• WHAT’S IN OUR CAMERA BAG?

    OUR COMPLETE TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR

    Del, wearing a Wandrd Prvke backpack filled with travel photography and videography gear, is controlling the drone on an overcast morning at the Quiraing on the Isle of Skye
  • OUR COMPLETE TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR

    Del, wearing the Wandrd Prvke backpack filled with travel photography and videography gear, is crouched down and preparing a drone for flight on an overcast morning at the Quiraing on the Isle of Skye

OUR COMPLETE TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR

WHAT’S IN OUR CAMERA BAG?

COMPLETE TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR

Whether you’re researching the best travel photography and videography gear for you, or just curious about the kit we use and why, here’s the complete rundown of what’s in our camera bags.

*Some of the links in this post are affiliate links – if you purchase a product or service via these links, we may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps offset the cost of running this blog and keeps us travelling so that we can continue to produce great content for you. We greatly appreciate your support!*

CAMERA BAGS

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

CAMERA BAGS

First up, the actual camera bags we use. We’re so in love with the Wandrd Prvke 31 that we’ve dedicated an entire post to its glorification. But if you can’t be bothered reading it, just know that it’s a super-sexy, hard-wearing, multi-tasking travel photography bag that we highly recommend and have been using for years. We have an older model in Black, plus the updated All New Prvke in Aegean Blue, both with ‘Photography Bundle’ inclusions (Essential Plus camera cubes, waist straps, and accessory straps).

  • Del hiking through a sunny, rocky landscape in Oman wearing a Wandrd Prvke backpack filled with travel photography and videography gear
  • Del is hiking through a sunny, rocky landscape in Oman wearing the Wandrd Prvke backpack filled with travel photography and videography gear

CAMERAS + LENSES

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

CAMERAS + LENSES

We were devout Canon disciples for years, but when the time came to up our game from crop sensor DSLR (700D) to something more professional, we switched to the school of Sony. It was a decision made after months of research, poring over reviews and hypothesising about many obscure travel photography situations. Investing in a full frame Sony mirrorless camera plus associated lenses is, well, just that. An investment. A very serious investment. But since taking the plunge and buying a Sony A7III at the start of 2019, we’ve been smitten, and since bought two A7IV camera bodies as well.

CAMERAS

Our main camera is a Sony A7IV. It’s a full frame mirrorless camera that does a great job of shooting both stills and video. After five years of heavy use and a couple of repairs, we felt our Sony A7III wasn’t performing as well as we wanted it to anymore, and decided to upgrade to the newer A7IV model in 2023. At that time, we also considered alternative options such as the A7RV and A7SIII, but besides the fact that they are both considerably more expensive, one specialises in photography and the other in video, with neither doing as good a job as the A7IV at both.

The functionality of the A7IV is greatly improved compared to the previous model, most notably the auto-focus features, vari-angle flipscreen, 10 bit colour with the ability to shoot good Log footage, and a larger 33 megapixel sensor. Other features that we already loved about the A7III continue to impress us, including its in-built stabilisation (with the addition of active mode) and its two SD card slots, allowing us to create an immediate backup, or have one for photos, one for video. Being able to create proxy files in-camera for our video clips is a huge time-saver when it comes to 4K video editing, yet another feature we love about this camera.

The Sony A7IV, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


In certain scenarios, for example when documenting a multi-day hike, one really good hybrid camera like the Sony A7IV, or our older Sony A7III, has been ideal for us. But there have been other situations when having only one camera has felt limiting, for example when documenting our sailing adventure on tall ship Bessie Ellen. So, we decided to buy a second camera body in 2024 to enable us to shoot quality video simultaneously. A second camera also gives us a back-up should one fail in the midst of a project. This has become a more important consideration for us in the last year or so, as we have started collaborating more with companies and need to know we can follow through on the work promised. 

Again, we considered other Sony models, but decided on a second A7IV because this suits our needs best, and we wanted to make sure whatever footage we ended up with from the two different cameras would match at the video editing stage. Our older A7III now takes a backseat, but it’s handy to keep around in case we want a third camera for shooting photos.

LENSES

We have three Sony lenses, generally considered to be the ‘holy trinity’ for travel photographers as they cover focal lengths from 16mm – 200mm, which accounts for most situations. 

24-70 mm F2.8 Lens

The Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens is a great all-rounder and our most used lens. The focal range covers a wide variety of situations, and the f/2.8 aperture allows us to shoot in low light and achieve lovely bokeh (a fancy term for dreamy background blur). We pondered the 24-105mm f/4 because that extra 35mm of focal length would be great, but in the end we knew we’d regret not having a wider aperture for video and photos. As our main lens, we also wanted the best quality, and that came down to the GM series. 

The Sony FE24-70mm F2.8 GM lens, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


There is now an updated and improved version of this lens, the 24-70 mm F2.8 GM II, which is lighter and smaller than the original model that we have. If you’re putting together your Sony kit from scratch, this newer model is worth considering, although it is more expensive.

A wet boot steaming next to the fire in a Scottish bothy

The f/2.8 aperture on the Sony 24-70 mm GM lens allows us to shoot in lowlight and capture images with shallow depth of field like this



A wet boot steaming next to the fire in a Scottish bothy

The f/2.8 aperture on the Sony 24-70 mm GM
lens allows us to shoot in lowlight and capture
images with shallow depth of field like this



16-35 mm F2.8 Lens

While 24 mm is still pretty wide, we were used to having a 10 – 18 mm Canon lens and knew we’d miss having the extra wide-angle capability that the Sony FE 16-35 mm F2.8 GM lens could give us. 

