• HIKING FROM USHGULI TO CHVELPI

    VIA LATPARI PASS

    A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike
  • USHGULI TO CHVELPI

    A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

HIKING FROM USHGULI TO CHVELPI VIA LATPARI PASS

SVANETI | GEORGIA

Hiking from Ushguli to Chvelpi via Latpari Pass is a great way to connect Upper and Lower Svaneti. You can skip the long journey back to Zugdidi by road and head straight towards Lechkhumi instead. It’s possible to complete the route in one long day, or split it in two with a lakeside camp before the pass. The first half of the hike is particularly scenic (weather permitting), with increasingly spectacular views of the Greater Caucasus Range to the north and Lechkhumi to the south. The entire descent from Latpari Pass to Chvelpi is on a dirt road, making it straightforward but pretty uninspiring. From Chvelpi, a daily marshrutka departs in the morning for the 3 hour drive to Kutaisi.

In this guide we cover everything you need to know about hiking from Ushguli to Chvelpi. This includes a detailed outline of the route, trekking distances and times, camping and accommodation options, packing lists, transport info, and more. We also provide a map and our GPX track download to help you find your way.

The itinerary outlined below is a 2 day version of the hike, but it’s possible to complete the route in 1 day if you’re a fast hiker. We did the hike over 2 days, camping at the grassy area before the pass as shown in our accompanying film. The lake is a much nicer spot though, so we’ve amended the itinerary below to reflect what we think is the ideal route.

*Some of the links in this post are affiliate links – if you purchase a product or service via these links, we may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps offset the cost of running this blog and keeps us travelling so that we can continue to produce great content for you. We greatly appreciate your support!*

USHGULI TO CHVELPI QUICK FACTS

            • Distance | 22.5 km
            • Duration | 1 – 2 days
            • Start/End | Ushguli/Chvelpi (or vice versa)
            • Min Elevation | 1145 m (Chvelpi)
            • Max Elevation | 2965 m (above Latpari Pass)
            • Total Ascent | 1264 metres
            • Total Descent | 2204 metres
            • Hiking Season | July – September (possibly mid-June – mid-October)
            • River Crossings | None
            • Water Sources | Streams and springs 

USHGULI TO CHVELPI QUICK FACTS

Distance
22.5 km

Duration
1 – 2 days

Start/End
Ushguli/Chvelpi
(or vice versa)

Min Elevation
1145 m (Chvelpi)

Max Elevation
2965 m (above Latpari Pass)

Total Ascent
1264 metres

Total Descent
2204 metres

Hiking Season
July – September
(possibly mid-June – mid-October)

River Crossings
None

Water Sources
Streams and springs

 


WATCH OUR FILM

Watch the behind the scenes version of our Ushguli to Chvelpi hike on Instagram stories

Watch the behind the scenes
version of our Ushguli to Chvelpi
trek on Instagram stories 

USHGULI TO CHVELPI HIKING MAP

USHGULI TO CHVELPI

HIKING MAP

Use the map below to help guide you from Ushguli to Chvelpi via Latpari Pass. Tap the menu button at the top left for more details, to toggle layers on and off, and switch between satellite and terrain view.

To use an offline version of this map, download our KML file for use with Maps.me (iOS/Android), or the GPX file for use with other offline mapping apps such as Gaia (iOS/Android) or OsmAnd Maps (iOS/Android). See the expandable box below for tips on using these apps. 


To save this map to use online on desktop or mobile just tap the star symbol at the top. When you open Google Maps on your phone, navigate to ‘Saved’ at the bottom, then swipe along to ‘Maps’ at the top. You’ll find this map in your list of maps.

On desktop, click the three lines at the top left, select ‘Your Places’, then ‘Maps’. Click the map, then scroll down and select ‘Open in My Maps’ to access the interactive version.

Alternatively, just tap the rectangle symbol at the top right of the map in this blog post to view the My Maps version larger on desktop.

Unfortunately, it’s not possible to view this version of the map offline, but we’ve provided a download for a similar version for offline use.


