• THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY

    SCOTLAND

    Under leaden skies, a hiker is descending the trail towards Loch Tulla and Inveroran on the West Highland Way route section between Bridge of Orchy and Inveroran
  • WEST HIGHLAND WAY

    SCOTLAND

    A hiker in waterproofs climbing the hillside out of Tyndrum on a rainy day on the West Highland Way

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY

The 96 mile (154 km) West Highland Way is Scotland’s premier long-distance walking route, connecting the lowland town of Milngavie, on the outskirts of Glasgow, with the regional Highlands hub of Fort William, at the foot of Ben Nevis. The West Highland Way’s impressive scenery, ease of access, and abundance of camping and accommodation options make it popular with novice walkers and seasoned hikers alike.

In this guide we cover everything you need to know to plan your own journey on the WHW. This includes a route overview, itinerary suggestions, and practical info like what to pack, where to stay, when to go, where to eat, how to get there, how much it costs, and more. We also offer a downloadable route map which you can use to navigate on the trail and quickly pinpoint key sights, services, and facilities along the way.

*Some of the links in this post are affiliate links – if you purchase a product or service via these links, we may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps offset the cost of running this blog and keeps us travelling so that we can continue to produce great content for you. We greatly appreciate your support!*

WEST HIGHLAND WAY QUICK FACTS

      • Distance | 96 miles (154 km)
        Duration | 5+ days
        Start/End | Milngavie/Fort William (or vice versa)
        Min Elevation | 23 ft / 7 m
        Max Elevation | 1800 ft / 549 m
        Total Ascent | 13189 ft /  4020 metres
        Total Descent | 13379 ft / 4078 metres
        Hiking Season | Spring – Autumn (Experienced Hikers Only in Winter)
        Accommodation | Wild Camping, Campsites, Glamping, or B&Bs/Hotels
        Food & Water | Regular Cafes/Restaurants/Shops, Water Taps and Streams
        Baggage Transfer Service | Yes – to accommodation or campsites
        Public Transport Access | Yes – bus/train to start/end points,
        and many places along the route

WEST HIGHLAND WAY QUICK FACTS

Distance
96 miles (154) km

Duration
5+ days

Start/End
Milngavie/Fort William
(or vice versa)

Min Elevation
23 ft / 7 m

Max Elevation
1800 ft / 549 m

Total Ascent
13189 ft /  4020 metres

Total Descent
13379 ft / 4078 metres

Hiking Season
Spring – Autumn
(Experienced Hikers Only
in Winter)

Accommodation
Wild Camping, Campsites,
Glamping, or B&Bs/Hotels

Food & Water
Cafes/Restaurants/Shops,
Water Taps and Stream Water

Baggage Transfer Service
To accommodation or campsites

Public Transport Access
Bus/train to start/end points and
many places along the route

 


WATCH OUR FILM

Watch the behind the scenes version of our West Highland Way hike on Instagram stories

Watch the behind the scenes
version of our West Highland
Way hike on Instagram stories 

West Highland Way Stories
Part One | Part Two

WEST HIGHLAND WAY ROUTE MAP

We have created a detailed West Highland Way Map to accompany this guide. The walking route from Milngavie to Fort William is marked on the map, along with key sights and facilities such as toilets, water taps, honesty boxes, shops, and cafes/restaurants. Accommodation and paid campsites as referenced in this guide are also marked on the map, as are key transport links available along the route. You can use the digital map online, or download it for offline use with a mapping app such as Maps.me or Gaia GPS to navigate on the trail and quickly pinpoint key sights and services along the way. 

WEST HIGHLAND WAY TRAIL OVERVIEW

Most people walk the West Highland Way from south to north, and we’d recommend doing the same.

THE ROUTE

Clearly signposted throughout, the route starts on the outskirts of Glasgow, Scotland’s largest city. From Milngavie (pronounced Mill-guy) it leads through rolling farmland towards Conic Hill and Loch Lomond, the largest loch in Scotland. The trail hugs the ancient oak-wood covered eastern shore, crossing the Highland Boundary Fault and working its way alongside rivers, through glens, and across heather moorlands, to one of Scotland’s most celebrated landscapes – Glencoe. Surrounded by dramatic mountains, the route continues up steep trails and through quiet passes to emerge at the foot of Ben Nevis, and the highland hub of Fort William.

Many people opt to walk the WHW over 5 – 8 days, but it is possible to do it over a shorter or longer period. In the table below, we note the distances between all the places on the route that have accommodation and/or campsites. We’ve also included stages to/from Crianlarich, which is 0.9 miles / 1.5 km off the main route but a common overnight spot for many. For each stage we’ve noted the approximate elevation gain and loss, and provided an estimated range for walking time without breaks (it is of course possible to complete each stage faster or slower than the given estimate).

If viewing on a mobile device or tablet, scroll to the right to see the full table or flip your screen to landscape mode.

STAGEDISTANCEELEVATION GAIN

ELEVATION LOSSHIKING TIME
MILNGAVIE TO DRYMEN12 miles / 19 km+794 ft / + 242 m– 764 ft / – 233 m3h30m – 5 hours
DRYMEN TO BALMAHA7.5 miles / 12 km+ 1155 ft / + 352 m– 1319 ft / – 402 m2h30m – 3h30m
BALMAHA TO ROWARDENNAN7.5 miles / 12 km+ 827 ft / + 252 m– 784 ft / – 239 m2h30m – 3h30m
ROWARDENNAN TO INVERSNAID7.5 miles / 12 km+ 794 ft / + 242 m– 797 ft / – 243 m2h30m – 3h30m
INVERSNAID TO INVERARNAN6.5 miles / 10 km+ 705 ft / + 215 m– 722 ft / – 220 m2h30m – 3h30m
INVERARNAN TO TYNDRUM12 miles / 19 km+ 1791 ft / + 546 m– 1142 / – 348 m3h30m – 5h30m
INVERARNAN TO CRIANLARICH7 miles / 11 km+ 994 ft / + 303 m– 489 ft / – 149 m2h15m – 3h20m
CRIANLARICH TO TYNDRUM7 miles / 11 km+ 1096 ft / + 334 m– 951 ft / – 290 m2 – 3 hours
TYNDRUM TO BRIDGE OF ORCHY7 miles / 11 km+ 341 ft / + 104 m– 676 ft / – 206 m2 – 3 hours
BRIDGE OF ORCHY TO INVERORAN2.4 miles / 4 km+ 600 ft / + 183 m– 459 ft / – 140 m45 mins – 1h15m
INVERORAN TO KINGSHOUSE9.5 miles / 15.5 km+ 1188 ft / + 362 m– 866 ft / – 264 m3 – 4 hours
KINGSHOUSE TO KINLOCHLEVEN9 miles / 14.5 km+ 1243 ft / + 379 m– 2014 ft / – 614 m3 – 5 hours
KINLOCHLEVEN TO GLEN NEVIS13 miles / 21 km+ 2077 ft / + 633 m– 2044 ft / – 623 m4h30m – 6h30m
GLEN NEVIS TO FORT WILLIAM2.6 miles / 4 km+ 49 ft / + 15 m– 82 ft / – 25 m45 mins – 1 hour