The Sony FE 16-35 mm F2.8 GM lens, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


We use it a lot for landscape photography, but it’s also great for getting a wider angle in tight spaces like building interiors or narrow street scenes. Again, the wide aperture gives us a lot more versatility for shooting in low light and achieving a shallower depth of field for photos and video.

There is also a new and improved version of this lens, the Sony FE 16-35 mm F2.8 GM II, which is lighter and smaller than the original model that we own.

A wide view of a mall black rocky bay with clear aquamarine water at the Hangdam Coastal Walkway on the Jeju Olle Trail

Getting that wide landscape shot at 16 mm on South Korea’s Jeju Island



A wide view of a mall black rocky bay with clear aquamarine water at the Hangdam Coastal Walkway on the Jeju Olle Trail

Getting that wide landscape shot at
16 mm on South Korea’s Jeju Island



70-200 mm F4 Lens

After travelling with just the 16-35mm and 24-70mm lenses for a few months, Del was really missing having a longer focal length. So, we dropped another small fortune on the Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS lens. The most obvious use for this telephoto lens is capturing subjects that are far away. Shooting wildlife is a good example. But it’s also great for portrait photography, as standing further away from your subject while using a longer focal length creates the impression of greater separation of the foreground and background, creating a nice depth of field. When shooting video, it’s great for capturing intimate footage of people or animals from an inconspicuous distance, with the subject behaving in a more natural way, often completely unaware of the camera.   

The Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS lens, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


Again, there is an updated version of this lens, the FE 70-200 mm F4 Macro G OSS II, which is lighter, smaller, and includes macro capabilities.

The last light of the day illuminates the snow streaming off Lhotse (8516 m) in Nepal

Capturing the last light of the day on Lhotse (8516 m) while trekking the Everest Three Passes in Nepal, using the Sony FE 70-200 mm F4 G lens



The last light of the day illuminates the snow streaming off Lhotse (8516 m) in Nepal

Capturing the day’s last light on Lhotse (8516 m)
while trekking the Everest Three Passes in Nepal,
using the Sony FE 70-200 mm F4 G lens



BATTERIES

Only one battery came with each of our cameras, so we’ve had to buy lots of extra batteries. The official Sony ones are very expensive, so we use third-party batteries instead, from Ravpower and Neewer. We have 9 batteries in total, which may seem excessive, but we often go off-grid for days on end and need enough batteries to see us through. In these situations, we only have a small solar panel and a couple of power banks to keep everything charged, so the more batteries the better! We also find that we need to swap out batteries a few times a day if we’re shooting lots of 4K footage, so having plenty of fully-charged spares to serve two cameras is a must.

The Sony NP-FZ100 battery, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


MEMORY CARDS

Our cameras have two SD slots, which is a great feature that enables us to record to both simultaneously, meaning we either have an immediate backup or can set one card to record video and the other photos. We usually record to both simultaneously, then review and delete unwanted photos/clips in camera from card 1. After this we remove card 1 and back up the files to two external hard drives, only then deleting files off both cards 1 and 2.

We use SanDisk Extreme Pro SD cards. We have 7 x 256 GB cards (a mix of 170 mb/s and 200 mb/s), which we use in the Sony A7IV cameras, plus another 2 x 128 GB 170 mb/s cards which are used in the older A7III camera and as reserves in case we need spares.

The SanDisk Extreme Pro 256GB SD card, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


FILTERS

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

FILTERS

We have a number of camera filters that have various functions. Some are essential for shooting video, others allow us to get a bit more creative with our photography, and some are purely to protect our expensive glass. 

ESSENTIAL FILTERS

The filters below are an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear, and we use them day-in-day-out.

Protective Filters

We have a protective filter for each lens (2 x Hoya 82mm Pro-1 Digital Protector and 1 x Hoya 72mm Pro-1 Digital Protector). When we’re not using any of the other filters outlined below, we screw these on the front of the lens to protect against scratches and so on.


Variable ND Filter

For shooting video, a variable ND filter is essential. As we mostly film with a shutter speed of 1/50 (see this post if you want to learn why), it can be tricky to get the correct exposure in bright conditions. For example, in order to get the right exposure in broad daylight we would have to shoot at the narrowest possible aperture (f/22). But we want to shoot at wider apertures (say f/5.6 – f/8) to create different shots and achieve the best quality. This is where a variable ND filter comes in. It cuts the amount of light entering the camera, a simple process of turning the filter to increase or decrease the strength of the ‘sunglasses’ until the exposure is right.

The NiSi True Color ND-Vario 1 – 5 stop 82 mm filter, an essential part of our travel photography and videography gear


We have 2 x NiSi True Color ND-Vario 1 – 5 stop 82 mm filters, one for each of our A7IV cameras. Our 70 – 200 mm lens has a 72 mm thread, so we also have a step-up ring in order to use the ND filter with this lens. Compared to other VND filters we have used in the past, the NiSi True Color filter is indeed more true to life in its colour and has no noticeable colour cast.

UV IR-Cut Filter

In addition to the above VND filter, we use a NiSi UV IR-Cut Filter to cut UV and IR rays. The Sony A7IV does not have an IR filter on the sensor, so without this filter, footage shot using an ND filter would have a magenta colour cast that would be very tedious and time consuming to correct at the editing stage.


These NiSi filters use the Swift System, allowing us to quickly and safely stack the two filters on top of each other without the need to screw either on.

ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FILTERS

We have a few additional photography filters which we’ve owned for many years. To be honest, we haven’t used them in a while, but for the sake of completeness we’ll include them in this rundown of our travel photography gear. 

