easy, well trodden trail leading along the ridge to the left. It’s well worth the short side hike to the viewpoint, which is around 100 metres higher than the pass itself. The views of Adishi Glacier are spectacular, as are those of the mountains and glaciers to the east. You can dump your bag at the pass and make the trip there and back in about 30 minutes.

Glaciers and mountains seen under moody skies while the sun shines through, from the ridge above Chkhunderi Pass on the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti

Looking northeast from the ridge viewpoint on a dramatic day of light and shadow



Glaciers and mountains seen under moody skies while the sun shines through, from the ridge above Chkhunderi Pass on the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti

Looking northeast from the ridge viewpoint
on a dramatic day of light and shadow



CHKHUNDERI PASS → KHALDESCHALA VALLEY | 2.8 km | – 473 m | 45 – 60 mins

CHKHUNDERI PASS →
KHALDESCHALA VALLEY

2.8 km | – 473 m

45 – 60 mins

The descent to the Khaldeschala valley takes around an hour. The trail works its way down an open grassy hillside, crossing a stream about halfway where you can fill water. There are some slightly overgrown sections further down, and the final part of the descent to the old shepherds’ huts and trekking signpost is a bit steep.

KHALDESCHALA VALLEY → IPRALI | 6.8 km, + 220 m / – 511 m | 1.5 – 2 hours

KHALDESCHALA VALLEY
→ IPRALI

6.8 km | + 220 m / – 511 m

1.5 – 2 hours

Turning right at the signpost, the trail turns into an old, disused road, and runs high up above the Khaldeschala river. It’s an easy walk, gently descending for around 4 km to Khalde village. The road crosses a few streams and has impressive views down into a narrow gorge at one point. Just don’t get too close to the edge!

Khalde village is largely abandoned. Ruined houses and towers are all that remain besides the Khalde Guesthouse, and the brand new Qaldea Resort tucked into the hillside below. It makes for a more atmospheric overnight stay than Iprali in our opinion, but Khalde Guesthouse was closed and Qaldea Resort was still under construction when we passed through, so we didn’t have the pleasure.

Continue for a further 2.9 km on a wide dirt road to reach Iprali, a small village that sits above the Mestia – Ushguli road.

A snaking waterfall is illuminated briefly by the afternoon sun, in the Khaldeschala valley on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The sun shines through after rain



A jagged mountain peak appearing from the mist in the Kaldeschala valley on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Mountain peaks and moody skies



The narrow Khaldeschala river tumbles through a steep-sided gorge thick with vegetation, on Day 3 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The river rushing through the gorge



A snaking waterfall is illuminated briefly by the afternoon sun, in the Khaldeschala valley on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The sun shines through after rain


A jagged mountain peak appearing from the mist in the Kaldeschala valley on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Mountain peaks and moody skies


The narrow Khaldeschala river tumbles through a steep-sided gorge thick with vegetation, on Day 3 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The river rushing through the gorge



DAY 4 | IPRALI → USHGULI

12.5 km | + 632 m / – 511 m | 3.5 – 5 hours

DAY 1

IPRALI
USHGULI

12.5 km

+ 632 m / – 511 m

3.5 – 5 hours

Day 4, the final section on the Mestia to Ushguli trek, can be a very different experience depending on the route you choose to take. The road connecting Iprali and Ushguli is one option, but a soul destroying one if you ask us. A much more enjoyable hike can be had on a forested hillside trail running high above the valley floor, connecting with the dusty road only for a short time towards the end.

Ushguli feels different yet again from the other villages visited on the trek. It’s a sprawling collection of four villages, with old towers and houses tumbling down the hillside, and the impressive Shkhara Mountain looming behind. Original stone roofed dwellings sit beside more practical metal-roofed homes, a hodgepodge of old meets new which is characteristic of many remote Georgian mountain communities these days. If you’re expecting a time-warped village, this isn’t it, but it remains an atmospheric place nonetheless.