THE TERRAIN

You can expect to walk on a mixture of footpaths, forest tracks, historic drover roads, gravel tracks, old military roads, and the occasional pavement or roadside verge. Although not difficult for the most part the terrain can be mixed: rocky underfoot on long stretches of drover or military roads, slippery and/or slow going on the shores of Loch Lomond with tree roots and rocks to negotiate, and largely straightforward on the well maintained footpaths and gravel roads.

ELEVATION

The highest point on the trail is 1800 ft / 549 m, with most of the West Highland Way remaining at fairly low elevation. The image below shows the elevation profile of the entire route, with height displayed in metres and distance in kilometres. The scale makes it look a little more dramatic than it really is, but you get the idea.

West Highland Way Route Elevation Profile

CHALLENGING SECTIONS

There are no technically challenging sections and you are never too far from a settlement or road. Saying that, some parts of the West Highland Way are more challenging than others, either due to the terrain or the elevation gain and loss.

For example, much of the section between Rowardennan and Inverarnan is tricky underfoot, making it slower going than other parts of the trail. Between Inveroran and Kinlochleven, and Kinlochleven and Fort William, there are greater climbs and descents than on most other days. And in poor weather, the exposed sections on Rannoch Moor and around the Devil’s Staircase can be tough going. However, all these sections happen to be among the highlights of the West Highland Way in our opinion, the reward far outweighing the effort required.

3D ROUTE MAP

Watch our 3D relief map video of the entire West Highland Way route.


HOW DIFFICULT IS THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY?

While we’re sure nobody would claim the West Highland Way to be a walk in the park, it is a very achievable long-distance hiking route that attracts walkers of all ages and experience levels. It is clearly waymarked throughout, there are numerous accommodation and food options to provide comfort, sustenance, and motivation, and it is predominantly a low-level walk with no high mountain passes or technically challenging terrain. There are also frequent access points along the Way, providing an easy escape route if necessary.

However, walking long distances day-after-day can take its toll on your feet and cause various bodily aches and pains, making this a physically and therefore mentally challenging walk. Being well prepared with the right gear, starting with at least a moderate level of fitness, and planning an itinerary within your own capabilities will help set you up for an enjoyable, safe, and successful journey.

WHEN TO WALK THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY

SPRING & AUTUMN

The most pleasant (and popular!) times to walk the West Highland Way are late April and May and the first half of September. The weather is often good, the daylight hours are long, and the midges aren’t usually out in force. The flip side is that it can be busier on the trail and accommodation can get booked up quickly, so advance planning and reservations are recommended.

A young lamb among the hills of the Lairigmor on the West Highland Way

Spring is a good time to see young lambs along the trail



A young lamb among the hills of the Lairigmor on the West Highland Way

Spring is a good time to see young lambs



SUMMER

Summer is also a popular time with even longer daylight hours and a chance of good weather, however it is midge season which can be especially bothersome if you’re camping. Midges are particularly active at dawn and dusk and like still, humid conditions. If there’s a breeze, you should be fine, but on a calm night or morning, swarms of the tiny biting insects can descend on you. A midge net and bottle of Smidge is definitely recommended for anyone walking the trail in June, July, or August, and sometimes May and September.

WINTER

Between October and early April there can be wintry conditions along the trail, especially at higher elevations on the northern part of the route: on Rannoch Moor, around the Devil’s Staircase, and on the Lairigmor between Kinlochleven and Fort William. Most baggage transfer services and campsites do not operate in winter, and some accommodation will be closed too. In general, a winter walk on the WHW is best suited to fit and experienced hikers with good winter navigational skills, cold-weather clothing, and equipment such as crampons and ice axes in case of slippery traverses of snow-covered slopes.

HOLIDAYS & SPECIAL EVENTS

During holiday periods such as Easter, local holiday weekends and school holidays, the trail and accommodation are likely to be busier than usual. Annual events such as ultra-marathons, races, and motorcycle trials also take place along the Way, and you may want to avoid walking at this time. Check the notices page on the official website for event updates.

WATCH THE WEATHER

Our preferred apps for accurate weather forecasts are Yr.no (iOS/Android) and Windy (iOS/Android). Windy has the WHW route marked on it if you zoom in enough. Neither will work offline, so be sure to check the weather when you have a signal or wifi connection.