Filter Holder & Polariser

We have a few NiSi 100x100mm glass filters, and these require a special filter holder which attaches to the front of the lens. We have the V5 Pro 100mm Filter Kit Holder, which includes a circular polarising filter (CPL). This is ideal for cutting out glare when photographing bright sand or water, reducing reflections, deepening the blue of the sky, increasing contrast, or adding saturation. We can use the CPL on its own, or in conjunction with the glass filters, which slot into the holder in front of the CPL. The V7 is the current model, and you can get various kits including the filter holder, CPL, and an assortment of ND filters, such as the V7 Starter Kit.


NiSi 10 Stop ND Filter 

When we want to shoot a long exposure photo in daylight we use a NiSi 10 stop ND 100x100mm filter, in conjunction with the filter holder mentioned above. Basically, this is a very dark piece of glass that cuts the amount of light entering the camera by, umm, 10 stops. We use it to turn water silky smooth, to make clouds stretch across the sky, or to completely eradicate any sign of humans from a busy scene.


Sunrise behind Seongsan Ilchulbong, a massive tuff cone on Jeju Island, South Korea

Getting smooth and shiny water by shooting a long exposure with the 10 stop filter, as the sun rises over iconic Seongsan Ilchulbong on Jeju Island



Sunrise behind Seongsan Ilchulbong, a massive tuff cone on Jeju Island, South Korea

Getting smooth and shiny water by shooting a
long exposure with the 10 stop filter, as the sun
rises over Seongsan Ilchulbong on Jeju Island



NiSi 4 Stop GND Filters

We also have a NiSi medium graduated ND16 filter and a NiSi reverse graduated ND16 filter. These are useful when the sky (medium graduated) or horizon (reverse graduated) is much brighter than the rest of the image. 

NiSi GND 100x150mm ND4 (0.6) 2 Stop Medium



The medium GND filter can be used to reduce the exposure in the top half of the image by 4 stops, allowing the photo to be properly exposed across the whole image. This is useful in situations where the sky is drastically brighter than the rest of the landscape. The reverse 4 stop GND filter is specifically for shooting sunrise or sunset, as the glass is at its darkest along the horizon line, getting gradually lighter towards the top. 

The peak of Mt. Manaslu shining in the sun on a clear morning, with prayer flags in the foreground

To reduce the exposure of the brighter mountain and sky, we used the medium GND filter for this image on the Manaslu Circuit Trek



The peak of Mt. Manaslu shining in the sun on a clear morning, with prayer flags in the foreground

To reduce the exposure of the brighter mountain
and sky, we used the medium graduated ND16
filter for this image on the Manaslu Circuit Trek



MICROPHONES

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

MICROPHONES

The in-camera audio from the Sony A7IV camera isn’t good enough for us to use in our films, so we use external shotgun microphones to capture high quality audio alongside our footage. We also have an audio recorder, which we originally bought as a temporary fix for a broken audio jack but which has proven useful in other ways, and a dynamic microphone used specifically for recording voiceovers. 

SHOTGUN MICROPHONES

We have two shotgun microphones, one for each of our A7IV cameras. Both are connected via the hot shoe mounts and record audio in sync with the footage. 

We’ve been using our Rode VideoMic Pro since 2018, combined with a wind muff or ‘DeadCat’ in windy conditions. We are very happy with the audio quality we get from this microphone, and it has lasted us well, especially given the tough conditions we’ve put it through, battling dust, wind, rain, snow, sand, dirt, heat, and cold on our multi-day hikes and off-road adventures. It has required a couple of repairs along the road, both relating to the wired connection, but these repairs have done the trick and the microphone continues to function well to this day.



That said, we decided to buy the Sony ECM B-10 shotgun mic and wind muff for use with our second camera, instead of another VideoMic Pro, due to a few perceived advantages. Firstly, all of our problems with the Rode VideoMic Pro have been to do with the fact that it is wired (eg. a loose audio plug connection causing us to lose one recording channel and eventually both, and a failed audio jack in our Sony A7III camera rendering our wired microphone useless until we could get the camera repaired). The Sony ECM B-10 is not wired, instead it connects digitally via the camera’s hot shoe. 


Another benefit of a digital connection is that the mic is powered by the camera, so we don’t need to carry around a spare 9V battery, and the microphone automatically starts recording audio when you hit the record button on the camera. We’ve lost count of the number of times we’ve forgotten to turn the Rode microphone on and recorded video with no audio. It’s especially easy to forget when using the wind muff (which is basically all the time) because it covers the on switch. So, having a mic that auto-records is a big bonus. The Sony ECM B-10 is also smaller than our Rode mic, so our overall camera set up is more compact and neat.  

Del shooting video in a harbour on a cloudy day, recording sound using the attached Sony ECM B-10 microphone, an important component of our travel photography and videography gear

The low profile digital Sony ECM B-10 mic onboard the A7IV with 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens and NiSi True Color ND-Vario filter attached



Del shooting video through the window of a helicopter in Nepal, recording sound using the attached Rode VideoMic Pro, an important component of our travel photography and videography gear

The rather larger wired Rode VideoMic Pro onboard the Sony A7III with 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens and old Nisi ND-Vario filter attached



Del shooting video in a harbour on a cloudy day, recording sound using the attached Sony ECM B-10 microphone, an important component of our travel photography and videography gear

The low profile digital Sony ECM B-10 mic on
the A7IV with 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens and
NiSi True Color ND-Vario filter attached


Del shooting video through the window of a helicopter in Nepal, recording sound using the attached Rode VideoMic Pro, an important component of our travel photography and videography gear

The rather larger wired Rode VideoMic Pro on
the Sony A7III with 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens
and old Nisi ND-Vario filter attached



ZOOM H5 HANDY RECORDER

A few days into a month-long camping road trip in Oman in early 2022, the audio jack on our Sony A7III camera packed in, rendering our Rode VideoMic Pro useless and meaning we had no way of recording audio besides the in-camera audio. The quality is so bad, especially when recording outdoors in near constant breezy conditions, so this wasn’t an option for us and we had to figure out a way of recording decent audio for the remainder of our trip. This led us to the Zoom H5 Handy Recorder, the only option available to us in a photography shop in Muscat. 