MAPS.ME

Maps.me is our go-to offline mapping app. We find it straightforward to use for planning routes in advance, as well as navigating on the trail. It doesn’t drain our phone battery, and it’s quick and easy to save and organise ‘bookmarks’. There are many trails already marked on Maps.me, plus you can download and import a KML track of your route to the app. 

To use Maps.me, first download the app (iOS/Android). Hover over the region or country that you want to visit and the app will prompt you to download this map. Once downloaded, it can be viewed offline. 

You can tap anywhere and save it as a ‘bookmark’ by tapping the star symbol at the bottom. Hit ‘Edit Bookmark’ to personalise the bookmark colour, organise your bookmarks into different folders, and rename them. 

You can navigate easily or plan routes in advance by tapping your start point and selecting ‘route from’, then tapping your end point and selecting ‘route to’. Tap the car, walking, or cycling symbol at the top of the screen to indicate your mode of travel. If you want to plot a different route to the one suggested by Maps.me, just tap a third (or fourth, fifth, etc.) bookmark between the start and end points and select ‘add stop’. 

Maps.me shows the distance and travel time, plus elevation profiles for hiking trails. Note that the estimated time isn’t always reliable, but we’ve always found the distance and elevation gain/loss to be largely accurate. It only shows very basic contour lines.

You can track your progress on the trail using GPS. The arrow shows your direction of travel. Tap the compass at the top right of the screen to keep the map in a fixed position (the arrow will rotate). Alternatively, tap the arrow at the bottom right of the screen to rotate the map in the direction of travel (the arrow will stay in a fixed position).

GAIA

Gaia (iOS/Android) is another offline mapping app that is very useful. It shows the contours in much more detail than Maps.me, as long as you have previously viewed the section of map online. With a paid membership you can download various maps in advance for offline use. The app has existing OpenStreetMap trails marked and you can import GPX tracks and view them offline. You can also create new routes online yourself and export them as GPX or KML files. You can navigate easily on the trail using the arrow that shows your GPS location. Unlike with Maps.me, it isn’t possible to quickly check distances between two points (or at least we haven’t figured out a way to do it). There are a lot of useful features in the free version and even more benefits if you have a paid annual membership, so if you spend a lot of time outdoors it is worthwhile learning how to use the app to its full advantage. 

In our experience, Gaia drains your phone battery much quicker than Maps.me, even in flight mode, so it’s best to shut down the app completely each time you finish using it. 

OSMAND MAPS

OsmAnd Maps (iOS/Android) is another great offline mapping app with lots of useful features. In our opinion, it’s not as intuitive as Maps.me, and it has so many features that it can be a bit overwhelming at first. Like Gaia, we recommend checking out the written and video tutorials on the OsmAnd website to learn how to fully use the app. The benefits of the app include being able to plot routes in advance and save them as GPX tracks, and to view detailed elevation and terrain information, including surface types. You can also import GPX tracks. One downside is that the free version does not include contour lines, but these can be added via a paid plugin.


USHGULI TO CHVELPI HIKE BREAKDOWN

We’ve broken down the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike into separate days and sections below.

We’ve also given approximate timings and distances for each day and section, as well as approximate figures for elevation gain and loss. The total daily figures for elevation gain and loss are based on our recorded route using Garmin and may not be 100% accurate, but they are a good guide of what to expect. The elevation gain and loss figures for each hiking section are estimates based on our recorded track and mapping apps.

The timings are based around average hiking speeds and are intended as a rough guide. If you’re a fast hiker it may take you less time, and conversely, if you’re a slow hiker it may take you longer.