See More From Scotland

On an afternoon of bright light and deep shadow, a hiking couple stand on the rocky summit of Sgurr na Stri (one of the best hikes on Skye) overlooking the length of Loch Coruisk as it lies cradled amongst the sharp peaks of the Black Cuillin
Tall ship Bessie Ellen under sail off the coast of Jura in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland
A person in a long mustard coloured coat and black hat looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport on South Uist, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon
A yacht in the bay at Vatersay with pastel sunset skies and the silhouette of the Isle of Rum in the background
One of the two famous stacks of St Kilda, Stac Lee rises from the sea as birds swarm around and the tourist boat MV Cuma offloads kayakers below
A walker on the old military road among the dramatic mountain scenery of the Lairigmor, a real highlight of the West Highland Way
A view of Buachaille Etive Mor on the West Highland Way
A tent set up with expansive views of the surrounding hills near Ba Bridge on Rannoch Moor, this hiker found the perfect spot while camping the West Highland Way
A person stands on the wide expanse of Tresness Beach on Sanday
An impressive view of the Old Man of Hoy from the south, showing the towering stack detatched from the rugged red cliffs of the island's west coast
Standing stones set in a large circle, known as the Ring of Brodgar, one of Orkney's most iconic sites and Scotland's largest stone circle
A person walks along the unspoiled beach of the Tresness Peninsula on Sanday
Two surfers walk across the sand in the afternoon sun at Ceannabeinne Beach, not far from Durness on the North Coast 500 route.
An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.
Peanmeanach Bothy on the Ardnish Peninsula in February
Culross: Scotland's Best Preserved 17th century town
On an afternoon of bright light and deep shadow, a hiking couple stand on the rocky summit of Sgurr na Stri (one of the best hikes on Skye) overlooking the length of Loch Coruisk as it lies cradled amongst the sharp peaks of the Black Cuillin
Tall ship Bessie Ellen under sail off the coast of Jura in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland
A person in a long mustard coloured coat and black hat looking out towards the sea from a viewpoint above Loch Skipport on South Uist, with the Isle of Skye seen faintly on the horizon
A yacht in the bay at Vatersay with pastel sunset skies and the silhouette of the Isle of Rum in the background
One of the two famous stacks of St Kilda, Stac Lee rises from the sea as birds swarm around and the tourist boat MV Cuma offloads kayakers below
A walker on the old military road among the dramatic mountain scenery of the Lairigmor, a real highlight of the West Highland Way
A view of Buachaille Etive Mor on the West Highland Way
A tent set up with expansive views of the surrounding hills near Ba Bridge on Rannoch Moor, this hiker found the perfect spot while camping the West Highland Way
A person stands on the wide expanse of Tresness Beach on Sanday
An impressive view of the Old Man of Hoy from the south, showing the towering stack detatched from the rugged red cliffs of the island's west coast
Standing stones set in a large circle, known as the Ring of Brodgar, one of Orkney's most iconic sites and Scotland's largest stone circle
A person walks along the unspoiled beach of the Tresness Peninsula on Sanday
Two surfers walk across the sand in the afternoon sun at Ceannabeinne Beach, not far from Durness on the North Coast 500 route.
An abandoned boat wreck on the Isle of Mull.
Peanmeanach Bothy on the Ardnish Peninsula in February
Culross: Scotland's Best Preserved 17th century town

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO WALK THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY?

The cost of walking the West Highland Way varies greatly depending on how you choose to do it. Do you plan to camp or stay in accommodation every night? Will you use a baggage transfer service or not? How often will you eat out vs. cooking for yourself? And what transport will you take to and from the trailheads? We’ve broken down each category below to give you an idea of a typical West Highland Way budget.

ACCOMMODATION

Wild Camping: Free

Campsites: Average £10 pppn (per person/per night)

Budget Accommodation: £30 – £50 pppn

Mid-Range Accommodation: £50 – £75 pppn

High-End Accommodation: £75 – £125 pppn

FOOD

Breakfast: Often incl. in room rate, otherwise £8 – £15 pp

Packed Lunch: £6 – £8 pp

Dinner: £15 – £20 pp (main meal)

Snacks: Coffee £3, Cake £3 – £4

Honesty Box Items: £1.50 – £3

TRANSPORT

Train: Glasgow – Milngavie and Train: Fort William – Glasgow: £30 – £40

Train: Glasgow – Milngavie and Bus: Fort William – Glasgow: £30 – £35

BAGGAGE TRANSFER

Full Route x 1 Bag: £65

Part Route x 1 Bag: £45

Reverse Route x 1 Bag: £85


In a nutshell, if you carry your own bag, wild camp every night, cook for yourself, and take the cheapest transport to/from Glasgow, your entire spend would be around £30 plus the cost of your provisions. If you sleep in accommodation every night, eat out for all of your meals, and have a couple of snacks each day, you should budget between £65 and £180 per day (depending on your level of accommodation), plus around £105 in total for transport and baggage transfers. If you opt for a mixture of camping and accommodation then your costs will be somewhere in between.

WEST HIGHLAND WAY ITINERARY SUGGESTIONS

The number of days you take to walk the West Highland Way is completely up to you. Your decision may be influenced by a wide variety of factors, such as the amount of time you have off work, availability of accommodation, personal fitness level, preference for how many miles you walk each day, the addition of rest days or side trips, and so on.

In the tables below, we outline some suggested West Highland Way itineraries that cover various time frames. This should make it easier for you to plan the right itinerary. Each itinerary table shows daily stages, distances, elevation gain/loss, and an estimated hiking time range (without breaks).

If you are wild camping, you will have more flexibility with how far you walk each day, and indeed it’s best to camp either before or after the main settlements. If you are staying at campsites or in accommodation, you will need to plan your itinerary around the location of these facilities. There are a number of such options along each section of the Way, allowing you to plan shorter or longer distances as you like. The only exception is the final stage from Kinlochleven to Glen Nevis/Fort William, which has no campsites or accommodation en route, meaning your final day will always be at least 13 – 15 miles (21 – 25 km).

A hiker looks out across Loch Lomond on the footbridge before Inversnaid on the West Highland Way

Appreciating morning views of Loch Lomond from the bridge just before Inversnaid



A hiker looks out across Loch Lomond on the footbridge before Inversnaid on the West Highland Way

Stopping to appreciate morning views of Loch
Lomond from the bridge just before Inversnaid



SUGGESTED 5 DAY WEST HIGHLAND WAY ITINERARY

To complete the West Highland Way in 5 days you should be fit and experienced at walking many miles, day after day. When considering if this is the right itinerary for you, be sure to consider the weight you will be carrying and the number of daylight hours at the time of year you plan to walk.