The H5 is able to record audio itself via the onboard stereo microphone capsule (a wind muff add-on is available), or you can connect external microphones to it (including the Rode VideoMic Pro) for better audio quality. Audio files can be recorded in WAV to an SD card, and then synced with video footage in editing software such as Premiere Pro. It was a tedious and cumbersome videography set-up for the remainder of our Oman trip, and we had thousands of clips to sync during the editing stage, but it worked. 


A Zoom H5 Handy Recorder (a versatile piece of travel photography and videography gear) and Sony A7iii on a tripod in Oman

One of our makeshift configurations in Oman: the Zoom H5 attached to the Joby Gorillapod and wrapped around the Peak Design Travel Tripod while connected to the Rode VideoMic Pro secured in the hotshoe of the Sony A7III with the faulty audio jack



A Zoom H5 Handy Recorder (a versatile piece of travel photography and videography gear) and Sony A7iii on a tripod in Oman

One of our makeshift configurations in Oman: the
Zoom H5 attached to the Joby Gorillapod while
wrapped around the Peak Design Travel Tripod
and connected to the Rode VideoMic Pro secured
in the hotshoe of the A7III with faulty audio jack



When we returned to Scotland, we got the camera audio jack repaired and the Zoom H5 was forgotten about. UNTIL, a couple of years later when we wanted to capture some lengthy audio recordings, and we started researching dynamic microphones for recording voiceovers. We realised the H5 connected to our Rode VideoMic Pro would be perfect for those 30 – 60 minute audio recordings, and that we could connect a dynamic microphone to our H5 via an XLR cable to record that audio too. 

And so, we’ve now come to view this emergency purchase (that seemed destined to live in the bottom of a drawer) as a versatile and useful bit of kit in our filmmaking arsenal. 

SHURE SM57 DYNAMIC MICROPHONE

As our filmmaking style evolved and we found we wanted to use voiceovers in some of our videos, we realised our shotgun microphones couldn’t produce the sound we wanted, especially in the non-studio/untreated room environments we had available to us. This led us to the Shure SM57, a dynamic microphone that does a great job of picking up audio directly in front of it, while isolating any other sounds coming from the sides or behind. We use it in conjunction with the Shure A2WS foam windscreen or the heftier Shure A81WS to eliminate plosives and unwanted ‘mouth noise’. 




Using the clip that comes with the microphone and a thread adapter, we mount the microphone to the compact Rode Tripod 2 for hands-free dialogue recording, with the mic connected via an XLR cable to the Zoom H5.

WIRED HEADPHONES

We have a couple of pairs of wired headphones for monitoring audio while filming. With the headphones in we can quickly pinpoint the best angle to avoid unwanted wind noise, pick up on any distracting sounds (like someone rustling a tissue in their pocket while speaking to the camera), and just generally monitor the audio levels and exactly what is and isn’t being recorded. These plug into the Sony A7IV and the Zoom H5 via a standard 3.5 mm jack.


TRIPODS

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

TRIPODS

Finding a great travel tripod can be a right pain. You need to weigh up so many factors, and just when you think you’re onto a winner, there’s always one that lets you down. If it’s small and compact, it’s also annoyingly short. If it’s lightweight, it’s flimsy and useless in the slightest breeze. If it’s cheap, it’s bulky, heavy, and/or flimsy. If it’s lightweight, compact, sturdy, and extends to a reasonable height, it’s also very expensive. Basically, you’re screwed either way and have to give in to something. 

After a long hunt, we’re glad to say we’ve found our full size travel tripod partner for life. And for some of our smaller bits of kit like microphones, a couple of versatile mini tripods are a great addition.   

PEAK DESIGN TRAVEL TRIPOD

“Mmm, mmm. That is one impressive looking tripod,” we thought to ourselves upon being Insta-spammed with ads. They knew their target market well. After detailed investigation, we’d backed the 2019 Kickstarter campaign for the Peak Design Travel Tripod and took delivery six months later. We were grinning like teenagers in love. Or me when I see pizza.

A person standing on a long wooden veranda uses the phone mount on a fully extended Peak Design Travel Tripod, an essential piece of travel photography gear

Using the nifty phone mount with our Peak Design Travel Tripod, legs fully extended



A person standing on a long wooden veranda uses the phone mount on a fully extended Peak Design Travel Tripod, an essential piece of travel photography gear

Using the nifty phone mount with our Peak
Design Travel Tripod
, legs fully extended



The design is revolutionary, leaving no negative space, which reduces the overall volume and makes it amazingly compact. Yet it is still what I’d consider full height (152.4 cm at max extension), and is incredibly lightweight at 1.29 kg for the carbon fibre version (1.56 kg for the aluminium alloy design). It deploys super fast and has a weight capacity of up to 9.1 kg, way more than we’ll ever need. It also comes with a slimline weatherproof carry case that slips into the side pocket of our camera bag or full-size backpacking bag with ease. The optional spike feet are an added bonus that we’ve come to depend on for extra purchase on steep terrain, or in windy conditions. 

Carbon Fiber Travel Tripod with the standard plate


Travel tripod using the spike feet


Our tripod goes everywhere with us, including hiking trips that may last a couple of days or a couple of months. We use it extensively when filming our ambient hiking films, with Del setting up the camera on the tripod to capture us as we walk to/from/by the lens, then running back to pick it up and pack it away again. It’s a lot of work, but the PD Travel Tripod’s ease of use and highly functional, compact, and lightweight design makes it possible. 