ELEVATION PROFILE AND 3D ROUTE MAP VIDEO

Ushguli to Chvelpi via Latpari Pass Elevation Profile

The elevation profile of the trek, starting in the middle of Ushguli (at the main bridge over the Enguri)  and finishing at Chvelpi (Mtis Broli Guesthouse)



DAY 1 | USHGULI → LAKESIDE CAMP

8.7 km | + 1074 / – 268 | 4 – 5 hours

DAY 1

USHGULI
LAKESIDE CAMP

8.7 km

+ 1074 m / – 268 m

4 – 5 hours

Day 1 is what this trek is all about. It starts with a climb up to Gorvashi Pass on the Svaneti Range, and if the skies are clear, there are incredible views all around. The route continues along the ridge before climbing a little and then descending to a lovely lakeside camp spot.

USHGULI → GORVASHI PASS | 4.5 km | + 897 m / – 77 m | 2.5 – 3 hours

USHGULI →
GORVASHI PASS

4.5 km | + 897 m / – 77 m

2.5 – 3 hours

The climb towards Latpari Pass starts with an 870 metre ascent to a pass just below Mt Gvibari. You can approach the trail from two different directions, depending on your start point in Ushguli. Regardless, both approaches merge just after the bridge over the Enguri River, near Murkmeli Village, and from here the climb begins. The path sticks to the right bank of the stream initially, before crossing to the left bank and following the right bank of another stream. It continues up the hillside, climbing steadily through some overgrown sections. Later in the season, wild blueberries grow on bushes by the trailside around here.

After nearly 600 metres of climbing, you’ll reach a point where the trail takes a sharp right turn. There are a couple of spots for camping here, and a seasonal spring (but we would recommend filling up from the stream 140 metres below, in case this one is dry).

The trail flattens out for a short traverse along the hillside through rhododendrons, the roots of which will try their best to trip you up. It then curves to the left and starts the final climb to Gorvashi Pass (2917 m). The views are wonderful (given the right weather!) and you can relax a little knowing that the bulk of the climbing is behind you for the day.

A hiker climbs through rhodedendrons on the way to Gorvashi Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike, with Ushguli tiny below Shkhara obscured by cloud

Climbing towards Gorvashi Pass on an overcast day, with Ushguli visible below but sadly no Greater Caucasus views



A hiker climbs through rhodedendrons on the way to Gorvashi Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike, with Ushguli tiny below Shkhara obscured by cloud

Climbing towards Gorvashi Pass on an
overcast day, with Ushguli visible below
but sadly no Greater Caucasus views



GORVASHI PASS → LAKESIDE CAMP | 4.2 km | + 177 / – 191 m | 1.5 – 2 hours

GORVASHI PASS
→ LAKESIDE CAMP

4.2 km | + 177 / – 191 m

1.5 – 2 hours

From Gorvashi Pass, the trail weaves its way westward along the ridge. You’ll pass a very small lake after about 1 km, and numerous viewpoints open up here and there. The trail undulates across and curves around the hillside for about 3.5 km, then climbs a rocky trail to the right. It leads to a viewpoint of a bigger lake before gently descending right to its shore.

If you are splitting the hike into 2 days, this is by far the best spot to camp. There is a nice flat grassy area and a few rock slabs dotted about. It feels like a little sanctuary, tucked in below a mountain with open views across the valleys to the east and the snowy peaks beyond. The lake water is clear and a suitable water source as long as you treat it.


The view westward towards Mestia from the ridge on the Ushguli to Mestia hike

A hiker arrives at the first main lake on the ridge, the best place to camp on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

The view westward towards Mestia from the ridge on the Ushguli to Mestia hike

Looking west towards Mestia, you can see Iprali
village on the opposite slope below, and in the
far distance, Chaladi Glacier shining in the sun


A hiker arrives at the first main lake on the ridge, the best place to camp on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Arriving at the first main lake, in our opinion the
best place to camp on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike 


Looking back eastward along the ridgeline to Gorvashi Pass from the first main lake, the best place to camp along the ridge on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Looking eastward from the lake, back along the ridge
towards Gorvashi Pass and the (hidden) Greater
Caucasus mountains beyond



DAY 2 | LAKESIDE CAMP → CHVELPI

13.6 km | + 190 m / – 1936 m | 3.5 – 4.5 hours

DAY 2

LAKESIDE CAMP
CHVELPI

13.6 km

+ 190 m / – 1936 m

3.5 – 4.5 hours

Day 2 involves a short climb to Latpari Pass, followed by an 1800 metre descent on a dirt road all the way to Chvelpi. In Chvelpi you can spend the night at Mtis Broli guesthouse and catch a marshrutka to Kutaisi the following morning.