Day 1Milngavie to Balmaha19.5 miles / 31 km+ 594 m / – 635 m6h – 8h30m
Day 2Balmaha to Inverarnan21.5 miles / 34 km+ 709 m / – 702 m7h30m – 10h30m
Day 3 (Option 1)Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy19 miles / 30 km+ 640 m / – 554 m5h30m – 8h30m
Day 3 (Option 2)Inverarnan to Inveroran21.4 miles / 34 km+ 833 m / – 554 m6h15m – 9h45m
Day 4 (Option 1)Bridge of Orchy to Kinlochleven20.9 miles / 34 km+ 924 m / – 1018 m6h45m – 10h15m
Day 4 (Option 2)Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 5Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours
Day 1Milngavie to Balmaha19.5 miles / 31 km+ 594 m / – 635 m6h – 8h30m
Day 2Balmaha to Inverarnan21.5 miles / 34 km+ 709 m / – 702 m7h30m – 10h30m
Day 3 (Option 1)Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy19 miles / 30 km+ 640 m / – 554 m5h30m – 8h30m
Day 3 (Option 2)Inverarnan to Inveroran21.4 miles / 34 km+ 833 m / – 554 m6h15m – 9h45m
Day 4 (Option 1)Bridge of Orchy to Kinlochleven20.9 miles / 34 km+ 924 m / – 1018 m6h45m – 10h15m
Day 4 (Option 2)Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 5Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours

SUGGESTED 6 DAY WEST HIGHLAND WAY ITINERARY

Walking the West Highland Way in 6 days is also a challenging itinerary, requiring you to walk considerable distances over consecutive days. Our suggested route divides the section between Balmaha and Inverarnan (generally considered one of the toughest and slowest-going sections of the WHW) over two days, with an overnight at Inversnaid. This differs from the 6 Day itinerary on the official WHW website which suggests walking all the way from Rowardennan to Crianlarich on Day 3 – the longest day on that itinerary at 20 miles (32 km). Given the terrain, we think that would be an exhaustingly long day.

Day 1Milngavie to Balmaha19.5 miles / 31 km+ 594 m / – 635 m6h – 8h30m
Day 2Balmaha to Inversnaid15 miles / 24 km+ 494 m / – 482 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Inversnaid to Crianlarich13.5 miles / 21 km+ 520 m / – 373 m5 – 7 hours
Day 4Crianlarich to Inveroran16.4 miles / 26 km+ 625 m / – 636 m4h45m – 7h15m
Day 5Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 6Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours
Day 1Milngavie to Balmaha19.5 miles / 31 km+ 594 m / – 635 m6h – 8h30m
Day 2Balmaha to Inversnaid15 miles / 24 km+ 494 m / – 482 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Inversnaid to Crianlarich13.5 miles / 21 km+ 520 m / – 373 m5 – 7 hours
Day 4Crianlarich to Inveroran16.4 miles / 26 km+ 625 m / – 636 m4h45m – 7h15m
Day 5Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 6Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours

SUGGESTED 7 DAY WEST HIGHLAND WAY ITINERARY

A 7 Day West Highland Way itinerary allows you to have a few shorter days, mixed with a few longer days. We have three suggested itineraries below, with an overview of what to expect from each. Personally we think the sections with the best scenery (those you want to savour rather than rush through) are Conic Hill and the shores of Loch Lomond, and between Bridge of Orchy and Fort William. With that said, we’d consider Option 2 or 3 to be ideal. Option 1 matches one of the official WHW website suggested 7 day routes. Our own wild camping itinerary (7.5 days) most closely resembles Option 2.

Option 1: a straightforward day, a couple of tougher days, a couple of straightforward days, a couple of tougher days

Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles / 22 km+ 457 m / – 463 m5 – 7 hours
Day 4Inverarnan to Tyndrum12 miles / 19 km+ 546 m / – 348 m3h30m – 5h30m
Day 5Tyndrum to Inveroran9.4 miles /15 km+ 287 m / – 346 m2h45m – 4h15m
Day 6Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 7Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours
Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles / 22 km+ 457 m / – 463 m5 – 7 hours
Day 4Inverarnan to Tyndrum12 miles / 19 km+ 546 m / – 348 m3h30m – 5h30m
Day 5Tyndrum to Inveroran9.4 miles /15 km+ 287 m / – 346 m2h45m – 4h15m
Day 6Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 7Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours

Option 2: a straightforward day, a tough section over 3 days instead of 2, a long but straightforward day, 2 tougher days

Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inversnaid7.5 miles / 12 km+ 242 m / – 243 m2h30m – 3h30m
Day 4Inversnaid to Crianlarich13.5 miles / 21 km+ 520 m / – 373 m5 – 7 hours
Day 5Crianlarich to Inveroran16.4 miles / 26 km+ 625 m / – 636 m4h45m – 7h15m
Day 6Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 7Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours
Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inversnaid7.5 miles / 12 km+ 242 m / – 243 m2h30m – 3h30m
Day 4Inversnaid to Crianlarich13.5 miles / 21 km+ 520 m / – 373 m5 – 7 hours
Day 5Crianlarich to Inveroran16.4 miles / 26 km+ 625 m / – 636 m4h45m – 7h15m
Day 6Inveroran to Kinlochleven18.5 miles / 30 km+ 741 m / – 878 m6 – 9 hours
Day 7Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours

Option 3: a straightforward day, a couple of tougher days, a very long but straightforward day, a tough section split over 2 days instead of 1, and finished with a tougher day

Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles / 22 km+ 457 m / – 463 m5 – 7 hours
Day 4Inverarnan to Inveroran21.4 miles / 34 km+ 833 m / – 694 m6h15m – 9h45m
Day 5Inveroran to Kingshouse9.5 miles / 15.5 km+ 362 m / – 264 m 3 – 4 hours
Day 6Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles / 14.5 km+ 379 m / – 614 m3 – 5 hours
Day 7Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours
Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inverarnan14 miles / 22 km+ 457 m / – 463 m5 – 7 hours
Day 4Inverarnan to Inveroran21.4 miles / 34 km+ 833 m / – 694 m6h15m – 9h45m
Day 5Inveroran to Kingshouse9.5 miles / 15.5 km+ 362 m / – 264 m 3 – 4 hours
Day 6Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles / 14.5 km+ 379 m / – 614 m3 – 5 hours
Day 7Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours

SUGGESTED 8 DAY WEST HIGHLAND WAY ITINERARY

An 8 Day West Highland Way itinerary allows you to break down the entire route into manageable sections, while enjoying the best scenery along the way. Of course, this could be split over more days for an even more relaxed pace, but 8 days is a great option which will suit many walkers. 

Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inversnaid7.5 miles / 12 km+ 242 m / – 243 m2h30m – 3h30m
Day 4Inversnaid to Crianlarich13.5 miles / 21 km+ 520 m / – 373 m5 – 7 hours
Day 5Crianlarich to Inveroran16.4 miles / 26 km+ 625 m / – 636 m4h45m – 7h15m
Day 6Inveroran to Kingshouse9.5 miles / 15.5 km+ 362 m / – 264 m3 – 4 hours
Day 7Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles / 14.5 km+ 379 m / – 614 m3 – 5 hours
Day 8Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours
Day 1Milngavie to Drymen12 miles / 19 km+ 242 m / – 233 m3h30m – 5h
Day 2Drymen to Rowardennan15 miles / 24 km+ 604 m / – 641 m5 – 7 hours
Day 3Rowardennan to Inversnaid7.5 miles / 12 km+ 242 m / – 243 m2h30m – 3h30m
Day 4Inversnaid to Crianlarich13.5 miles / 21 km+ 520 m / – 373 m5 – 7 hours
Day 5Crianlarich to Inveroran16.4 miles / 26 km+ 625 m / – 636 m4h45m – 7h15m
Day 6Inveroran to Kingshouse9.5 miles / 15.5 km+ 362 m / – 264 m3 – 4 hours
Day 7Kingshouse to Kinlochleven9 miles / 14.5 km+ 379 m / – 614 m3 – 5 hours
Day 8Kinlochleven to Fort William15.6 miles / 25 km+ 606 m / – 623 m5 – 7 hours

WEST HIGHLAND WAY HIGHLIGHTS & SECTION RECOMMENDATIONS

If you want to pick a section of the West Highland Way to walk over a couple of days or such like, there are some definite highlights we would recommend. If you’re walking the complete 96 mile route, these highlights are the sections we think you shouldn’t rush (plan your itinerary to cover more distance on the ‘non-highlight’ days if possible).

CONIC HILL AND LOCH LOMOND

Beautiful Loch Lomond dominates the southern half of the West Highland Way. Giant oak trees line the shore, towering over crystal clear water. Lush ferns and moss cling to the moist jumble of rocks scattered along the narrow, undulating trail. Countless beaches of small stones and, occasionally, soft sand provide peaceful rest stops or idyllic wild camps. Conic Hill, rising 1128 ft / 344 m at the southern end of the loch, provides the perfect vantage point above it all.

People rest and enjoy Loch Lomond views atop Conic Hill, on the Drymen to Balmaha section of the West Highland Way

West Highland Way walkers and day trippers from Balmaha enjoying Loch Lomond views on Conic Hill



People rest and enjoy Loch Lomond views atop Conic Hill, on the Drymen to Balmaha section of the West Highland Way

West Highland Way walkers and day trippers
from Balmaha enjoying the views on Conic Hill


Looking down from Conic Hill to the islands in the middle of Loch Lomond, on the Drymen to Balmaha section of the West Highland Way

Loch Lomond view from Conic Hill



While many people complete this section over 2 days (commonly walking from Drymen to Rowardennan, then Rowardennan to Inverarnan), we highly recommend splitting it over 3 if time allows (with an added overnight at or near Inversnaid). Generally considered to be the toughest section of the whole West Highland Way, we’re sure you’ll also enjoy it more by breaking it into smaller chunks and having time to really savour the uniqueness of the landscape. Our 6, 7, and 8 day suggested WHW itineraries all cover the Conic Hill and Loch Lomond section over three days.

And by the way, our very favourite part of this section is the walk between Rowardennan and Inversnaid, so we urge you not to take ‘the high road’ on an easy forest track that you may read about, and stick to the waymarked route instead!

If you want to walk this section by itself, you can get to Drymen or Balmaha by taking the train from Glasgow to Balloch, then Bus 309 from Balloch to Drymen, terminating at Balmaha. You can check times using Traveline. Return from Inverarnan to Glasgow by Citylink bus, or you could take the water bus from Ardleish to Ardlui, then take the train from Ardlui to Glasgow.

BRIDGE OF ORCHY TO FORT WILLIAM

Another highlight of the West Highland Way is the stretch between Bridge of Orchy and Fort William. Here you are walking through quintessential Highland scenes, complete with heather-covered moorland, dramatic mountains, and stags aplenty. Rannoch Moor, Glencoe and the Devil’s Staircase, and the Lairigmor are the three standout areas along the northern half of the WHW, seen on the Bridge of Orchy/Inveroran to Kingshouse, Kingshouse to Kinlochleven, and Kinlochleven to Fort William sections, respectively.

A view of Buachaille Etive Mor on the West Highland Way

Arriving in Glencoe to stunning views of the mighty Buachaille Etive Mor



A view of Buachaille Etive Mor on the West Highland Way

Arriving in Glencoe to stunning views
of the mighty Buachaille Etive Mor



This 36 mile / 58 km stretch would make a great standalone 3 day itinerary. There is easy access by both bus and train from Glasgow to Bridge of Orchy, and from Fort William back to Glasgow.

WEST HIGHLAND WAY MAPS, GUIDES & RESOURCES

The West Highland Way is very well signposted for the entire length of the trail, to the point where we only checked the route on our phones once or twice over the 96 miles. It would be foolish to set off relying solely on the waymarkings however, so we recommend you download and learn to use an offline mapping app (or two) in advance and pick up a paper map and/or guidebook.

RECOMMENDED MAPPING APPS & GPX/KML TRACK DOWNLOADS

Our go-to mapping apps when hiking are Organic Maps (iOS/Android) (similar to Maps.me but without ads) and Gaia GPS (iOS/Android). Unlike Google Maps, these apps can be used to navigate offline when you don’t have phone reception or have put your phone on flight mode to conserve battery. Using your phone’s GPS location, you can see exactly where you are on the map and follow along on the pre-downloaded route. You can also easily calculate the distance between locations, the estimated elevation gain and loss, and roughly how long it should take. 

The West Highland Way route is already marked on both of these mapping apps, however to make it extra obvious which route you should be following, we recommend downloading our KML (Organic Maps/Maps.me) and GPX (Gaia) tracks to the apps. This will load not only the route, but also all of our marked information such as accommodation, campsites, public toilets, water taps, shops, and so on, making it easy for you to pinpoint key sights and services along the trail and navigate straight to them. These KML and GPX track downloads are included with our WHW E-Map, which you can buy for £6.

An attractive wooden signpost pointing in the direction of the route on the West Highland Way

Although the West Highland Way is well signposted, it’s always handy to have the route and marked info downloaded to your phone



An attractive wooden signpost pointing in the direction of the route on the West Highland Way

Although the West Highland Way is well signposted
it’s always handy to have the route and marked info
downloaded to your phone



WEST HIGHLAND WAY MAPS AND GUIDEBOOKS

Having a paper map and guidebook is a great backup for a digital device. If you want a full guidebook we’d recommend the Cicerone West Highland Way pocket book, or the Trailblazer West Highland Way Guide.