IPRALI → DAVBERI | 2.6 km | + 79 m / – 200 m | 45 – 60 mins

IPRALI → DAVBERI

2.6 km | + 79 m / – 200 m

45 – 60 mins

The dirt road continues from Iprali all the way down to the river where it joins the main Mestia to Ushguli road. Before you reach the car bridge, turn left up a trail between old houses. Climb the small wooden ladder over the gate and continue around to the right, on an overgrown grassy trail behind the houses. This leads straight up to Davberi village.

DAVBERI → USHGULI ROAD | 7 km | + 473 m / – 264 m | 2 – 3 hours

DAVBERI → USHGULI ROAD

7 km | + 473 m / – 264 m

2 – 3 hours

Make a hairpin left turn immediately at the first house in Davberi. Continue up the path, ignoring the trails leading off to the right and left. The wider path curves northward and turns into a narrow rocky trail with steep grassy embankments either side. After a short, steep climb through this gully, the trail turns to the right and heads east.

You’ll keep climbing to an altitude of around 2100 m before the trail becomes more undulating and finally leads back to the road. This section of the route alternates between open fields, grassy hillsides, and dense forest, with a couple of short but steep parts after the second stream. It was the most overgrown trail we experienced on the entire Mestia to Ushguli hike, but easy to follow once you’re on it.

Campers – note that there are two spots marked for camping on Maps.me and other OSM apps along this trail, but we found both to be completely overgrown and unsuitable.

A view of the Mestia to Ushguli road from the hiking trail above

The Mestia to Ushguli road snaking through the valley far below



A hiker on a narrow sun-dappled forest trail on the final day of the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Forested section of the trail



A view of the Mestia to Ushguli road from the hiking trail above

The Mestia to Ushguli road snaking
through the valley below the trail


A hiker on a narrow sun-dappled forest trail on the final day of the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Forested section of the trail



ROAD → USHGULI | 2.9 km | + 80 m / – 47 m | 45 – 60 mins

ROAD → USHGULI

2.9 km | + 80 m / – 47 m

45 – 60 mins

Joining the dusty road you’ll soon spot the ‘Ushguli’ sign signalling the imminent end of your trek. Thankfully, you don’t have to walk on it for too long. Branch off to the right when you reach the fork (at the ‘Right Way’ sign). A less busy road leads up through Murkmeli village, the first in the Ushguli community.

You can continue on the road but it’s more pleasant to cross the bridge over the Enguri river, just beyond the houses. Climb a few metres up the grassy hillside and continue on a trail heading east, parallel to the river. You’ll pass through a couple of gates*, then over a bridge to Chazhashi, the lower of the three villages making up the main part of Ushguli.

The stone towers and houses of Zhibiani and Chvibiani - upper Ushguli - glowing in the afternoon sun, a fine sight to greet you at the end of the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The upper villages of the Ushguli community



The stone towers and houses of Zhibiani and Chvibiani - upper Ushguli - glowing in the afternoon sun, a fine sight to greet you at the end of the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The upper villages of the Ushguli community



Depending on your schedule and/or choice of accommodation, you can carry on up the rocky dirt streets through Chvibiani and Zhibiani, the middle and top villages of Ushguli. The views of Shkhara and other snowcapped peaks are usually best appreciated from the very top of Ushguli, in the morning before the clouds set in.

*Note that as of 2021, one of those gates now has a private property sign and the owners are charging 2 GEL for passage.

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM GEORGIA’S MOST POPULAR TREK

The Mestia to Ushguli trek is Georgia’s most popular trek by some distance. If people travelling to the country do only one multi-day hike, it’s very likely to be this one. As mentioned above, it’s scenic and culturally interesting, but not overly challenging, making it suitable for people with wide ranging experience and fitness levels.