LAKESIDE CAMP → LATPARI PASS | 2.5 km | + 118 m / – 182 m | 1 – 1.5 hours

LAKESIDE CAMP
→ LATPARI PASS

2.5 km | + 118 m / – 182 m

1 – 1.5 hours

The trail leads up directly behind the lake, then curves around the hillside to the right for about 400 metres. It then takes a sharp right turn and climbs to the highest point of the trek.

From here it’s a gentle downhill trail all the way to Latpari Pass. You’ll soon spot the dirt road carving up the mountainside and the endless electricity pylons stretching into the distance, snapping you out of wilderness mode and straight back to civilisation. A large flat grassy area sits to the right of the trail just before the pass, a good alternative spot to camp.

A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Morning views of Tetnuldi and neighbouring peaks from the trail above Latpari Pass



A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Morning views of Tetnuldi and neighbouring
peaks from the trail above Latpari Pass



At Latpari Pass two dirt roads meet, one coming from the main Mestia – Ushguli road near Iprali, the other leading to Chvelpi. There is a small church, a lake, and a ramshackle hut. The lake sits in a depression that lacks open mountain views, and there can be rubbish lying around due to the proximity to the hut, which we believe is often used by hunting groups. The road sits just above the lake and is largely out of sight, but the electricity pylons looming high overhead also make it a less attractive option for camping.

The lake, hut and church at Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Morning at Latpari Pass; the road disappearing to the left leads down to Chvelpi



The lake, hut and church at Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Morning at Latpari Pass; the road
heading left leads down to Chvelpi



LATPARI PASS → CHVELPI | 11.1 km | + 72 m / – 1754 m | 2.5 – 3 hours

LATPARI PASS → CHVELPI

11.1 km | + 72 m / – 1754 m

2.5 – 3 hours

There’s not a lot to say about the descent from Latpari Pass to Chvelpi. It follows the dirt road the whole way, is tiring on the knees and legs, and takes around 2.5 hours. There’s a stream about 1.5 km from the lake, the only place along the road that we found to fill up water in late September. You have to climb down from the road a little to reach it.

There’s a marshy pond about half way down to Chvelpi. The views over the valley below are decent and there’s space for one tent. It also makes a decent snack stop with a tree offering shade and some respite from the sun.

The track continues down to Chvelpi village, where the guesthouse sits on the right as you enter. It’s a peaceful spot with an upstairs balcony, large garden, and a wood fired hot shower.