Our recommended maps are the Harvey waterproof WHW map and Footprints waterproof WHW map.

If you’ve found our Guide to the WHW Route Sections helpful, we also offer this in PDF format. The PDF can be downloaded to your phone and viewed offline during your walk.

OTHER WEST HIGHLAND WAY RESOURCES

There is a very active West Highland Way Facebook group which can be a great resource for up-to-date info, tips, photos, and advice. We’d recommend using the search function within the group page to find answers to any questions you may have before asking in the group, as there’s every chance it will have been covered before.

The official West Highland Way website is also a good source for updates and info on upcoming events.

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WHAT TO PACK FOR THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY

There are some universal items that you need to walk the West Highland Way regardless of how you plan to do it. Of course, some extra items are required if you plan to camp, cook your own food, or stay in accommodation each night.

Below are our suggestions on what to pack for the West Highland Way, broken down into clothing, hiking gear, camping equipment, and extras for those staying in accommodation.

CLOTHING

No matter what time of year you’re walking the WHW, you must be prepared for all the different weather Scotland can throw at you. You need a waterproof jacket, waterproof trousers, and layers (including a breathable moisture-wicking base layer, an insulating mid layer, and an outer layer). Ideally your base layers should be made from merino wool. It keeps you cool when it’s hot and warm when it’s cool, and amazingly won’t stink even after days of use. It will dry quite fast too. Avoid jeans or any cotton materials – if they get wet they are heavy, take forever to dry, and you’ll get cold easily. A pair of quick-drying comfortable walking trousers (or leggings if you prefer) are also better than regular jogging bottoms or such like.

FOOTWEAR

Make sure you have proper footwear that is already broken in. We personally prefer hiking boots with good traction and ankle support, but if you are used to walking in trail runners or such like, the terrain on the WHW (outside of winter) is certainly suitable for this kind of footwear. A set of Superfeet insoles are also a great idea. They reduce foot fatigue, improve shock absorption, and help keep your feet in place, again reducing the chance of blisters or hot spots. It’s a good idea to pack a pair of flip-flops or sandals too for wearing in the evening around camp or at your accommodation.

It’s important to wear clean and dry quality socks (ideally merino wool), and change them regularly (at least every two days). Using a liner sock in conjunction with a thicker sock will help reduce the chance of blisters and hot spots. 

OTHER ITEMS

A hat, gloves and sunglasses are also needed. A buff is good for sun and wind protection. During midge season (roughly mid-May to mid-September), a midge net is a good idea. Gaiters will help keep your feet and trousers dry in wet or boggy conditions, and offer extra protection against ticks.

FULL CLOTHING CHECKLIST

For more information and an in-depth look at our recommended hiking clothing, including what we use and why, check out our complete hiking gear guide.

Merino Hiking T-Shirt x 2

His/Hers

Merino Thermal Baselayer
(if camping or hiking in colder months)

His/Hers

Merino Thermal Leggings
(if camping or hiking in colder months)

His/Hers

Merino Underwear x 3

His/Hers

Sports Bra x 2

Fleece

His/Hers

Down Jacket 

His/Hers

Rain Jacket/Shell

His/Hers

Waterproof Trousers

His/Hers

Quick Drying Hiking Trousers

(preferably with zip-off shorts)

His/Hers

Change of trousers to wear in evening

Hiking Socks x 4-6

His/Hers

Liner Socks x 4-6

His/Hers

Evening Socks x 1

Buff

Gloves

Liner & Waterproof Outer

Sun Hat

Warm Hat
(if camping or hiking in colder months)

Sunglasses

Hiking Boots or Trail Runners

His/Hers

Insoles

Flip-Flops / Sandals for evening

Gaiters

Midge Net


HIKING GEAR

Whether you plan to walk the WHW with a daypack (using a baggage transfer service for your main bag) or carry all your gear on your back, there are a number of items we recommend packing for the trail.

BACKPACK

Firstly, you’re going to need a backpack and rain cover. We love Osprey packs and highly recommend them for either your day pack or 40L+ backpack. A waterproof liner or dry sack is also helpful, especially for electrical items, or if you’re camping (when a dry change of clothes and dry sleeping equipment is essential).

Two large backpacks resting against each other in a green field on the West Highland Way

Our 70L and 50L backpacks; ideal for us with camping gear, food, and camera equipment, although something smaller will likely do most people



Two large backpacks resting against each other in a green field on the West Highland Way

Our 70L and 50L backpacks; ideal for us with
camping gear, food, and camera equipment,
although something smaller will likely do most



HIKING POLES

Hiking Poles are highly recommended for walking the WHW. They provide support for your knees while descending, give tired legs a boost on uphill sections, and help maintain your rhythm on the flat.

WATER

A refillable water bottle and/or water bladder is also essential, plus a water purification method if you want to be able to fill up at streams along the way. We use a Steripen and filter, but you could use water purification tablets, a LifeStraw, or such like.

FIRST AID

You should carry a basic first aid kit, including painkillers, ibuprofen, antihistamines, Compeed blister pads, bandages, sterile wipes and dressings, antiseptic cream, plasters, scissors, a tick remover, tape, and safety pins. You can buy handy pre-made kits, or make up your own.

RUBBISH BAGS & TOILET KIT

As you need to carry all of your waste off the trail to be disposed of in bins along the way, a rubbish bag is a good idea. If you’re wild camping, a toilet kit is essential (also useful for all walkers in case of a toilet emergency). Your toilet kit should include some toilet paper or pocket tissues, a rubbish bag to put your used toilet paper in (nappy sacks or dog poo bags work great), antibacterial hand gel, and a pocket trowel for digging a toilet hole and covering it over if you need to poo.

OTHER ITEMS

Other useful items include a headtorch, suncream, insect repellent such as Smidge, snacks, a phone with charging cable and power bank, a penknife, and a map of your route. A waterproof phone case can be very handy on wet weather days. Some electrolyte tabs are great for an energy boost and keeping you hydrated on hot, sweaty days. A travel adapter can be useful for charging multiple devices at once at cafes along the way, or at your accommodation at night.

Backpack + rain cover

Pack Liner and/or Dry Bag

Hiking Poles

Water Bladder/Water Bottle

Water Purifier (eg. Steripen, purification tablets, LifeStraw, etc.)