Put simply, it’s just the best travel tripod ever made. That comes at a price, but like I said, you have to give in to something. And should we ever have any problems, the guys at Peak Design offer a lifetime warranty on all their products. Nice. 

A Peak Design Travel Tripod, slung through the hip belt of a backpack, is a versatile piece of travel photography and videography gear

Ready for action in Nepal, the Peak Design Travel Tripod can be comfortably slung through even a lightweight hip belt



A man shooting video on St Kilda in Scotland, using a camera on top of a Peak Design Travel Tripod , a versatile piece of travel photography and videography gear

The Peak Design Travel Tripod on the remote Scottish islands of St Kilda, standing up to the strong breeze coming off the North Atlantic



A Peak Design Travel Tripod, slung through the hip belt of a backpack, is a versatile piece of travel photography and videography gear

Ready for action in Nepal, the Peak Design Travel
Tripod
can be comfortably slung through even a
lightweight backpack hip belt


A man shooting video on St Kilda in Scotland, using a camera on top of a Peak Design Travel Tripod , a versatile piece of travel photography and videography gear

The Peak Design Travel Tripod on the remote
Scottish islands of St Kilda, standing up to the
strong breeze coming off the North Atlantic



JOBY GORILLAPOD 3K

We’ve had this quirky little shapeshifter for many years and it gets pulled out every now and again for one use or another. In more recent years, it’s come in handy as a holder for our Zoom H5.


The flexible legs of the Gorillapod 3K can twist around railings, branches, or anything similar to gain extra height and shoot from unique angles. It’s also lightweight (less than 400g) and packs away easily in the side or front pockets of our backpacks. Not sure about that name though. It’s far too close to Jobby. And in Scotland that’s not a good thing.

Displaying two items of our travel photography gear, the Sony A7III camera is mounted on the Joby 3K Gorillapod, reflected in the mirror of an apartment along with the person holding it

Not just a tripod, the Joby Gorillapod 3K works perfectly for a spot of vlogging too



Displaying two items of our travel photography gear, the Sony A7III camera is mounted on the Joby 3K Gorillapod, reflected in the mirror of an apartment along with the person holding it

Not just a tripod, the Joby Gorillapod 3K
works perfectly for a spot of vlogging too



RODE TRIPOD 2

A newer addition to our travel photography and videography gear, the Rode Tripod 2 is a versatile mini ball head tripod that doubles up as a handheld grip and perfect mobile recording unit. We bought it primarily to use as a desktop mic stand for our Shure SM57, using the clip that comes with the microphone and a 3 / 8 to 5 / 8 thread adapter. But the beauty of this Rode Tripod 2 is that it also has an extra 6 x 1 / 4 threads on its legs, enabling us to attach the Zoom H5 to the ball head, and our Rode VideoMic Pro to a leg (using a 1 /4 to 3 / 8 thread adapter), turning it into a compact and streamlined audio recording unit. Previously, we had to use two separate tripods and/or mounting units (such as a camera) to hold each device, trying to place them close enough so that the microphone cable could stretch between them – it was a total faff.


TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

ESSENTIAL ACCESSORIES

Besides our cameras, lenses, and microphones, there are some other essential accessories that we use to help us capture the best photos and videos we can.

PEAK DESIGN CAPTURE CLIP

Genius. Absolute genius. This tiny metal contraption revolutionised the way we carry our cameras. The capture clip attaches to the strap of a backpack (or belt) and allows you to carry your camera hands free, safely and securely. You just snap the camera into place, and can unlock it quickly and easily any time you want to grab it to use. 


We do a lot of hiking, often with fully loaded 50 – 70L backpacks, and the capture clip has made photographing and videoing on the go so much easier. Del is usually the one carrying the camera in these situations. Having that 1.5 kg load securely attached to his strap, instead of dangling from his neck or using up one of his hands, is literally a weight off his shoulders, as well as a safer way to hike for both him and our gear. We love it.

A hiker with a big backpack walks past drying squid on the coast of Jeju Island. A large camera is attached to one of the straps using a Peak Design Capture Clip, an essential item of travel photography gear

The Sony A7III and 24-70 mm GM lens combo (approx. 1.5 kg), attached securely to Del’s backpack strap with the Peak Design Capture Clip



A hiker with a big backpack walks past drying squid on the coast of Jeju Island. A large camera is attached to one of the straps using a Peak Design Capture Clip, an essential item of travel photography gear

The Sony A7III and 24-70 mm GM lens combo
(approx. 1.5 kg), comfortably attached to Del’s
backpack strap with the Peak Design Capture Clip



We have two Peak Design Capture Clips, one for use with each of our A7IV cameras, and can attach them to the straps of our Wandrd Prvke camera bags or any of our Osprey hiking backpacks

WANDRD SLING STRAP

We’ve swapped the standard Sony straps that came with our cameras for the better functioning Wandrd Sling Strap. It’s a very comfortable strap to use and it’s super fast and easy to detach or re-attach the strap. This is particularly handy when using the camera in conjunction with the Capture Clip, when it’s easier to remove the strap so that it isn’t dangling in the way, or when we have the camera set up on the tripod for filming and we don’t want the strap flapping about and making noise. Then it’s quick and easy to put the strap back on whenever we are wandering around with just the cameras and want the security and hands-free functionality of a neck strap. 

WANDRD Sling Strap


One of the things we like about the Wandrd strap compared to the Peak Design Slide Lite Camera Strap (which we were also considering) is that the whole strap gets removed from the camera body, whereas the PD design includes anchor links which remain on the body and have the potential to flap about and make noise on our video recordings in windy conditions.