See More From Georgia

Two hikers traverse the grassy ridge on Day 2 of the Panorama Trail
A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike
The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia
A hiker on the steep final approach to Gul Pass, on the Chuberi to Mestia section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti
Mountains reflected in Kelitsadi Lake on a still morning
Two hikers and a dog rest on a rock in front of an unnamed lake on the Black Rock Lake trek
A hiker climbs the shale switchback trail to Atsunta Pass on the Shatili Omalo trek, with the layered mountains of Khevsureti behind
A hiker descends the switchback ridgeline trail from Chaukhi Pass to Abudelauri Lakes on the Juta to Roshka trek in Georgia
Snow capped Mt. Kazbek shining bright at sunrise, as seen from the town of Kazbegi (Stepantsminda) in northern Georgia
The settlement of Abano in Truso Valley, with the old monastery on the right and Zakagori Fortress seen behind
One of the best views of Gergeti Trinity Church, seen from the hiking trail to Gergeti Glacier and Mt. Kazbek
Hikers descend from the viewpoint at Kojori Fortress in Georgia
A UAZ Buhanka campervan parked at the side of a grassy track to Levani's Lake on the expansive Javakheti Plateau
A person walks beneath the huge dusty sky looking at the seemingly endless hazy view at Takhti-Tepha Mud Volcanoes in the Vashlovani Protected Area
Two people watch something in the distance from outside a parked 4x4 vehicle in the hills of Racha, Georgia.
Two hikers traverse the grassy ridge on Day 2 of the Panorama Trail
A view of Tetnuldi peak from Latpari Pass on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike
The twin peaks of Ushba and Chatyn-Tau, seen from the trail on Day 2 of the Mestia to Ushguli trek in Svaneti, Georgia
A hiker on the steep final approach to Gul Pass, on the Chuberi to Mestia section of the Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti
Mountains reflected in Kelitsadi Lake on a still morning
Two hikers and a dog rest on a rock in front of an unnamed lake on the Black Rock Lake trek
A hiker climbs the shale switchback trail to Atsunta Pass on the Shatili Omalo trek, with the layered mountains of Khevsureti behind
A hiker descends the switchback ridgeline trail from Chaukhi Pass to Abudelauri Lakes on the Juta to Roshka trek in Georgia
Snow capped Mt. Kazbek shining bright at sunrise, as seen from the town of Kazbegi (Stepantsminda) in northern Georgia
The settlement of Abano in Truso Valley, with the old monastery on the right and Zakagori Fortress seen behind
One of the best views of Gergeti Trinity Church, seen from the hiking trail to Gergeti Glacier and Mt. Kazbek
Hikers descend from the viewpoint at Kojori Fortress in Georgia
A UAZ Buhanka campervan parked at the side of a grassy track to Levani's Lake on the expansive Javakheti Plateau
A person walks beneath the huge dusty sky looking at the seemingly endless hazy view at Takhti-Tepha Mud Volcanoes in the Vashlovani Protected Area
Two people watch something in the distance from outside a parked 4x4 vehicle in the hills of Racha, Georgia.

WHEN TO TREK FROM USHGULI TO CHVELPI

The trail is usually free of snow between mid-June and mid-October. July to September is the ideal time to trek.

USHGULI TO CHVELPI HIKE PRACTICALITIES

Hiking from Ushguli to Chvelpi via Latpari Pass isn’t too complicated, however the trail is in a remote area with no facilities along the way, so you need to be well prepared. We’ve covered a few practicalities below.

FOOD

There is nowhere to buy food along the trail. You need to carry everything with you. You can buy basic snacks in Ushguli, or bring food from your Ushguli guesthouse. You can get dinner and breakfast at the guesthouse in Chvelpi.

WATER

There are streams and mountain springs situated along the trail, and the water at the lake we suggest camping by is clear enough to sterilise and drink. Some springs run dry later in the season, so be aware that those marked on mapping apps can’t always be relied upon. Personally, we always sterilise drinking water collected from streams (using a Steripen), and we recommend you use your prefered sterilisation method to do the same.

MAPS AND NAVIGATION

The Ushguli to Chvelpi hiking trail is waymarked and signposted for the most part. However, it’s advisable to use an offline mapping app such as Maps.me, Gaia, or OSMand to follow the route via GPS. You can download our KML/GPX tracks to use with these apps.

A hiker climbing along the ridge between Ushguli and Chvelpi

After traversing the ridgeline from Gorvashi Pass, the trail climbs before descending to the first main lake (our suggested camp spot)



A hiker climbing along the ridge between Ushguli and Chvelpi

After traversing the ridgeline from Gorvashi Pass,
the trail climbs before descending to the first main
lake (our suggested camp spot)



MONEY

There are no ATMs in Ushguli or Chvelpi. The closest ATM is in Mestia. Be sure to bring enough cash (in small denominations) to pay for your meals, guesthouses, and transport. Cards are not accepted. Budget 50 – 75 GEL per person per night for dinner, bed, and breakfast.