First Aid Kit

Tick Remover

Penknife

Maps (offline GPS and paper)

Rubbish Bag(s)

Headtorch

Suncream

Insect Repellent 

Toilet Paper

Toilet Trowel

Hand Sanitiser

Nappy Sacks or Dog Poo Bags

Phone

Charging Cable

Power Bank

Waterproof Phone Pouch

Travel Adapter 

Electrolyte Tablets


EXTRAS FOR STAYING IN ACCOMMODATION

As well as everything outlined in the checklists above, we’d recommend a few extra items if you plan on staying in accommodation on the West Highland Way.

First, you’ll likely be able to have a shower every day, so pack some basic toiletries such as a toothbrush and toothpaste, soap, and shampoo. This can be packed in your overnight bag if utilising a luggage transfer service. Towels are usually provided in B&Bs, guesthouses, and hotels, but if you’re staying in hostels, bunkhouses, or glamping, you’ll likely need your own towel. A lightweight microfibre towel is a good option.

Ear plugs and an eye mask are also a good idea if you’re staying in a shared room (or have a room buddy who snores!).

Some glamping options along the WHW do not include linen/bedding as standard, so you may need to bring a sleeping bag, travel towel, and travel pillow if you’re booked to stay at these.

CAMPING EQUIPMENT

If you plan to camp, you’ll need a few extra things in addition to the items outlined in the checklists above. Most obviously that is a tent, sleeping mat, and sleeping bag. We also recommend a pillow for comfort and a sleeping liner for added warmth and to keep your sleeping bag clean. You’ll also need a small burner, gas canister and cooking supplies if you want a hot meal. Don’t forget some basic toiletries such as your toothbrush and toothpaste, plus soap, shampoo, and a travel towel if you plan to shower along the way.

Read about our tried and tested camping kit in our complete backpacking gear guide.

 Tent

Sleeping mat

Sleeping bag

Silk liner

Pillow

Small camping stove

Gas for stove
(available to buy at some shops along the way such as Beinglas Farm Shop and Tyndrum Green Welly Stop)

Pot

Spork

Cup

Bowl

Biodegradable washing up liquid

Basic Toiletries

Travel Towel


GET THE LOWDOWN ON OUR HIKING AND CAMPING GEAR

WHERE TO STAY ON THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY

While walking the West Highland Way it’s possible to wild camp, stay in campsites, or use indoor accommodation every night. It’s also possible to mix and match, camping some nights and glamping or staying in hotels/B&Bs for others. Where you choose to stay may depend on your budget or the type of experience you are looking for.

We give an overview of camping, glamping, and accommodation options in this guide. However, we have covered wild camping and campsite options in great detail in our Camping the West Highland Way Guide, and provide an extensive list of indoor options in our West Highland Way Accommodation Guide, so we recommend that you read these guides for full details.

WILD CAMPING THE WEST HIGHLAND WAY

Wild camping is permitted in Scotland in line with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code, and wild camping the West Highland Way is perfectly feasible. However, given the seasonal camping byelaws that exist in an area around Loch Lomond, and the fact that a number of the ‘usual’ start and end points for each section are residential or farming areas, you do need to plan your itinerary accordingly.

The best approach is to wild camp either before or after the main settlements along the route. On the Loch Lomond stretch, the 1st March – 30th September Camping Management Zone starts at the entrance to the Balmaha Plantation forest (56.090172, -4.533101, 1.2 km below the summit of Conic Hill), and ends above Ptarmigan Lodge (56.171755, -4.655221, 2.9 km after Rowardennan Hotel). There are signposts at both points, making it obvious when you have entered and exited the restricted camping zone.

If you want to wild camp between these two points, the only option is to secure a permit for the Lochan Maoil Dhuinne wild camping area, just before Rowardennan (56.142926, -4.639668). As there are only 5 permits granted per day (£4 per tent), many people opt to camp at Sallochy Campsite instead, which offers a lochside camping experience very close to wild camping. Otherwise, you must continue just beyond the end of the Camping Management Zone where there are a few good spots to pitch your tent (in the forest or lochside).

A tent on the pebbled shore of Loch Lomond at the Lochan Maoil Dhuinne camping area on the West Highland Way

Early morning in the Lochan Maoil Dhuinne permit camping zone on the shores of Loch Lomond



A tent on the pebbled shore of Loch Lomond at the Lochan Maoil Dhuinne camping area on the West Highland Way

Early morning in the Lochan Maoil Dhuinne
camping zone on the shores of Loch Lomond



An alternative camping option within the Camping Management Zone, but off the main route, is the island of Inchcailloch, accessible by on-demand boat from Balmaha. You must secure a permit in advance, with a maximum of 12 permits being issued for each day at a cost of £9 per person. There is a composting toilet, but no water or other facilities.

When wild camping it’s crucial that you Leave No Trace. Among other things, you must take all your rubbish with you, bury human waste and carry out used toilet paper, and minimise the impact of campfires. Plan ahead and pack rubbish bags and an outdoor toilet kit, including a trowel for digging a toilet hole, toilet paper, antibacterial hand gel, and rubbish bags for used toilet paper (nappy sacks or dog poo bags work great). You can dispose of your waste regularly in bins along the route.

For a section-by-section overview of the best wild camping locations along the route, check out our dedicated Camping the West Highland Way Guide. You can also purchase our detailed electronic map with the location of more than 50 suggested wild camping spots along the Way. 


SCOTTISH OUTDOOR ACCESS CODE

Access rights extend to wild camping. This type of camping is lightweight, done in small numbers and only for two or three nights in any one place. You can camp in this way wherever access rights apply, but help to avoid causing problems for local people and land managers by not camping in enclosed fields of crops or farm animals and by keeping well away from buildings, roads or historic structures. Take extra care to avoid disturbing deer stalking or grouse shooting. If you wish to camp close to a house or building, seek the owner’s permission. Leave no trace by:


WEST HIGHLAND WAY CAMPSITES

There are campsites with toilet and shower facilities along every section of the West Highland Way, apart from Bridge of Orchy and Inveroran, where informal wild camping areas are available. At each of these locations it’s possible to use the toilet facilities in the nearby hotels during opening hours, by purchasing something at the bar or making a donation. There were also two portaloos at the Bridge of Orchy camping area when we walked the route in May 2022.