WHITE BALANCE CARD

Getting the white balance correct at the time of shooting video saves Del a whole lot of headaches when it comes to colour correcting our videos at the editing stage. But getting the WB correct is trickier than you might think, and the only way to really get it right is by using a colour calibrated WB card. We’ve tried cheap cards with poor results,  so ultimately ended up splashing out on the Calibrate ColorChecker Passport Video. When shooting video on our Sony cameras and on the drone, we hold up the WB checker in front of the lens and set a custom WB based on the readings from the Calibrate WB target. This means our footage is shot with accurate WB every time, which is the necessary starting point for colour correcting and grading in post. If we ever forget to set the accurate WB before shooting, then holding up the WB target in the frame at the end of the clip allows Del to accurately set the WB in post instead, using the eye dropper tool on the WB target.


The Passport is small enough and durable enough to fit in Del’s pocket, ready to whip out anywhere and everywhere from a hiking trail to a tall ship under sail. We’ve been using it since 2021, and over time Del has learnt to guesstimate the correct WB pretty accurately based on his consistent usage of the Calibrate WB target. That, combined with the far superior Auto WB settings in the A7IV compared to our older A7III, along with the ability to lock the AWB, means that we use the WB Passport less and less in fast-paced shooting scenarios. But we still refer to it every time we fly the drone, and in less time-sensitive shooting situations with the A7IV cameras.

NEOPRENE CAMERA COVER

Among the many camera carry solutions we’ve trialled over the years, our simple neoprene camera cover is one which we continue to stuff in the backpack for a bit of on-the-go protection. It’s handy for covering the camera during a quick rain shower, and protects it from bumps and scratches if we’re jumping in and out of vehicles, scrambling up rocks on a hike, or such like. We often grab it if we’re just popping out to take a few shots and want something to protect the camera should the weather change suddenly.


THINK TANK EMERGENCY RAIN COVER

The Think Tank Emergency Rain Cover  has been a great addition to our travel photography and videography gear in recent times, shooting a lot in rainy Scotland! We have a medium sized one, which is big enough to cover the camera with its longest lens. Its design keeps the camera dry, while still allowing easy viewing and access to the controls and LCD screen at the back. It attaches securely to the camera via the hot shoe mount, and we can use it in combination with our Capture Clip for protection from rain, or other nasties like dust, on-the-go. 


CLEANING KIT AND LENS CLOTHS

For rain spots on a lens, chamois cloths do an amazing job at cleaning it up, absorbing the water instantly and leaving the lens streak free. We buy a big cloth and cut it up into smaller pieces to keep in various places on our persons and in our bags. We also have a small cleaning kit with a blower and brush, and a couple of pocket lens cloths that we attach to our belt loops so we can’t lose them! 




WANDRD TECH BAG AND POUCHES

We have an assortment of cables that we want to keep safe and all together in one place, and some small see-through mesh pouches are perfect for this task. For other loose items like spare batteries and SD cards that we want to carry around with us if we’re out shooting all day, our large Wandrd Tech Bag with an added carry strap is ideal. It’s made from water-resistant material and zippers, and has two separate compartments. The front one is fleece-lined, perfect for stashing a phone or other delicate items, and the large main compartment includes five webbed storage pockets, perfect for batteries and other small items. We have it in Black, but I would LOVE one in the new Sedona Orange or Dallol Yellow.


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DRONE AND ACCESSORIES

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

DRONE + ACCESSORIES

DJI AIR 2S (FLY MORE COMBO)

We upgraded from a DJI Mavic Air to a DJI Air 2S in 2022. It’s small and lightweight enough to carry with us on backpacking and hiking trips (unlike some other DJI models like those in the Mavic series) and produces excellent footage and good quality 20 megapixel photos. For us it’s a great compromise between portability and functionality. 


We bought the ‘Fly More Combo’ which includes two extra batteries, an ND filter set, charging hub, and a carry bag. In addition to this we bought an extra battery and a stronger ND filter set. This gives us four batteries in total, which is particularly handy when we are on multi-day hikes with no charging capability. The additional set of filters gives us a choice of 8 in total, covering a range of ND 4 – ND 512. Just like the VND filters for our Sony cameras, these ND filters are essential if we’re shooting in bright conditions in order to keep our shutter speed at 1/50. Sometimes it’s a bit of trial and error to figure out which filter is the right strength for the conditions, with Del putting one filter on, flying up to test it out, and having to bring the drone back down to change to a lighter or darker filter. We’ve only ever used the ND 64 filter from the extra set that we bought, but it gets used a lot, so it was definitely worth purchasing.



We mostly shoot video with the drone, but the quality of photos is great too, and a huge improvement on the quality from our older Mavic Air drone (which has just a 12 megapixel camera). Although it’s easy to switch between video and photo functions on the drone, the ND filter which is essential (in most conditions) for shooting video makes it too dark for capturing photos at the correct shutter speed. So, more often than not Del has to bring the drone down, remove the ND filter, then fly it back up again specifically to capture photos. If we have time and power to charge batteries, this is no problem, but there are plenty of situations where this is too inconvenient and we choose to shoot video instead of photos.

We still have our old Mavic Air Fly More Combo drone, a set of PolarPro Vivid Filters and a set of 6 NiSi ND filters for the Mavic Air as a backup should anything happen to our Air 2S, but we haven’t used it since 2022.