PHONE RECEPTION AND INTERNET

Magticom has the widest coverage in the mountains, however phone reception and data connection is poor in Chvelpi. Wifi isn’t available at the guesthouse there either. Remember to set any webpages you want to reference on the trail to ‘read offline’ beforehand.

WEATHER FORECASTS

Yr.no is the best weather app (iOS/Android) we know of. It doesn’t work offline but you can check the weather in advance for Ushguli, Latpari Pass, and Sasashi (near Chvelpi). If you have a Garmin InReach like us, you can get weather reports at any location.

TRAVEL INSURANCE FOR TREKKING AT ALTITUDE

It’s important to note that most travel insurance providers will only cover hiking up to a certain altitude as standard (often 2500 m or 3000 m). In order to be covered for hiking above this, you will probably need to add on an ‘activity pack’ or such like. The highest point on the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike sits at 2965 m, so make sure you check in advance whether your travel insurance policy covers you or not.

Whether you are currently in your home country or are already travelling, two travel insurance policy providers that can cover for hiking above 3000 m are World Nomads (for residents of 140+ countries) and True Traveller (for UK and EEA residents only). We have purchased travel insurance policies from both of these companies in the past. We have found their policies to be comprehensive, and their online claims and extension processes straightforward.

If you still need to organise your travel insurance, we’d suggest getting a quote from each to see which suits you best.

TREK THE TRANSCAUCASIAN TRAIL IN UPPER SVANETI

USHGULI TO CHVELPI PACKING LIST

If you plan on hiking the route in one day, you can travel pretty light, but if you want to split up the hike over two days, you’ll need to carry camping gear and food. Either way, all-weather hiking clothes are recommended. We’ve compiled some packing lists and provided more info below.

ALL WEATHER CLOTHING

Make sure you pack clothing for all weather eventualities. The weather can be very unpredictable, change quickly, and vary on either side of the ridge. It’s good to have waterproofs and layers (including a base layer, mid layer, and outer layer). Ideally your base layers should be made from merino wool or sweat-wicking material. Avoid jeans or any cotton materials – if they get wet they are heavy, take forever to dry, and you’ll get cold easily. A hat, gloves and sunglasses are also a good idea. Make sure you have proper footwear (ideally hiking boots) that are broken in already.

Merino T-Shirt
His/Hers

Merino Thermal Baselayer
His/Hers
(if camping)

Merino Thermal Leggings
His/Hers
(if camping)

Merino Underwear
His/Hers

Sports Bra

Fleece
His/Hers

Down Jacket (if camping/hiking late in season)
His/Hers

Rain Jacket/Shell
His/Hers

Waterproof Trousers
His/Hers

Quick Drying Hiking Trousers
(preferably with zip-off shorts)
His/Hers

Trousers to wear around camp/guesthouses
(Lightweight, similar to above)

Trekking Socks
His/Hers

Warm Socks for night
(if camping/hiking late in season)

Gloves
Liner & Waterproof Outer

Sun Hat

Warm Hat
(if camping/hiking late in season)

Sunglasses

Hiking Boots
His/Hers


HIKING GEAR

You’ll need the usual hiking gear, such as a backpack, hiking poles, a refillable water bottle or water bladder, a water purification method, a first aid kit, rubbish bags for carrying out all your waste, a headtorch, and suncream.

Backpack + rain cover

Hiking Poles

Water Bladder/Water Bottle

Water Purifier (eg. Steripen, purification tablets, LifeStraw, etc.)

First Aid Kit

Penknife

Maps (offline GPS)

Rubbish Bag(s)

Headtorch

Suncream

Basic Toiletries

Toilet Paper

Toilet Trowel 

Hand Sanitiser

Power Bank

Travel Adapter


CAMPING EQUIPMENT

If you plan to camp, you’ll need a tent, sleeping mat, and sleeping bag. We always like to have a pillow and sleeping liner too. You’ll also need a small burner, gas canister and cooking supplies if you want a hot meal.