However, it’s worth keeping in mind that most popular doesn’t necessarily mean the best. There has been a lot of exaggerated stuff written about this hike. It has frequently been described as ‘stunning’ and ‘remote’, but in our opinion, much of the route is quite ordinary. Day 3 from Adishi to Khalde/Iprali is the clear standout, with exceptional glacier and mountain views, plus the excitement of the river crossing. But on the whole, we felt that it ranked well below many other multi-day treks in Georgia. And in Svaneti itself, the two days before Mestia, from Etseri to Mazeri and Mazeri to Mestia, have much more appeal than the majority of the Mestia to Ushguli trek.

Adishi Glacier under bright sunlight while the mountains above lay under the shadow of heavy clouds, seen from the trail up to Chkhunderi Pass on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The views of Adishi Glacier help provide some ‘wow’ moments on the Mestia to Ushguli trek



Adishi Glacier under bright sunlight while the mountains above lay under the shadow of heavy clouds, seen from the trail up to Chkhunderi Pass on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

The views of Adishi Glacier help provide some
‘wow’ moments on the Mestia to Ushguli trek



Nonetheless, it remains a great option for the reasons previously outlined. We just think it’s important to recognise that there are many other trekking options in Georgia. We also hope that more people travel to Svaneti without the ‘Mestia to Ushguli’ blinkers on, so they don’t miss out on some of the best scenery and hiking the region has to offer.

WHEN TO TREK FROM MESTIA TO USHGULI

Unlike Tusheti, Svaneti is accessible year-round, however the hiking trails are covered in snow in winter and many guesthouses close. The trekking season usually extends from mid-June to mid-October, with July to September being the ideal trekking time. The trail is generally quieter at the start and end of the season. It can be very rainy in June, meaning lush green hillsides but cloudy skies and swollen rivers. Water levels tend to be much lower from September, making the river crossing easier, but leaving some springs dry.

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MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK PRACTICALITIES

Hiking the Transcaucasian Trail between Mestia and Ushguli takes most people 4 days, although it’s possible to combine Days 1 and 2, completing the trek in 3 days. Guesthouses are available in villages along the way, but there are plenty of places to camp if you prefer. We’ve covered a few practicalities below to help you prepare for your trek.

CAMPING AND GUESTHOUSES

It is possible to stay in guesthouses every night on the Mestia to Ushguli trek. The usual stops are in Chvabiani or Zhabeshi, Adishi, Khalde or Iprali, and finally in Ushguli. Guesthouses offer meals, private rooms, and shared bathrooms. Dinner, bed, and breakfast is normally 50 – 75 GEL per person.

Of course, you don’t have to stay in guesthouses. If you prefer to camp you can do so for the entire trek, carrying food supplies with you or eating in guesthouses along the way. We’ve marked possible camp spots on our map and we cover guesthouses in more detail below.

FOOD

There are cafes and restaurants in Mestia and a few in Ushguli, but the only place to buy meals during the hike is at guesthouses (you can eat at them even if you are camping). It is usually around 10 GEL for breakfast or lunch, and 15 – 20 GEL for dinner. It’s a good idea to bring some hiking snacks with you from Mestia, such as dried fruit, nuts or Snickers.

Guesthouse meals generally consist of potatoes, soup, chistvari (fried corn bread stuffed with cheese), Khachapuri, cheese, salad, and bread. Breakfast often resembles dinner a little too closely, with the addition of eggs. You can ask for Khachapuri to carry with you for lunch, or pay for a ‘lunch box’ which will usually include tomatoes, cucumber, a boiled egg, bread, etc.

WATER

There are streams and mountain springs situated along the trail. Some springs run dry later in the season, so be aware that those marked on mapping apps can’t always be relied upon. Personally, we always sterilise drinking water collected from streams (using a Steripen), and we recommend you use your prefered sterilisation method to do the same. For good, ready-to-drink water there are taps in almost every village, and you can also fill up at guesthouses.