Del launching the DJI Air 2S (a key component of our travel and videography gear) from a traditional wooden sailboat in the Scottish Hebrides

Launching the DJI Air 2S from a traditional wooden sailing ship in the Scottish Hebrides, grab handle attached but hidden from view



Del controlling the DJI Air2S using the controller with lanyard attached (a key component of our travel and videography gear)

Using the Air 2S remote controller with a handy lanyard, great for those times when you need to launch and catch the drone by hand



Del launching the DJI Air 2S (a key component of our travel and videography gear) from a traditional wooden sailboat in the Scottish Hebrides

Launching the DJI Air 2S from a traditional wooden
sailing ship
in the Scottish Hebrides, grab handle
attached but hidden from view


Del controlling the DJI Air2S using the controller with lanyard attached (a key component of our travel and videography gear)

Using the Air 2S remote controller with a handy
lanyard, great for those times when you need to
launch and catch the drone by hand



DRONE ACCESSORIES

When we’re on camping road trips an essential bit of kit is a power inverter, enabling us to charge our drone batteries from the car. Having had plenty of practice, Del now takes off in the air from his hand, and also catches the drone in his hand, instead of taking off and landing on the ground. This kind of landing manoeuvre is tricky if we’re moving though, for example on a sailboat. In these situations, our grab handle makes taking off and landing much easier. A clip-on lanyard for the drone controller is another great accessory, enabling Del to quickly free-up both hands while the controller dangles around his neck. Lastly, a monitor hood is very handy in bright conditions, reducing glare and enabling you to actually see what’s on the phone screen.





LAPTOPS, EXTERNAL STORAGE DRIVES AND ACCESSORIES

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

LAPTOPS, STORAGE DRIVES + ACCESSORIES

Dell XPS 13 laptops ( x 3 )
Hard Shell Laptop Cases ( x 2 )
SanDisk SSD ( x 3 )
SSD Carry Cases ( x 3 )
Seagate HDD  ( x 4 )
HDD Carry Cases ( x 4 )
Dell Universal Dock
Rechargeable Bluetooth Mouse ( x 2 )
Various Older Hard Drives
iDrive Cloud Subscriptions

Our laptops and external storage drives are an essential part of our travel photography and videography kit. Without them (and our editing software and filmmaking essentials outlined below) there would be no final photos or films! 

DELL XPS 13 LAPTOPS

We’ve been using Dell laptops for many years, and find the XPS 13 to be an ideal size for travelling all over the world with. We travel with a laptop each (our two most recent models dating from 2023 and 2019), and when possible we also travel with a third laptop, our oldest one from 2017. 


The newest model is our fastest and most capable laptop, so this is our primary video editing laptop. Our 2019 model is our primary photo editing laptop. Our 2017 model is really too old and slow for even photo editing, but still functions as a general laptop and works great as a second screen for video editing, via a wireless connection. 

A person working on their laptop at a shaded picnic bench while their tent sits in the sun in front

On longer hiking trips, like our month long walk around Jeju Island, we carried a laptop with us to back up our footage



A person working on their laptop at a shaded picnic bench while their tent sits in the sun in front

On longer hiking trips, like our month long walk
around Jeju Island, we carried a laptop with
us to back up all of our footage. Fortunately they
are light and slim enough to fit in the backpack.



We have a protective hard case for each of our newer laptops, and these slip into the dedicated laptop section in the back of our Wandrd Prvke camera bags. If we’re carrying the third laptop with us too, we have an old Scrubba Air Sleeve we can use.

RECHARGEABLE WIRELESS ERGONOMIC MOUSE

Since a friend gave me her old wireless mouse to try, I’ll never be able to edit videos using the laptop trackpad again. A mouse makes it SO much easier and faster, and it’s a lot more comfortable to use as my whole body posture is more open, instead of hunched over the keyboard. After some initial hesitation from Del (he’s a creature of habit), he’s a mouse convert too now.


We like the comfort and functionality of ergonomic designs (although they are bulkier than a standard small mouse), and a rechargeable model is a must, forgoing the need for spare batteries. 

EXTERNAL STORAGE DRIVES

We need a LOT of storage space for backing up our media, and backing up that back up, and sometimes backing up that back up. And so on. We shoot everything in RAW and 4K, and can easily rack up hundreds of GBs of photos and footage during a week-long trip. We have multiple Seagate One Touch 5TB HDD external storage drives (and a myriad of other old hard drives) for backing up ongoing projects, and storing old projects. And as our content never gets deleted, we usually need to buy a couple of new hard drives every year. We also have a couple of iDrive subscriptions for backing up to the cloud.



For ongoing video editing projects, we use a SanDisk SSD. A solid state drive is faster, smaller, and less prone to corruption and/or randomly disconnecting itself with the slight graze of a cable. SSDs are also considerably more expensive than HDDs (which is why we don’t store all of our media on them), but in our opinion they are worth the extra expense for the sake of a faster and easier video editing process.    

Our standard process is to backup our media in three places; iDrive plus two separate external storage drives. When we’ve finished working on a video project, we’ll transfer it from an SSD to an HDD, ready for a new video project to be added to the SSD. 

HDD AND SSD CARRY CASES

We have a protective case for each of our external storage drives. The best we’ve found for our HDDs are Case Logic, and for our SSDs we like these Lacdo cases



DELL UNIVERSAL DOCKING HUB

We need lots of ports for our numerous storage drives, laptop charging cable, HDMI cable for connecting to a monitor when available, SD cards, etc. Our newest laptop only has two USB C ports (one of which is needed for the charging cable!), so we’ve added a Dell Universal Dock to our setup, enabling us to plug in multiple drives and cables at once. The transfer speed between drives is much faster than we’ve experienced without it, and the docking hub is proving useful (if annoyingly large and heavy for travelling with).


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EDITING SOFTWARE + FILMMAKING ESSENTIALS

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

EDITING SOFTWARE + FILMMAKING ESSENTIALS

Our travel photography and videography gear isn’t just about the physical hardware; our editing software is also a vital part of our kit, along with a few other essentials such as a royalty-free music subscription and colour correction/grading LUTs.