GUESTHOUSES AND CAMPING

There is a guesthouse at the end of the trail in Chvelpi, marked as Mtis Broli on Maps.me and other apps (contact Valeri +995 577 953516). The owner can arrange the Kutaisi bound marshrutka to pick you up at the bridge in the morning.

Mtis Broli Guesthouse in Chvelpi, at the end of the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Mtis Broli Guesthouse in Chvelpi



Mtis Broli Guesthouse in Chvelpi, at the end of the Ushguli to Chvelpi hike

Mtis Broli Guesthouse in Chvelpi



For camping, the best spot is by the lake 2.5 km before Latpari Pass. The next best spot is a big flat grassy area just before the pass. It’s also possible to camp by the lake at the pass, but it’s close to a hut, the dirt road, and has electricity pylons looming overhead so isn’t the nicest spot. About half way down the dirt road to Chvelpi there’s a marshy pond with enough space to pitch one tent next to it.

 In Ushguli, there are many accommodation options, mainly spread across the middle and upper parts of the community. We had a great stay at Guesthouse Angelina (+995598153538) which is near Lamaria Church at the very top of the village (if you’ve seen Dede you might recognise the mum, Shorena, as the doctor from the film). Other places that come recommended include XII Century, Nizharadze’s Tower, Guesthouse Qaldea, and Caucasus Guesthouse. You can browse many more options on booking.com.

HOW TO GET THERE/AWAY

To get to Ushguli, the first step is to travel to Mestia, then take a taxi or marshrutka to Ushguli. Many people also hike from Mestia to Ushguli on Georgia’s most popular trekking route.

GETTING TO MESTIA

To get to Mestia, the usual route is to first travel to Zugdidi by train. Search and book tickets via matarabeli.ge, tickets.railway.ge, or tkt.ge. Marshrutkas leave for Mestia from Zugdidi train station regularly from early morning until early afternoon (the last leaves around 1430). It takes 3 – 4 hours and costs 25 GEL.

From Kutaisi, a direct marshrutka departs from the bus station near McDonalds at 1000. Go early to secure a seat.

It’s also possible to fly from Kutaisi or Natakhtari (near Tbilisi) to Mestia with Vanilla Sky. Seats are very reasonably priced, however it’s a small plane and they book out far in advance, especially in peak summer season.

For a private car and driver, search options on gotrip.ge or ask locally for a taxi. Expect to pay around 150 – 200 GEL from Zugdidi to Mestia.

GETTING TO USHGULI

A taxi from Mestia to Ushguli costs 150+ GEL.

Marshrutkas depart from Mestia’s main square in the morning and cost 20 GEL per person.

Hiking typically takes 3 – 4 days on the classic Mestia to Ushguli trail.

LEAVING CHVELPI

One marshrutka a day travels between Chvelpi and Kutaisi, departing around 6 – 6:30 am. It starts in Mele village, about 13 km to the east. Your guesthouse owner can book a seat for you and ask the marshrutka driver to pick you up. It costs 15 GEL and takes around 2.5 – 3 hours.

ADD-ON TREKS/HIKES

This hike connects perfectly with the 8+ day Transcaucasian Trail in Svaneti (Chuberi to Mestia and Mestia to Ushguli). From Chvelpi it’s not far to the start of a trail crossing the Lechkhumi Range, south to Racha.

COME JOIN US ON INSTAGRAM

HIKING FROM USHGULI TO CHVELPI VIA LATPARI PASS

SVANETI | GEORGIA

That’s the lot for our Ushguli to Chvelpi hiking guide. If you have any useful info to add or stories to share, get in touch through the comments section below. Equally, if you have any questions, let us know and we’ll do our best to answer them. And if you’re planning your own trek, good luck and enjoy!

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Hiking From Ushguli To Chvelpi Via Latpari PassHiking From Ushguli To Chvelpi Via Latpari PassHiking From Ushguli To Chvelpi Via Latpari PassHiking From Ushguli To Chvelpi Via Latpari PassHiking From Ushguli To Chvelpi Via Latpari Pass
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