If you want to camp but don’t want to carry your gear, staying at campsites is ideal. The baggage transfer services that operate on the WHW can drop off your bags at official campsites (and also at the Inveroran Hotel and Bridge of Orchy Hotel if you’re using the informal camping areas nearby).

A red tent nestled among oak trees in one of the shoreside pitches at Sallochy Campsite alongside Loch Lomond on the West Highland Way

Lochside camping at Sallochy Campsite between Balmaha and Rowardennan



A red tent nestled among oak trees in one of the shoreside pitches at Sallochy Campsite alongside Loch Lomond on the West Highland Way

Lochside camping at Sallochy Campsite



Open the drop down boxes below for a section-by-section outline of campsites on the West Highland Way. Note that a few of the campsites only accept 1 – 2 person sized tents, and most of them are only open between Spring and Autumn. For a more detailed look at campsites along the route, check out our dedicated Camping the West Highland Way Guide.

West Highland Way Campsite

  • 7.3 km/4.5 miles beyond Milngavie,
    1km/ 0.6 miles detour off route
  • Enquire direct for prices
  • Breakfast included
  • Open year round

Drymen Camping

  • £10 pp
  • Open 8th March – 23rd October

Inchcailloch Island Permit Camping Area

Milarrochy Bay Camping and Caravanning Club

  • Price varies, expect to pay £15+ pp

Cashel Campsite

  • £16 pp including hot shower
  • Open 1st March – 30th November

Sallochy Campsite

  • Tents only, lochside pitches
  • £8-9 pp
  • Open 1 April to 31 October
  • No showers

Inversnaid Bunkhouse

  • (1.5 km/0.8 miles detour off route)
  • £10 pp
  • full use of bunkhouse facilities

Beinglas Campsite

  • £12.50 pp
  • Open Spring – October

Strathfillan Wigwams (Auchtertyre)

  • £8 pp
  • £1 per 8 mins hot shower

Pine Trees Caravan Park

  • Primarily for caravans and glamping
  • Small tents bookable by telephone
  • Enquire direct for prices
  • Open 1st March – 30th October

By The Way Hostel and Campsite

  • £12 pp
  • Max 2-person tent size allowed
  • Closed if waterlogged due to heavy rain

No campsites with facilities

  • Informal wild camping by the river at Bridge of Orchy
  • 200 metres beyond the hotel

Informal wild camping at Inveroran

  • 400 metres beyond the hotel
  • Next to the river

Glen Coe Mountain Resort

  • £8 pp
  • £1 for 5 mins hot shower

Informal wild camping area at Kingshouse

  • Over the stone bridge behind Kingshouse Bunkhouse
  • Access to public toilets and showers
  •  £1 for 5 mins hot shower

Blackwater Hostel

  • £10+ pp
  • Max 2-person tent size allowed

MacDonald Hotel and Cabins

  • £10+ pp
  • Max 2-person tent size allowed

Glen Nevis Campsite

  • £11.50+ pp

WEST HIGHLAND WAY GLAMPING

Glamping the West Highland Way is often cheaper than staying in a hotel or B&B and it’s a little more comfortable than camping in a tent. Usually, you need to pay extra for your linen, or bring your own sleeping bag and towel. There are a number of glamping options along the route. The main ones for each section are outlined in the drop down boxes below.

West Highland Way Hotel and Campsite

  • 7.3 km/4.5 miles beyond Milngavie, 1km/ 0.6 miles detour off route
  • Safari Glamping Tent from approx £90 for 2 people incl. breakfast
  • Shepherd’s Hut from approx £135 for 2 people incl. breakfast

Duncan Family Farms (near Drymen)

  • Luxury En-Suite Glamping Pods from approx £250 for 2 people for 2 nights
  • All linen included
  • Minimum 2 night stay

Drymen Camping

  • Green Pods and Kocoons approx £40-50 for 2 people
  • Linen hire extra

No glamping options


Beinglas Campsite

  • Hut from £40 (£5 Sleeping Bag + Pillow Hire pp)
  • Bell Tent from £80

Strathfillan Wigwams (Auchtertyre)

  • Wigwams £40 – £75 for 2 people
  • Yurt £70 for 2 people
  • £5 linen hire pp
  • £1 per 8 mins hot shower

By The Way Hostel and Campsite (Tyndrum)

  • Various pods and huts
  • £40 – £60 for 2 people
  • £4 sleeping bag hire pp

Pine Trees Caravan Park (Tyndrum)

  • Various pods sleeping between 2-5 people
  • £40 – £85
  • NO LINEN HIRE must bring own sleeping bag, etc.

Bridge of Orchy Eco Pods

  • Sleeps 2
  • £82
  • Includes linen

Glen Coe Mountain Resort

  • Microlodge from £70 for up to 4 people
  • Sleeping bag hire £5 pp
  • £1 for 5 mins hot shower

Blackwater Hostel

  • Pods
  • From £45 for 2 people
  • £5 linen hire pp

MacDonald Hotel and Cabins

  • Cabins
  • From £45 for 2 people
  • Extra charge for linen hire

Nevis, Etive, and Coe

  • En-Suite Glamping Pods
  • £150 for 2 people
  • (Nevis and Etive minimum 2 night stay)
  • All linen and Towels Provided

Glen Nevis Campsite

  • Armadilla Camping Pods
  • From £80 for 2 people
  • NO LINEN HIRE must bring own sleeping bag, etc.

Highland Holidays (former Lochy Holiday Park)

  • Luxury en-suite Glamping Pod
  • From £90 for 2 people
  • Linen included

WEST HIGHLAND WAY INDOOR ACCOMMODATION

There is a wide range of indoor accommodation available along the West Highland Way, including budget hostels and bunkhouses, homely B&Bs, luxurious hotels, and all sorts in between. Bigger settlements have plenty of options (like Crianlarich, Tyndrum, or Kinlochleven) while others have very limited options (such as Rowardennan, Inverarnan, Bridge of Orchy, and Glencoe/Kingshouse). Booking in advance is highly recommended.

We go into more detail about accommodation on the West Highland Way in our complete guide, but for quick reference we’ve added an overview of options on each section of the route in the drop down boxes below. Each place is marked as budget, mid-range, or high-end using the following key:

Budget £ up to £50 pppn | Mid-Range ££ = £50 – £75 pppn | High-End £££ more than £75 pppn

Budget £ Up to £50 pppn

Mid-Range ££ = £50 – £75 pppn

High-End £££ More than £75 pppn