A traditonal Svan tower in Cholashi on the Mestia to Ushguli trail

Traditional Svan tower in Cholashi on Day 1 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek



A traditonal Svan tower in Cholashi on the Mestia to Ushguli trail

Traditional Svan tower in Cholashi on
Day 1 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek



MAPS AND NAVIGATION

The Mestia to Ushguli hiking trail is waymarked and signposted. However, it’s advisable to use an offline mapping app such as Maps.me, Gaia, or OSMand to follow the route via GPS. You can download our KML/GPX tracks to use with these apps. The Transcaucasian Trail website also has a downloadable KMZ file of the route.

MONEY

There are ATMs in Mestia but nowhere else in Svaneti. Bring enough cash (in small denominations) to pay for meals and guesthouses. Cards are not accepted. Budget 50 – 75 GEL per person per night for dinner, bed, and breakfast.

PHONE RECEPTION AND INTERNET

You can’t rely on phone reception and a data connection for the entire Mestia to Ushguli trek. However, in most villages and at many places on the trail you will be able to get a signal with a Magticom SIM. Service is particularly patchy around Adishi. Remember to set any webpages you want to reference on the trail to ‘read offline’ beforehand.

WEATHER FORECASTS

Yr.no is the best weather app (iOS/Android) we know of. It doesn’t work offline, but it is very useful for checking the weather in advance. If you have a Garmin InReach like us, you can get weather reports at any location.

Sunlight and shadow on the Adishchala valley, seen from Chkhunderi Pass on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Looking back towards Adishi from Chkhunderi Pass on a day of dramatic weather



Sunlight and shadow on the Adishchala valley, seen from Chkhunderi Pass on the Mestia to Ushguli trek

Looking back towards Adishi from Chkhunderi
Pass on a day of changeable and dramatic weather



TRAVEL INSURANCE FOR TREKKING AT ALTITUDE

It’s important to note that most travel insurance providers will only cover hiking up to a certain altitude as standard (often 2500 m or 3000 m). In order to be covered for hiking above this, you will probably need to add on an ‘activity pack’ or such like. The highest point on the Mestia to Ushguli trek sits above 2700 m, so make sure you check in advance whether your travel insurance policy covers you or not.

 Whether you are currently in your home country or are already travelling, two travel insurance policy providers that can cover for hiking above 3000 m are World Nomads (for residents of 140+ countries) and True Traveller (for UK and EEA residents only). We have purchased travel insurance policies from both of these companies in the past. We have found their policies to be comprehensive, and their online claims and extension processes straightforward.

If you still need to organise your travel insurance, we’d suggest getting a quote from each to see which suits you best.

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREK PACKING LIST

There are a number of things we recommend packing in order to make your Mestia to Ushguli trek run smoothly and safely. We’ve compiled some useful lists and provided more info below.

ALL WEATHER CLOTHING

Make sure you pack clothing for all weather eventualities. The weather can be very unpredictable, change quickly, and vary greatly between the lower and higher altitudes. You need waterproofs and layers (including a base layer, mid layer, and outer layer). Ideally your base layers should be made from merino wool or sweat-wicking material. Avoid jeans or any cotton materials – if they get wet they are heavy, take forever to dry, and you’ll get cold easily. A hat, gloves and sunglasses are also needed. Make sure you have proper footwear (ideally hiking boots) that are broken in already. It’s a good idea to pack a pair of sandals too for the wearing around camp/guesthouses.

Merino T-Shirts x 2
His/Hers

Merino Thermal Baselayer
His/Hers
(if camping)

Merino Thermal Leggings
His/Hers
(if camping)

Merino Underwear
His/Hers

Sports Bra x 2

Fleece
His/Hers

Down Jacket (if early/late in season)
His/Hers

Rain Jacket/Shell
His/Hers

Waterproof Trousers
His/Hers

Quick Drying Hiking Trousers
(preferably with zip-off shorts)
His/Hers

Trousers to wear around camp/guesthouses
(Lightweight, similar to above)

Trekking Socks x 2
His/Hers

Warm Socks for night x 1
(if early/late in season)

Buff

Gloves
Liner & Waterproof Outer

Sun Hat

Warm Hat (if early/late in season)

Sunglasses

Hiking Boots
His/Hers

Sandals for evening

Bandana
Soak it in the river and tie it round your neck or wrists to keep you cool

Belt
You might lose weight on the trek!