ADOBE CREATIVE CLOUD SUBSCRIPTION

(LIGHTROOM, PHOTOSHOP, PREMIERE PRO +)

We have an Adobe Creative Cloud All Apps plan, which we renew annually. Out of all the apps, we mostly use Lightroom, Photoshop and Premiere Pro, but price wise it makes sense just to pay for the full Creative Cloud subscription instead of paying for the three apps individually.

Lightroom is our main photo editing software, but we use Photoshop regularly too. They definitely require a bit of time to figure out, but it’s well worth the effort and there are plenty of online tutorials out there. A must have for any photographer!

We edit videos in Premiere Pro. Again, you need to invest time and energy into learning how to use it, but fortunately Premiere Pro is so widely used that there are plenty of online tutorials out there to get you started, along with help forums if you get stuck or have any problems. 

Adobe makes regular updates to their apps, and new features appear every year, enabling you to work faster and smarter. 

ARE YOU SUBSCRIBED TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL?

COLOUR CORRECTION AND GRADING LUTs

We use two different LUTs for colour correcting our footage to the standard Rec709 colour gamut, and grading it for a more artistic look. 

For colour correction we use Leeming LUTs, which is a process that starts in camera, and ends with a plugin in Premiere Pro. After buying the LUT downloads for our Sony cameras and DJI Air 2S, we set up each camera as per the instructions. This includes filming in S-Log3 on our A7IVcameras, Cine-2 on our A7III, and D-Log on our Air 2S. We make sure the WB is correct before hitting record, and expose to the right using ETTR principles. The Zebra Pattern function on each of our cameras helps us to get the ETTR exposure right. When we import the footage into Premiere Pro, we add the Leeming LUT to each clip, and this colour corrects it to perfect Rec709 colorimetry. We paid a one-off fee for the Leeming LUTs and are emailed downloads for any updated versions of LUTs for our specific cameras.

The Leeming LUTs ensure our footage is perfectly colour corrected, which is a good base for further colour grading. We use FilmConvert Nitrate LUTs for grading in Premiere Pro. FilmConvert Nitrate has numerous LUTs emulating film stocks and grain structures. You can choose the intensity of the LUT and grain, and adjust other aspects such as luminosity too. We’ve played about with a number of different stocks and settings over the last few years, and settled (for now!) on a mix of two different film stocks, using the chroma (colour) of one and the luma (light and shadow) of another to achieve a look that we like. Our one-time purchase includes regular software updates.

EPIDEMIC SOUND ROYALTY-FREE MUSIC SUBSCRIPTION

After many years scouring the internet for decent and free royalty-free music to use in our videos, we finally gave up and bought a subscription to Artlist, which we used for a year, before switching to Epidemic Sound.

We found some great music on Artlist, but overall we prefer Epidemic Sound. The main reason is that ES allows you to download individual stems of songs, for example just the melody, drums, or instruments. This is a feature we use the majority of the time, especially to find minimal music for our ambient hiking films. Sometimes we’ll layer a couple of stems to create a track we like, removing the drums or some vocals which we didn’t like in the full mix. It’s also great for creating a leitmotif in a film, using similar but not identical tracks, for example the melody stem and the instruments stem of the same song. 

Epidemic Sound screenshot to accompany relevant text in Travel Photography and Videography Gear post

Searching for music on Epidemic Sound



Epidemic Sound screenshot to accompany relevant text in Travel Photography and Videography Gear post

Searching for music on Epidemic Sound



Other great features include the ability to search for similar tracks, save your favourites in folders with optional notes, and filter searches by mood, genre, BPM, duration, and more. 

We pay an annual subscription fee for an Epidemic Sound Personal Plan. You can get a free trial to try out ES for yourself, and if you click through via our referral link and subsequently sign up for an annual subscription, we’ll get some credit towards our own annual fee – thanks for your support!

GEAR INSURANCE

TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR //

INSURANCE

AADUKI MULTIMEDIA INSURANCE

With so much expensive travel photography and videography gear, we need extra insurance above and beyond our general travel insurance policy to cover our kit. We have an annual policy with Aaduki Multimedia Insurance, including worldwide cover for up to 90 days per trip outside of the UK. For now, this suits our needs, and if in the future we plan to be away from the UK for more than 90 days at a time, we’ll need to reassess our insurance options. 

DJI CARE REFRESH

We opted for the 2 year DJI Care Refresh package when buying our Air 2S, with the option of renewing this for a further 1 year. This covers up to 4 replacement drones (2 on the 1 year policy) for a drastically reduced price compared to buying a brand new one.  Given how expensive they are, we felt it was worth taking out this cover. 

THANKS FOR READING!

If you’ve found this guide helpful, please consider leaving us a small tip.
Your support is greatly appreciated and helps cover the costs of running this blog.

Cheers!

Kim and Del Hogg

THANKS FOR READING!

If you’ve found this guide helpful, please consider leaving us
a small tip.

Your support is greatly appreciated and helps cover the costs of running this blog.

Cheers!

Kim and Del Hogg


OUR COMPLETE TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR

OUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GEAR

We hope you’ve enjoyed seeing what’s inside our camera bag and that you’ve found it useful. What does your travel photography and/or videography setup look like? Share your favourite gear in the comments below!

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Del, wearing the Wandrd Prvke backpack filled with travel photography and videography gear, is controlling a drone on an overcast morning at the Quiraing on the Isle of Skye
A woman hiking with backpack and poles in front of a glacier wall
Backpacking Camping Gear Featured Image
A person stands in front of a waterfall wearing the all-new Wandrd Prvke 31