HIKING GEAR

You’ll need the usual hiking gear, such as a backpack, hiking poles, a refillable water bottle or water bladder, a water purification method, a first aid kit, rubbish bags for carrying out all your waste, a headtorch, and suncream.

50-70L Backpack + rain cover

Hiking Poles

Water Bladder/Water Bottle

Water Purifier (eg. Steripen, purification tablets, LifeStraw, etc.)

First Aid Kit

Penknife

Maps (offline GPS + paper)

Rubbish Bag(s)

Headtorch

Suncream

Basic Toiletries

Toilet Paper

Toilet Trowel 

Hand Sanitiser


CAMPING EQUIPMENT

If you plan to camp, you’ll need a tent, sleeping mat, and sleeping bag. We always like to have a pillow and sleeping liner too. You’ll also need a small burner, gas canister and cooking supplies if you want a hot meal.

ELECTRONICS

A power bank is always a good idea for charging your phone, camera batteries, etc. However, you’re never far from an electricity supply when trekking from Mestia to Ushguli. Just remember to pack an adapter for charging at guesthouses.

MESTIA TO USHGULI GUESTHOUSES

The main villages offering guesthouse accommodation along the Mestia to Ushguli trail are Chvabiani and Zhabeshi (Day 1), Adishi (Day 2), Khalde, Iprali, and Lalkhori (Day 3), and Ushguli (Day 4). They usually charge 50 – 75 GEL per person for dinner, bed & breakfast. It’s also possible to get a packed lunch (often referred to as a ‘lunch box’), or indeed no meals at all (but with nowhere else to eat along the trail, it makes sense to always include the meals in your stay).

Some places offer rooms with private bathrooms but most have shared facilities. Guesthouses provide bedding and towels. Some places will serve dinner and breakfast at one set time, especially if many guests are staying, while others will serve meals at a time you request.

It’s possible to book via booking.com for guesthouses in each of the villages, and if you’re hiking in July or August it’s a good idea to book accommodation in advance. If you prefer not to, there are usually guesthouses available which don’t have online booking, so you should be able to find a bed somewhere but you might have to hunt around a bit. It’s also possible to ask your guesthouse to call ahead and book your next guesthouse for you.

DAY 1 | CHVABIANI AND ZHABESHI ACCOMMODATION

There are a lot of guesthouses in the neighbouring villages of Chvabiani and Zhabeshi. We stayed at Maizer Qaldani Guesthouse in Chvabiani and highly recommend it. Maizer is very proud of his Svan heritage and happy to share Svan culture with you. You can go up his brother’s 900 year old tower and check out his family ‘museum’, an original tower house complete with hand-carved wooden barn, furnishings, and other items of ethnographic interest. The food is good and the family are very friendly. For more options in the area, check out booking.com.

Booking.com

DAY 2 | ADISHI ACCOMMODATION

Adishi feels more remote than any other overnight stop on the hike. The village is tucked away up a side valley, away from the main Mestia to Ushguli road. We wouldn’t particularly recommend the guesthouse that stayed at in Adishi, so if we returned we’d opt for Stone House Marexi or Elisabeth’s Guesthouse which both get good reviews and are reasonably priced. For more Adishi accommodation options check out booking.com.

Booking.com

DAY 3 | KHALDE, IPRALI AND LALKHORI ACCOMMODATION

Khalde is the first village you come to after crossing the Chkunderi Pass. Most of the houses are abandoned or partially destroyed, with just one guesthouse, Guesthouse Khalde, and the new Qaldea Resort offering accommodation. About 3 km further on is Iprali village, with a few more guesthouses including Betegi Guesthouse, Guesthouse Ucha (+995595557470), and Iprari Family Hotel (+995599250578). Lalkhori village is about 1.6 km further down the road and has three guesthouses, Sweet Home, Bezengi Guesthouse, and Guesthouse Robinzon Lalkhori.

Booking.com

DAY 4 | USHGULI ACCOMMODATION

There are many accommodation options in Ushguli, mainly spread across the middle and upper parts of the community. We had a great stay at Guesthouse Angelina (+995598153538) which is near Lamaria Church at the very top of the village (if you’ve seen Dede you might recognise the mum, Shorena, as the doctor from the film). Other places that come recommended include XII Century, Nizharadze’s Tower, Guesthouse Qaldea, and Caucasus Guesthouse. You can browse many more options on booking.com.

Booking.com

GETTING TO/FROM MESTIA/USHGULI

HOW TO GET TO MESTIA

Zugdidi is the main hub for public transport to Mestia. Marshrutkas leave from Zugdidi train station regularly from early morning until early afternoon (the last leaves around 1430). It takes 3 – 4 hours and costs 25 GEL. From Mestia to Zugdidi, marshrutkas depart from the main square at 8am, 12pm, and 2pm.

From Mestia to Zugdidi, marshrutkas depart from the main square at 8am, 12pm, and 2pm.

From Tbilisi, the best way to get to Zugdidi is by train. Search and book tickets via matarabeli.ge, tickets.railway.ge, or tkt.ge.

From Kutaisi, a direct marshrutka departs for Mestia from the bus station near McDonalds at 1000. Go early to secure a seat.

It’s also possible to fly from Kutaisi or Natakhtari (near Tbilisi) to Mestia with Vanilla Sky. Seats are very reasonably priced, however it’s a small plane and they book out far in advance, especially in peak summer season.

HOW TO LEAVE USHGULI

A taxi from Ushguli to Mestia costs 150+ GEL.

While a marshrutka does go between Ushguli and Mestia, the driver is unlikely to allow you on board. This is because Ushguli taxi drivers purportedly prevent tourists from using the marshrutkas in an effort to force them all to pay for taxis, and the marshrutka drivers don’t want trouble with the Ushguli locals.

Taking a marshrutka from Mestia to Ushguli is more straightforward. They depart in the morning from the main square in Mestia and cost 20 GEL per person.

It’s also possible to drive from Ushguli to Kutaisi via Zagari Pass and Lentekhi (163 km) with a 4×4 vehicle, assuming the road is clear of landslides. No public transport goes this way though, so you will need to hire a private car and driver for approx 400 GEL. Alternatively, you could arrange a vehicle to take you over Zagari Pass to Mele village (38 km), from where you can take the daily marshrutka to Kutaisi at around 6am. There is a guesthouse in Mele (+995599246499).

ADD-ON TREKS/HIKES

For an extended trek through Svaneti, start your hike further west in Chuberi. This way you can hike the entire completed section of the Transcaucasian Trail in the region, from Chuberi to Mestia and then from Mestia to Ushguli, over 8+ days.

A great option for connecting Upper and Lower Svaneti is the 1 – 2 day hike from Ushguli to Chvelpi, via Latpari Pass. From Chvelpi village a marshrutka goes directly to Kutaisi. The first half of the hike is very scenic and it makes a great alternative to going all the way back to Zugdidi by road.

MESTIA TO USHGULI TREKKING GUIDE

TRANSCAUCASIAN TRAIL
SVANETI | GEORGIA

That’s the lot for our Mestia to Ushguli trekking guide. If you have any useful info to add or stories to share, get in touch through the comments section below. Equally, if you have any questions, let us know and we’ll do our best to answer them. And if you’re planning your own trek, good luck and enjoy!

ORGANISE YOUR TRIP


Booking.com

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Mestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking GuideMestia to Ushguli: Svaneti Transcaucasian Trail Hiking Guide
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